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Rediscover Kent, England’s oldest county, and delve into thousands of years of heritage. Knole, known as the Forgotten Palace, is an extraordinary building with many secrets to reveal. To unearth these, the National Trust is embarking on a refurbishment project to stabilise the state rooms and open up new areas – which will double the space open to the public. Nearby, the superb 14th-century moated manor of Ightham Mote has unique features spanning many centuries.

Historic Buildings in Kent - Interactive Map
Click on a location below - Zoom bar for fine tuning

  • Boughton Monchelsea

    A 16th century manor house with exquisite views of the Kent countryside. The interiors range from Tudor to Victorian, with primarily Victorian furnishings. Openings for special events and for pre-booked group tours.
    Church Hill Maidstone, ME17 4BU Telephone: 01622 743120
  • Belmont House

    An elegant 18th century house built by Samuel Wyatt in neo-classical style for Colonel John Montresor. The house later passed to General George Harris (later created Lord Harris). The 5th Lord Harris amassed a huge collection of historical clocks, which can be seen by visitors.
    Belmont Belmont Park, Throwley, Kent ME13 0HH Telephone: 01795 890202
  • Chartwell

    Home of Winston Churchill from 1922. Unremarkable exterior. The interior is full of Churchill memorabilia, from cigars to paintings to war correspondence.
    Mapleton Road Westerham, Kent TN16 1PS Telephone: 01732 868381
  • Cobham Hall

    An historic country house with roots as far back as the 12th century. Even earlier than that there was a substantial Roman villa here, but it ws in 1208 that the history of Cobham Hall as we know it really began. In that year Henry de Cobham, later the 1st Lord Cobham, is known to have inhabited an early manor house on the site.
    Cobham, Kent DA12 3BL Telephone: 01474 823371
  • Danson House

    Danson House was built in 1766 by Sir Robert Taylor for Sir John Boyd, a wealthy merchant. It is one of the best examples of Palladian architecture in the country. Much of the interior was designed by William Chambers. The house has recently undergone extensive restoration.
    Danson Pk Bexleyheath DA6 8HL Telephone: 020 8303 6699
  • Godinton House

    Godinton House and Gardens
    A lovely brick manor with roots dating back to the 14th century. Godinton was for centuries the home of the Toke family. Much of the present house owes its form to work undertaken by Captain Nicholas Toke beginning in 1627. The interior offers much of interest, from the medieval great hall with its hammerbeam roof to the 17th century great chamber with profuse Georgian panelling.
    Godinton House Godinton Park Ashford TN23 3BP Telephone: 01233 620 773
  • Hall Place

    Hall Place and Gardens
    A lovely manor house built in 1537 for the Lord Mayor of London, Sir John Champneis. The interior boasts a very fine Tudor great hall with original panelling, overlooked by a minstrel's gallery. The house is now owned by Bexley Heritage Trust.
    Hall Place Bourne Road, Bexley DA5 1PQ Telephone: 01322 558 676
  • Ightham Mote

    Ightham Mote is one of the best preserved, and certainly one of the most beautiful, moated manor houses in England. The house dates back to the 14th century. The name presents a challenge to linguists; Ightham may refer to an early settler of the region, named Ehta or Ohta. Mote may refer to the moat which surrounds the manor, or it may equally well be a derivative of 'moot', a gathering place.
    Mote Road Sevenoaks, Ivy Hatch, Sevenoaks, Kent TN15 0NT Telephone: 01732 810378
  • Knole

    Approached through a long deerpark drive. Begun in late 15th century, the house was taken over by Henry VIII. Great hall with musician's gallery, four poster beds, painted staircases. Highly recommended.
    Sevenoaks Kent TN15 0RP Telephone: 01732 450608
  • Nurstead Court

    History abounds at Nurstead Court. The manor dates back over 1000 years, though the oldest part of the current house is a relative youngster, built in 1320 by Stehan de Gravesend, Bishop of London. The great hall is one of the finest in England, rising 36 feet to the roof. A solar, or lord's bedchamber, lies above the great hall; this has acted as a bedchamber for an extraordinary 670 years! The original building was much remodelled in the Victorian period, with a wing added at right angles to the hall. A tower stands at one corner of the hall; this was built for defensive purposes but was later used as a chapel. It is now in ruins.
    Nurstead Court Nurstead Chuch Lane, Meopham, Kent DA13 9AD Telephone: 0800 093 4935
  • Old Soar Manor

    The solar block is all that remains of this 13th century knight's house. The house was built by the Culpeper (Culpepper) family, who were powerful landowners from Aylesford. They built Old Soar to be a combination prestigious dwelling house and defensible stronghold. It was never by any stretch a castle, but it was far more of a defensive structure than a simple hall house. It was also a testament to their influence and wealth.
    Plaxtol, Borough Green, TN15 0QX Telephone: 01732 810378
  • Penshurst Place

