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A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms: in use in the county of Kent' by W.D.Parish and W.F.Shaw (Lewes: Farncombe,1888)
'The Dialect of Kent: being the fruits of many rambles' by F. W. T. Sanders (Private limited edition, 1950). Every attempt was made to contact the author to request permission to incorporate his work without success. His copyright is hereby acknowledged.

Kentish Dialect - Select A-Z from the menu below

  • A
    A
    '0D RABBIT IT od rab-it it interj. A profane expression, meaning, "May God subvert it." From French 'rabattre'. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 11
    AAZES
    n.pl. Hawthorn berries - S B Fletcher, 1940-50's; Boys from Snodland, L.R A.G. 1949. (see also Haazes, Harves, Haulms and Figs)
    Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977)
    ABED ubed adv. In bed. "You have not been abed, then?" Othello Act 1 Sc 3 ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    ABIDE ubie-d vb. To bear; to endure; to tolerate; to put-up-with. Generally used in a negative sentence
    as: "I cannot abide swaggerers" 2 Henry 4, Act 2 Sc 4 A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    ABITED ubei-tid adj. Mildewed. (see also Bythe) A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    ACHING-TOOTH
    n. To have an aching-tooth for anything, is to wish for it very much. a terr'ble aching-tooth for our old sow."
    A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    ACKLE
    "Muster Moppett's got Page 1
    vb. The only meaning attached to this word is that anything of a mechanical nature will, or will not, work. "My old watch won't ackle no-how!" "I got my cycle to ackle all right after giving the free-wheel a good oiling."
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 1
    ACT-ABOUT
    vb. (1) To play the fool. "He got acting-about, and fell down and broke his leg." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 1
    ACT-ABOUT
    vb. (2) "Stop acting-about; stop skylarking." - West Kent. L.R.A.G. Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977) Page 1
    Page 1 of 378
    ACT-THE-GIDDY-GOAT
    phr. To act foolishly. West Kent. L.R.A.G. Notes on 'A Dictionary of Kentish Dialect & Provincialisms' (c1977)
    ADDLE-HEADED
    adj. Stupid; thoughtless. - West Kent. L.R.A.G. Notes on 'A Dictionary of Kentish Dialect & Provincialisms' (c1977)
    ADDLE-PATE
    n. A foolish person. - West Kent. L.R.A.G. Notes on 'A Dictionary of Kentish Dialect & Provincialisms' (c1977)
    ADDLE-PLOT
    n. A person who spoils any amusement. - South Kent Notes on 'A Dictionary of Kentish Dialect & Provincialisms' (c1977)
    ADDLE-POOL
    n. A pool or puddle, near a dungheap, for receiving the fluid from it. - South Kent. Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977) Page 2
    ADLE ad-l adj. Unwell; confused. "My head's that adle, that I can't tend to nothin'." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 1
    A-DOIN'
    vb. Doing is here prefixed by "A", and the "G" of doing cut out. "What be ye a-doin' of Bob?" TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 1
    ADRY udrei- adj. In a dry or thirsty condition. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 2
    AFEARED ufee-rd prep.Affected with fear or terror. "Will not the ladies be afeared of the lion?" A Midsummer
    Night's Dream, Act 3 Sc1 ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    AFORE ufoa'r prep Before ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    AFTERMATH
    n. The grass which grows after the first crop has been mown for hay; called also Roughings. - Maidstone district. J.H.Bridge. (see also Aftermath, Fog)
    Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977) Page 2
    AFTERMEATH aaft-urmee-th n. The grass which grows after the first crop has been mown for hay; called also Roughings.
    (see also Aftermath, Fog) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    AGAINST
    adv. By the time that. "Get it ready against I come back." - R Cooke Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977)
    AGHTEND
    n. Eighth. 'The Old Kentish numerals, as exhibited in the 'Ayenbite of Inwyt', 1340, are identical with the Northen forms, but are no doubt of Frisian origin.'
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863)
    AGIN urgin- prep.Against; over-against; near. "He lives down de lane agin de stile." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    AGREEABLE urgree-ubl adj. Consenting; acquiescent. "They axed me what I thought an't, and I said as how I was
    agreeeable."' ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 2
    AIREY
    adj. A word denoting a particular type of weather; the meaning is:- windy, or blustery; cold and gusty wind. "It be a roight airey day today mairt!" "The way the old sun be a-goin' down looks loike being airey weather for tomorrow."
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 1
    AIRY
    n. The Area of a house. - Mrs Allen, c 1920. "One two three, olairy, My ball's down the airy. Don't forget to give it to Mary. Not to Charlie Chaplin." Ball game in West Kent and South East London in 1920's - London Street Games, Norman Douglas.
    Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977) Page 2
    AKERS ai-kurz n.pl Acorns ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 2
    ALEING ai-ling n. An old-fashioned entertainment, given with a view to collecting subscriptions from guests
    invited to partake of a brewing of ale. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 2
    ALE-SOP ai-lsop n. A refection consisting of toast and strong ale, hot; customarily partaken of by the
    servants in many large establishments in Kent on Christmas day. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    ALL-A-MOST au-lumoast adv. Almost. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    ALLEMASH-DAY al-imash n. French, À la mèche. The day on which the Canterbury silk-weavers begin to work by
    candle-light. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 2
    ALL-FOURS
    n. A well-known game at cards; said by Cotton in 'Compleat Gamester' 1709, p 81 to be "very much played in Kent". - L.R.A.G.
    Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977) Page 2
    ALL-ON
    adv. (1) Continually. "He kep all on actin'-about, and wouldn't tend to nothin'." (see also All- on (2)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 2
    ALL-ON
    adv. (2) Continually. "He kep all on actin'-about, and wouldn't tend to nothin'." - L.R.A.G. (see also All-on (1)
    Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977)
    ALLOW
    vb. To consider. "He's allowed to be the biggest rogue in Faversham." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    ALLOWANCE
    n. An allowance; bread and cheese and ale given to the wagoners when they have brought home the load, hence any recompense for little jobs of work.- R.Cooke. (see also 'lowance)
    Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977) Page 2
    ALLWORKS
    n. The name given to a labourer on a farm, who stands ready to do any and every kind of work to which he may be set.
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    ALONGST ulongst- prep.On the long side of anything. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    ALUS ai-lus n. An ale-house. "And when a goodish bit we'd bin We turned to de right han; And den we
    turned about agin, And see an alus stan." - Dick and Sal, st 33 A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    AM
    Used for are; as - "They'm gone to bed." (see also Them) A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    AM YE
    vb. Are you. "What am ye a-doin' of a-chasing them there chickens about?" The Dialect of Kent (c1950)
    AMENDMENT u'men-munt n. Manure laid on land. (see also Mendment) A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    AMMUT-CAST am-ut kaa-st n. An emmet's cast; an ant-hill. (see also Emmet's cast) A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    AMON ai-mun n. A hop, two steps, and a jump. (see also Half-amon) A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    AMONST THE MIDDLINS
    adv. phr. In pretty good health. "Well, Master Tumber, how be you gettin' on now?" "Oh, I be amongst the middlins!"
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    AMPER amp-ur n. A tumour or swelling; a blemish ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    AMPERY amp-uri adj. Weak; unhealthy; beginning to decay, especially applied to cheese. (see also Hampery.) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 3
    AN
    prep (1) Frequently used for of. "What do you think an't?" "Well, I thinks I wunt have no more an't."
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 3
    AN
    prep. (2) On. "Put your hat an." "An" was the genuine West-Saxon or Southern form of "on", (it is also the Old Saxon form). They joined it to nouns and adjectives, as we now do, but like our article 'an', it became 'a' when used before a word commencing with a consonant. Thus they said "an eve", "an urth", "an east", for "in the evening, on the earth, in the east"; but "afoot, afire, aright". It was employed more frequently than at present, and nothing is more common than "a summer", "a winter"," a land", "a water", "a first" , "a last" for in winter etc.
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 9
    ANDIRONS and-eirnz
    n.pl. The dogs, brand-irons, or cob-irons placed on either side of an open wood fire to keep the brands in the places. Called end-irons in the marginal reading of Ezek.Ch 40 v 43 (see also Brand-irons, Cob-irons, Firedogs)
    A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    ANENTS unents- prep. Against; opposite; over-against. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    ANEWST unents- adv Over-against; near. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    ANNIT
    Corruption of "Is it not" or "Isn't it", into the slang term "Aint it", and moulded into the Wealden brogue as "Annit". "Look at that rainbow, mairt. Annit a wonderful soight!" Another corrupt form is Ennet, though this word is not used as commonly as Annit. These words should not be confused with Ammet and Emmet, well-known Wealden dialect words meaning the insect Ant.
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 2
    ANOINTED unoi-ntid adj. Mischievous; troublesome. "He's a proper anointed young rascal," occasionally
    enlarged to: "The devil's own anointed young rascal." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    ANOTHER-WHEN
    adv. Another time. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    ANTHONY-PIG ant-uni pig
    n. The smallest pig of the litter, supposed to be the favourite, or at any rate the one which requires most care, and peculiarly under the protection of St. Anthony. (see also Dannel, Dan'l, Runt)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 4
    ANVIL-CLOUDS
    n.pl. White clouds shaped somewhat like a blacksmith's anvil, said to denote rain.
    A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    APS aps- n. (1) An asp or aspen tree (see also Eps) A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    APS aps- n. (2) A viper. "The pison of apses is under their lips." A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    AQUABOB ai-kwa'bob n. An icicle (See also Cobble, Cock-bell, Cog-bell, Icily) A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    ARBER aa-ber n. Elbow. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    ARBITRY aa-bitri adj. Hard; greedy; grasping; short for arbitrary. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    AREAR u'ree-r adj. Reared-up; upright ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    ARKIES
    n.pl Ears. One ear is an Arkie. "Aint young Jesse got big arkies." "You want to open your arkies a bit more then you'd hear what I'm a'saying of to ye!" "I've got a painful cold in my left arkie." (see also Weekers)
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 2
    ARRANT
    n. An errand. "To get an arrant" - to go on an errand, i.e. for groceries, etc. - Plumstead, West Kent. L.R.