    Formal gardens surround this seat of the powerful Sidney family, begun in 1340. Hall with central hearth, stone staircase, long gallery.
    Penshurst Tonbridge, Kent TN11 8DG Telephone: 01892 870307
  • Faversham Stone Chapel

    Faversham Stone Chapel A2, Kent, Faversham ME13 8RX Telephone: 01795 534542
  • Down House

    With its unique place in the history of science, Down House, the home of Charles Darwin, is one of the major visitor attractions in the South East. See the study where Darwin wrote 'On the Origin of Species', still as it was when he worked here, and stroll through the extensive gardens that so inspired the great scientist.
    Equally fascinating are the glimpses you get into the life of the Darwins in the family rooms. And there’s an exciting interactive multimedia tour, narrated by David Attenborough, to tell you more about how Darwin developed his ideas.
    For anyone with an interest in science and evolution, this is a fascinating family day out in Kent.
    Don't miss Carnivorous plants and exotic orchids in the hot-house.
    Tea room with seasonally produced food from our gardens.
    A replica of Darwin's cabin on HMS Beagle
    Luxted Road, Downe, Kent - BR6 7JT Telephone: 01689 859119
  • Squerryes Court

    William and Mary house in countryside setting. Extensive collection of furniture and porcelain of the 18th century.
    Squerryes Court Squerryes Westerham TN16 1SJ Telephone: 01959 562 345
  • Archbishops Palace

    Archbishops Palace, Maidstone
    A 14th century grand residential palace built for the Archbishops of Canterbury on the bank of the River Medway in Maidstone. As important church officials the archbishops were constantly travelling to London, and the palace at Maidstone provided a very comfortable - and impressive - place to stay on the journey.
    Mill Street Maidstone, Kent ME15 6YE Telephone: 0845 824 7400
  • Whitstable Castle

    Not so much a castle as a castellated manor house, Whitstable Castle dates to the last years of the 18th century. It was built by Charles Pearson, a successful London businessman and entrepreneur. In 1835 the manor was purchased by William Ellis, and it was he who transformed the earlier manor, adding a west wing and bell tower. The castle was eventually purchased by the Whitstable District Urban Council. It is now operated by a charity, the Whitstable Castle Trust, and used as a venue for concerts, weddings, and community activities.
    Tower Hill Whitstable CT5 2BW Telephone: 01227 281726
  • Stoneacre

    Late 15th century half-timbered yeoman's house with a great hall typical of the period. The house was restored in the 1920s, when a new wing was added and the house extended to the rear. It was granted to the National Trust in 1928. Behind the house is a restored cottage garden.
    Stoneacre Lane Otham, Maidstone ME15 8RS Telephone: 01892 893861
  • St Alphelge Church

    Canterbury, St Alphege Church
    St Alphege's was built around 1070 by Archbishop Lanfranc. It was rebuilt in the 12th century, and again in the 13th and 15th centuries. Among the interesting features is a late 15th century pillar, funded by a bequest from Thomas Prude. A brass coat of arms has been set into the pillar, with the inscription, 'Gaude Prude Thoma per quem fit ista columna.', which vey loosely translates as 'Thomas Prude paid for this column'.
    St Alphege Church Palace Street
  • Canterbury City Walls

    The Romans erected the first walls around Canterbury between 270 and 290 AD. Very little of those Roman walls remain. The walls we see today are medieval. The medieval walls surounded the entire city of Canterbury and were pierced by 8 gates, West Gate, North Gate, Quenin Gate, Burgate, Newingate, Riding Gate, Worth Gate, and London Gate. Of these, only West Gate remains. Location: Accessible from several points. The best section for walking the walls is located at Dane John Garden.
    Dane John Ct Canterbury, CT1 2RN Telephone: 01227 862000
  • Finchcocks

    Goudhurst Kent TN17 1HH Telephone: 01580 211702
  • Conduit House

    All that remains of medieval waterworks created to supply the nearby abbey of St Augustine. Location: On Kings Park road, off North Holmes Road. Limited parking along the verge, or a short 10 minute stroll from St Augustines Abbey.
  • 8 Palace Street

    One of Canterbury's best half-timbered buildings. 8 Palace Street is a 13th century building with later additions. It may have been built as the rectory for the nearby church of St Alphege. Location: On the north side of Palace Street, a short stroll from the cathedral Canterbury.
    8 Palace St Canterbury, Kent CT1 2DY
  • Charing Palace

    The remains of an 11th century bishops palace. Charing Palace was used by Archbishops of Canterbury as a stopping place between their London residence of Lambeth Palace and Canterbury. Location: The Bishop's Palace is located just off Charing High Street, beside the church. Note that as of this writing the Palace is privately owned and not generally open to visitors.
  • Fyndon Gate

    Fyndon Gate is the original gatehouse to St Augustine's Abbey. It was rebuilt from 1301-1309 by Abbot Fyndon. In 1660 Charles I and Henrietta Maria stayed in the State Chambers over the gatewaty arch on their wedding night, following their marriage in Canterbury Cathedral. Elizabeth I is also reputed to have been welcomed to the State Chambers.
  • Blackfriars

    The remains of a 13th century friary, on the bank of the River Stour. Blackfriars was founded around 1237 by Dominican monks, whose black surcoat gave them the popular monicker 'Black Friars'.
    Blackfriars St Canterbury, Kent CT1
  • Dungeness Lighthouse

    Dungeness Old Lighthouse
    A Grade-I listed lighthouse standing in an exposed position on the vast shingle expanse of Dungeness. The shingle posed a serious threat to shipping, and there has been a lighthouse here since 1615, when James I granted a license to erect a 35 foot high wooden tower on the spot.
    Dungeness, Romney Marsh Romney Marsh, Kent TN29 9NB Telephone: 01797 321 300
  • Kings School

    King's School can make a good claim to be the oldest school in Britain. There was almost certainly a school established by St Augustine shortly after his arrival in Kent in 597 AD. Initially that school would have served primarily to train priests, but by the late 7th century the school had attained a reputation for learning that drew scholars from across Britain.
    The King's School Canterbury Kent CT1 2ES Tel Telephone: 01227 595501
  • West Gate Towers

    One of the iconic landmarks of Canterbury, the old West Gate stands at the west end of the High Street, beside the River Stour. Generations of medieval pilgrims passed under the gatehouse arch on their way to the shrine of Thomas a Becket at Canterbury Cathedral. Road traffic now flows through the arch - its a bit of an eye-opener to see a modern coach navigate the narrow opening! Location: At the west end of High Street. Easy foot access from the Cathedral precinct.
    Canterbury Westgate Towers St. Peters Street, Canterbury CT1 2BQ Telephone: 01227 789576
  • Horne's Place Chapel

    An unusual 14th century private chapel built by William Horne around 1360. The chapel was originally attatched to Horne's manor house. Location: From the south, proceed through Appledore to appledore Heath. Horne's Place is off the first right turning.
  • Owletts

    A lovely red-brick Kentish Yeoman's house dating from the late 17th century. The house was built for Bonham and Elizabeth Hayes, successful farmers. It is two storeys high, with dormer windows. The house interiors were completed in 1684, including the ornate plasterwork, which was probably executed by Italian craftsmen.
    The Street, Cobham Gravesend, Kent, England, DA12 3AP
  • Chalybeate Springs

    The historic springs at Tunbridge Wells owes much to a self-indulgent young nobleman. In 1606 Dudley, Lord North, was visiting friends at the Abergavenny Estate in Eridge. He was headed back to London after a night of heavy drinking, feeling a little the worse for wear, when he noticed redddish water seeping from the ground. Location: At the northern end of the Pantiles, in the centre of town.
    Chalybeate Spring The Pantiles, Royal Tunbridge Wells, TN2 5TE Telephone: 01892 515675
  • Milton Chantry

    The oldest building in Gravesend, Milton Chantry has a fascinating history. It was built by the Earl of Pembroke, Aymer de Valence, in 1322 to act as a family chantry chapel, and as chapel for a leper hospital, but after the English Reformation it became a tavern, before being used as part of a fort in the late 18th century. The building houses displays on local history and the heritage of Milton Chantry itself.
    New Tavern Fort Gardens, Gravesend, Kent, England
  • The Roper Gate

    The Roper Gate is a decorated mid-16th century gateway that once provided an entrance to Place House, home of William Roper and his wife, Margaret Roper, daughter of Sir Thomas More. The gate is a wonderful example of decorative Tudor brickwork. Nothing now remains of Place House beyond the gateway.
    St Dunstan Street, Canterbury, Kent, England
  • Christchurch Gateway

    The main visitor entrance to Canterbury Cathedral precinct is through this highly decorated gateway, which was originally built to celbrate the marriage of Arthur, Prince of Wales, to Catherine of Aragon in 1502. Arthur, unfortunately, died a few months later, and the gate was not finished for another 20 years. Location: Off Butter Market. Just follow the signs for the cathedral!
    Christ Church Gateway Sun Street, Canterbury, Kent CT1 2HW
  • Reculvers Towers

    Reculver Towers is a striking pair of 12th century church towers built within a Roman fort on the very edge of the Wantsum Channel. The towers, known as 'The Two Sisters', were erected on the foundation of a 7th century Saxon church. The 12th century church is gone now, the victim of erosion from the constant wear and tear of waves on this seaside location.
    Reculver, Kent, England
  • St Augustines Cross

    A Victorian cross in Celtic style marks the traditional site of St Augustine's landing in 597 AD. Augustine and his supporters supposedly paused here to say mass before travelling on to Canterbury.
    Cliffs End, Kent, England
  • Smallhythe Place

    A lovely 16th century half-timbered house once owned by actress Ellen Terry. The interiors showcase Terry memorabilia and historic theatre costumes. A thatched theatre is located in the grounds.
    Tenterden, Kent, England, TN30 7NG
  • Western Heights

    At the height of the Napoleonic Wars the threat of French invasion on the south coast of England was very real. The government put into place a comprehensive set of coastal defenses to counter that threat. One of the most ambitious of these was the development of the Western Heights above Dover which together make up the largest set of Napoleonic defenses in Britain.
    Dover, Kent, England
  • Greyfriars Chapel

    Greyfriars Chapel and Franciscan Garden
    The chapel is the only remaining part of a Franciscan friary established in 1267. Greyfriars (named for the grey habits of the Franciscan order of monks) was the first Franciscan monastery in England.
    Eastbridge Hospital 25 High Street, Canterbury, CT1 2BD Telephone: 01227 471688
  • St John's Hospital

    St John the Baptist Hospital is the oldest almshouse in England (though there are others of a similar date in Winchester). The almshouse was established in 1085 by Lanfranc, Archbishop of Canterbury, as a residence for needy 30 men and an equal number of women. The main entrance is through a beautiful timber-framed gatehouse off Northgate.
    Northgate, Canterbury, Kent, England, CT1 1BG
  • Maison Dieu

    Maison Dieu is a fascinating medieval building dating to at least 1234, although it may be much older. It is traditionally held to have been founded by Henry III as a monastic hospital, but it appears that Henry merely leant his name to an already existing establishment. Maison Dieu (which translates at 'House of God') has been a Royal lodge, hospital, pilgrim's hostel, and an almshouse for royal servants. The building is now a museum, showcasing Roman and medieval artefacts found nearby.
    Ospringe, Faversham, Kent, England, ME13 8NS
  • House of Agnes

    The House of Agnes is a beautiful half-timbered medieval coaching inn just outside the old city walls of Canterbury. It takes its name from the character Agnes Wickfield, in the novel David Copperfield, by Charles Dickens. Dickens set several scenes from the novel in this inn, which dates to the 13th century.
    House of Agnes 71 St Dunstans Street Canterbury, Kent CT2 8BN Telephone: 01227 472185
  • Old Weavers House

    One of the most photographed historic buildings in Canterbury, the Old Weavers House is a gorgeous half-timbered building on the River Stour. The river quite literally laps at the side of the building, which currently houses a popular restaurant.
    3 St Peter's St, Canterbury, Kent, England, CT1 2AT
  • Restoration House

    A unique mansion house in historic Rochester. The house takes its name from the fact that Charles II stayed here on the eve of his restoration to the crown of England following the short-lived Commonwealth. Charles Dickens used Restoration House as the model for Satis House, the home of Satis House of Miss Havisham in his novel 'Great Expectations'.
    17-19 Crow Lane, Rochester, Kent, England, ME1 1RF
  • Sir John Boys House

    Possibly the most photographed historic building in Canterbury after the Cathedral, Sir John Boys House (sometimes known as Crooked House, King's Gallery, or Old Kings Shop) is a delightfully skewed 17th century half-timbered building at the extreme end of Palace Street, with projecting jetties onto Palace and King Streets.
    28 Palace Street, Canterbury, Kent, England, CT1 2DZ
  • South Foreland Lighthouse

    A Victorian lighthouse standing atop the famous White Cliffs of Dover. The lighthouse was the sie of two famous scientific breakthroughs, Marconi conducted his wireless experiments here, and Faraday's first electric light glowed on this spot. Visitors can climb to the top of the tower for wonderful views over the English Channel to France.
    The Front, St Margaret's Bay St Margarets, Dover, Kent, England, CT15 6HP
  • St John's Commandery

    A medieval chapel which was converted into a farm building during the 16th century. The Commandery features a striking timber roof with an ornamental plaster ceiling.
    Densole, Swingfield, Kent, England, CT15 7HG
  • St George's Tower

    The clock tower is all that temains of the medieval church of St George the Martyr. The church is best known as the place where playwrite Christopher Marlowe was baptised.
    High Street, Canterbury, Kent, England
  • Temple Manor

    An unasuming house dating to the 13th century, once owned by the Knights Templar.
    Strood, Rochester, Kent, England
  • St Leonard's Tower

    The very well preserved remains of a Norman tower keep. The keep was constructed around 1080, possibly by Gundulf, the Bishop of Rochester at that time. The tower takes its name from the fact that a church dedicated to St Leonard used to stand nearby.
    West Malling, Kent, England

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Walk in the footsteps of the infamous Tudors and relive the dramatic love intrigues of King Henry VIII at Hever Castle. Here you can find many artefacts unfolding Anne Boleyn’s ill-fated romance with the king and then make the short journey to Penshurst Place, where Henry stayed whilst he was courting Anne. The Home of Charles Darwin - Down House.
Penshurst Place, near Tonbridge, has been home to the Sidney family for more than 450 years. Penshurst's formal garden is a rare surviving example of Elizabethan design, but its records go back even further, to 1346, making it among the oldest in private ownership. Fifteenth-century Lullingstone Castle, Eynsford, has been home to 20 generations of the Hart Dyke family. Visit the castle today and you can watch the first-ever World Garden of Plants being established by plant hunter Tom Hart Dyke. It will eventually feature 10,000 species from around the globe.
Belmont House
Belmont House
An elegant 18th century house built by Samuel Wyatt in neo-classical style for Colonel John Montresor. The house later passed to General George Harris (later created Lord Harris). The 5th Lord Harris amassed a huge collection of historical clocks, which can be seen by visitors.
Belmont Belmont Park, Throwley, Kent ME13 0HH Telephone: 01795 890202
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Cobham Hall
An historic country house with roots as far back as the 12th century. Even earlier than that there was a substantial Roman villa here, but it ws in 1208 that the history of Cobham Hall as we know it really began. In that year Henry de Cobham, later the 1st Lord Cobham, is known to have inhabited an early manor house on the site.
Cobham, Kent DA12 3BL Telephone: 01474 823371
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Hall Place
Hall Place and Gardens
A lovely manor house built in 1537 for the Lord Mayor of London, Sir John Champneis. The interior boasts a very fine Tudor great hall with original panelling, overlooked by a minstrel's gallery. The house is now owned by Bexley Heritage Trust.
Hall Place Bourne Road, Bexley DA5 1PQ Telephone: 01322 558 676
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Nurstead Court
History abounds at Nurstead Court. The manor dates back over 1000 years, though the oldest part of the current house is a relative youngster, built in 1320 by Stehan de Gravesend, Bishop of London. The great hall is one of the finest in England, rising 36 feet to the roof. A solar, or lord's bedchamber, lies above the great hall; this has acted as a bedchamber for an extraordinary 670 years! The original building was much remodelled in the Victorian period, with a wing added at right angles to the hall. A tower stands at one corner of the hall; this was built for defensive purposes but was later used as a chapel. It is now in ruins.
Nurstead Court Nurstead Chuch Lane, Meopham, Kent DA13 9AD Telephone: 0800 093 4935
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Faversham Stone Chapel
Faversham Stone Chapel A2, Kent, Faversham ME13 8RX Telephone: 01795 534542
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Archbishops Palace
Archbishops Palace, Maidstone
A 14th century grand residential palace built for the Archbishops of Canterbury on the bank of the River Medway in Maidstone. As important church officials the archbishops were constantly travelling to London, and the palace at Maidstone provided a very comfortable - and impressive - place to stay on the journey.
Mill Street Maidstone, Kent ME15 6YE Telephone: 0845 824 7400
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St Alphege Church
Canterbury, St Alphege Church
St Alphege's was built around 1070 by Archbishop Lanfranc. It was rebuilt in the 12th century, and again in the 13th and 15th centuries. Among the interesting features is a late 15th century pillar, funded by a bequest from Thomas Prude. A brass coat of arms has been set into the pillar, with the inscription, 'Gaude Prude Thoma per quem fit ista columna.', which vey loosely translates as 'Thomas Prude paid for this column'.
St Alphege Church Palace Street Canterbury
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Conduit House
All that remains of medieval waterworks created to supply the nearby abbey of St Augustine. Location: On Kings Park road, off North Holmes Road. Limited parking along the verge, or a short 10 minute stroll from St Augustines Abbey.
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Fyndon Gate
Fyndon Gate is the original gatehouse to St Augustine's Abbey. It was rebuilt from 1301-1309 by Abbot Fyndon. In 1660 Charles I and Henrietta Maria stayed in the State Chambers over the gatewaty arch on their wedding night, following their marriage in Canterbury Cathedral. Elizabeth I is also reputed to have been welcomed to the State Chambers.
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King's School
King's School can make a good claim to be the oldest school in Britain. There was almost certainly a school established by St Augustine shortly after his arrival in Kent in 597 AD. Initially that school would have served primarily to train priests, but by the late 7th century the school had attained a reputation for learning that drew scholars from across Britain.
The King's School Canterbury Kent CT1 2ES Tel Telephone: 01227 595501
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Owletts
A lovely red-brick Kentish Yeoman's house dating from the late 17th century. The house was built for Bonham and Elizabeth Hayes, successful farmers. It is two storeys high, with dormer windows. The house interiors were completed in 1684, including the ornate plasterwork, which was probably executed by Italian craftsmen.
The Street, Cobham Gravesend, Kent, England, DA12 3AP
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The Roper Gate
The Roper Gate is a decorated mid-16th century gateway that once provided an entrance to Place House, home of William Roper and his wife, Margaret Roper, daughter of Sir Thomas More. The gate is a wonderful example of decorative Tudor brickwork. Nothing now remains of Place House beyond the gateway.
St Dunstan Street, Canterbury, Kent, England
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St Augustine's Cross
A Victorian cross in Celtic style marks the traditional site of St Augustine's landing in 597 AD. Augustine and his supporters supposedly paused here to say mass before travelling on to Canterbury.
Cliffs End, Kent, England
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Western Heights
At the height of the Napoleonic Wars the threat of French invasion on the south coast of England was very real. The government put into place a comprehensive set of coastal defenses to counter that threat. One of the most ambitious of these was the development of the Western Heights above Dover which together make up the largest set of Napoleonic defenses in Britain.
Dover, Kent, England
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Maison Dieu
Maison Dieu is a fascinating medieval building dating to at least 1234, although it may be much older. It is traditionally held to have been founded by Henry III as a monastic hospital, but it appears that Henry merely leant his name to an already existing establishment. Maison Dieu (which translates at 'House of God') has been a Royal lodge, hospital, pilgrim's hostel, and an almshouse for royal servants. The building is now a museum, showcasing Roman and medieval artefacts found nearby.
Ospringe, Faversham, Kent, England, ME13 8NS
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Quebec House
The elegant red-brick childhood home of General James Wolfe, victor of the Battle of Quebec. The house features memorabilia relating to Wolfe, and exhibits on Georgian life.
Quebec Square, Westerham, Kent, England, TN16 1TD
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South Foreland Lighthouse
A Victorian lighthouse standing atop the famous White Cliffs of Dover. The lighthouse was the sie of two famous scientific breakthroughs, Marconi conducted his wireless experiments here, and Faraday's first electric light glowed on this spot. Visitors can climb to the top of the tower for wonderful views over the English Channel to France.
The Front, St Margaret's Bay St Margarets, Dover, Kent, England, CT15 6HP
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Temple Manor
An unasuming house dating to the 13th century, once owned by the Knights Templar.
Strood, Rochester, Kent, England
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Chartwell
Chartwell
Home of Winston Churchill from 1922. Unremarkable exterior. The interior is full of Churchill memorabilia, from cigars to paintings to war correspondence.
Mapleton Road Westerham, Kent TN16 1PS Telephone: 01732 868381
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Godinton House
Godinton House and Gardens
A lovely brick manor with roots dating back to the 14th century. Godinton was for centuries the home of the Toke family. Much of the present house owes its form to work undertaken by Captain Nicholas Toke beginning in 1627. The interior offers much of interest, from the medieval great hall with its hammerbeam roof to the 17th century great chamber with profuse Georgian panelling.
Godinton House Godinton Park Ashford TN23 3BP Telephone: 01233 620 773
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Knole
Approached through a long deerpark drive. Begun in late 15th century, the house was taken over by Henry VIII. Great hall with musician's gallery, four poster beds, painted staircases. Highly recommended.
Sevenoaks Kent TN15 0RP Telephone: 01732 450608
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Penshurst Place
Formal gardens surround this seat of the powerful Sidney family, begun in 1340. Hall with central hearth, stone staircase, long gallery.
Penshurst Tonbridge, Kent TN11 8DG Telephone: 01892 870307
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Squerryes Court
William and Mary house in countryside setting. Extensive collection of furniture and porcelain of the 18th century.
Squerryes Court/Squerryes Westerham TN16 1SJ Telephone: 01959 562 345
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Whitstable Castle
Not so much a castle as a castellated manor house, Whitstable Castle dates to the last years of the 18th century. It was built by Charles Pearson, a successful London businessman and entrepreneur. In 1835 the manor was purchased by William Ellis, and it was he who transformed the earlier manor, adding a west wing and bell tower. The castle was eventually purchased by the Whitstable District Urban Council. It is now operated by a charity, the Whitstable Castle Trust, and used as a venue for concerts, weddings, and community activities.
Tower Hill Whitstable CT5 2BW Telephone: 01227 281726
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Canterbury City Walls
Stacks Image 38125
The Romans erected the first walls around Canterbury between 270 and 290 AD. Very little of those Roman walls remain. The walls we see today are medieval. The medieval walls surounded the entire city of Canterbury and were pierced by 8 gates, West Gate, North Gate, Quenin Gate, Burgate, Newingate, Riding Gate, Worth Gate, and London Gate. Of these, only West Gate remains. Location: Accessible from several points. The best section for walking the walls is located at Dane John Garden.
Dane John Ct Canterbury, CT1 2RN Telephone: 01227 862000
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Charing Place
The remains of an 11th century bishops palace. Charing Palace was used by Archbishops of Canterbury as a stopping place between their London residence of Lambeth Palace and Canterbury. Location: The Bishop's Palace is located just off Charing High Street, beside the church. Note that as of this writing the Palace is privately owned and not generally open to visitors.
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Dungeness Lighthouse
Dungeness Old Lighthouse
A Grade-I listed lighthouse standing in an exposed position on the vast shingle expanse of Dungeness. The shingle posed a serious threat to shipping, and there has been a lighthouse here since 1615, when James I granted a license to erect a 35 foot high wooden tower on the spot.
Dungeness, Romney Marsh Romney Marsh, Kent TN29 9NB Telephone: 01797 321 300
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Horne's Place Chapel
An unusual 14th century private chapel built by William Horne around 1360. The chapel was originally attatched to Horne's manor house. Location: From the south, proceed through Appledore to appledore Heath. Horne's Place is off the first right turning.
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Milton Chantry
The oldest building in Gravesend, Milton Chantry has a fascinating history. It was built by the Earl of Pembroke, Aymer de Valence, in 1322 to act as a family chantry chapel, and as chapel for a leper hospital, but after the English Reformation it became a tavern, before being used as part of a fort in the late 18th century. The building houses displays on local history and the heritage of Milton Chantry itself.
New Tavern Fort Gardens, Gravesend, Kent, England
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Receivers Towers
Reculver Towers is a striking pair of 12th century church towers built within a Roman fort on the very edge of the Wantsum Channel. The towers, known as 'The Two Sisters', were erected on the foundation of a 7th century Saxon church. The 12th century church is gone now, the victim of erosion from the constant wear and tear of waves on this seaside location.
Reculver, Kent, England
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Smallhythe Place
A lovely 16th century half-timbered house once owned by actress Ellen Terry. The interiors showcase Terry memorabilia and historic theatre costumes. A thatched theatre is located in the grounds.
Tenterden, Kent, England, TN30 7NG
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St John's Hospital
St John the Baptist Hospital is the oldest almshouse in England (though there are others of a similar date in Winchester). The almshouse was established in 1085 by Lanfranc, Archbishop of Canterbury, as a residence for needy 30 men and an equal number of women. The main entrance is through a beautiful timber-framed gatehouse off Northgate.
Northgate, Canterbury, Kent, England, CT1 1BG
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House of Agnes
The House of Agnes is a beautiful half-timbered medieval coaching inn just outside the old city walls of Canterbury. It takes its name from the character Agnes Wickfield, in the novel David Copperfield, by Charles Dickens. Dickens set several scenes from the novel in this inn, which dates to the 13th century.
House of Agnes 71 St Dunstans Street Canterbury, Kent CT2 8BN Telephone: 01227 472185
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Restoration House
A unique mansion house in historic Rochester. The house takes its name from the fact that Charles II stayed here on the eve of his restoration to the crown of England following the short-lived Commonwealth. Charles Dickens used Restoration House as the model for Satis House, the home of Satis House of Miss Havisham in his novel 'Great Expectations'.
17-19 Crow Lane, Rochester, Kent, England, ME1 1RF
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St George's Tower
The clock tower is all that temains of the medieval church of St George the Martyr. The church is best known as the place where playwrite Christopher Marlowe was baptised.
High Street, Canterbury, Kent, England
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St Leonard's Tower
The very well preserved remains of a Norman tower keep. The keep was constructed around 1080, possibly by Gundulf, the Bishop of Rochester at that time. The tower takes its name from the fact that a church dedicated to St Leonard used to stand nearby.
West Malling, Kent, England
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Boughton Monchelsea
Boughton Monchelsea Place
A 16th century manor house with exquisite views of the Kent countryside. The interiors range from Tudor to Victorian, with primarily Victorian furnishings. Openings for special events and for pre-booked group tours.
Church Hill Maidstone, ME17 4BU Telephone: 01622 743120
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Danson House
Danson House was built in 1766 by Sir Robert Taylor for Sir John Boyd, a wealthy merchant. It is one of the best examples of Palladian architecture in the country. Much of the interior was designed by William Chambers. The house has recently undergone extensive restoration.
Danson Pk Bexleyheath DA6 8HL Telephone: 020 8303 6699
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Ightham Mote
Ightham Mote is one of the best preserved, and certainly one of the most beautiful, moated manor houses in England. The house dates back to the 14th century. The name presents a challenge to linguists; Ightham may refer to an early settler of the region, named Ehta or Ohta. Mote may refer to the moat which surrounds the manor, or it may equally well be a derivative of 'moot', a gathering place.
Mote Road Sevenoaks, Ivy Hatch, Sevenoaks, Kent TN15 0NT Telephone: 01732 810378
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Old Soar Manor
The solar block is all that remains of this 13th century knight's house. The house was built by the Culpeper (Culpepper) family, who were powerful landowners from Aylesford. They built Old Soar to be a combination prestigious dwelling house and defensible stronghold. It was never by any stretch a castle, but it was far more of a defensive structure than a simple hall house. It was also a testament to their influence and wealth.
Plaxtol, Borough Green, TN15 0QX Telephone: 01732 810378
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Down House
With its unique place in the history of science, Down House, the home of Charles Darwin, is one of the major visitor attractions in the South East. See the study where Darwin wrote 'On the Origin of Species', still as it was when he worked here, and stroll through the extensive gardens that so inspired the great scientist.
Equally fascinating are the glimpses you get into the life of the Darwins in the family rooms. And there’s an exciting interactive multimedia tour, narrated by David Attenborough, to tell you more about how Darwin developed his ideas.
For anyone with an interest in science and evolution, this is a fascinating family day out in Kent.
Don't miss Carnivorous plants and exotic orchids in the hot-house.
Tea room with seasonally produced food from our gardens.
A replica of Darwin's cabin on HMS Beagle
Luxted Road, Downe, Kent - BR6 7JT Telephone: 01689 859119
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Stoneacre
Late 15th century half-timbered yeoman's house with a great hall typical of the period. The house was restored in the 1920s, when a new wing was added and the house extended to the rear. It was granted to the National Trust in 1928. Behind the house is a restored cottage garden.
Stoneacre Lane Otham, Maidstone ME15 8RS Telephone: 01892 893861
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Finchcocks
Goudhurst Kent TN17 1HH Telephone: 01580 211702
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8 Palace Street
One of Canterbury's best half-timbered buildings. 8 Palace Street is a 13th century building with later additions. It may have been built as the rectory for the nearby church of St Alphege. Location: On the north side of Palace Street, a short stroll from the cathedral Canterbury
8 Palace St Canterbury, Kent CT1 2DY
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Blackfriars
The remains of a 13th century friary, on the bank of the River Stour. Blackfriars was founded around 1237 by Dominican monks, whose black surcoat gave them the popular monicker 'Black Friars'.
Blackfriars St Canterbury, Kent CT1
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West Gate Towers
One of the iconic landmarks of Canterbury, the old West Gate stands at the west end of the High Street, beside the River Stour. Generations of medieval pilgrims passed under the gatehouse arch on their way to the shrine of Thomas a Becket at Canterbury Cathedral. Road traffic now flows through the arch - its a bit of an eye-opener to see a modern coach navigate the narrow opening! Location: At the west end of High Street. Easy foot access from the Cathedral precinct.
Canterbury Westgate Towers St. Peters Street, Canterbury CT1 2BQ Telephone: 01227 789576
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Chalybeate Springs
The historic springs at Tunbridge Wells owes much to a self-indulgent young nobleman. In 1606 Dudley, Lord North, was visiting friends at the Abergavenny Estate in Eridge. He was headed back to London after a night of heavy drinking, feeling a little the worse for wear, when he noticed redddish water seeping from the ground. Location: At the northern end of the Pantiles, in the centre of town.
Chalybeate Spring The Pantiles, Royal Tunbridge Wells, TN2 5TE Telephone: 01892 515675
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Christ Church Gateway
The main visitor entrance to Canterbury Cathedral precinct is through this highly decorated gateway, which was originally built to celbrate the marriage of Arthur, Prince of Wales, to Catherine of Aragon in 1502. Arthur, unfortunately, died a few months later, and the gate was not finished for another 20 years. Location: Off Butter Market. Just follow the signs for the cathedral!
Christ Church Gateway Sun Street, Canterbury, Kent CT1 2HW
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Conquest House
On 29 December, 1170, four knights, Reginald FitzUrse, Hugh de Moreville, William de Tracy, and Richard le Breton, met at a house near Canterbury Cathedral to plan what they would do on the morow. Whatever plan they discussed, the result was the murder of Thomas Becket, Archbishop of Canterbury, a deed which changed the course of history and certainly changed the fortunes of Canterbury itself. The place where the knights met is reputed to be Conquest House.
Conquest House, 17 Palace St, Canterbury, Kent CT1 2DZ UK
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Greyfriars Chapel
Greyfriars Chapel and Franciscan Garden
The chapel is the only remaining part of a Franciscan friary established in 1267. Greyfriars (named for the grey habits of the Franciscan order of monks) was the first Franciscan monastery in England.
Eastbridge Hospital 25 High Street, Canterbury, CT1 2BD Telephone: 01227 471688
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Old Weavers House
One of the most photographed historic buildings in Canterbury, the Old Weavers House is a gorgeous half-timbered building on the River Stour. The river quite literally laps at the side of the building, which currently houses a popular restaurant.
3 St Peter's St, Canterbury, Kent, England, CT1 2AT
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Sir John Boys House
Possibly the most photographed historic building in Canterbury after the Cathedral, Sir John Boys House (sometimes known as Crooked House, King's Gallery, or Old Kings Shop) is a delightfully skewed 17th century half-timbered building at the extreme end of Palace Street, with projecting jetties onto Palace and King Streets.
28 Palace Street, Canterbury, Kent, England, CT1 2DZ
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St John's Commandery
A medieval chapel which was converted into a farm building during the 16th century. The Commandery features a striking timber roof with an ornamental plaster ceiling.
Densole, Swingfield, Kent, England, CT15 7HG
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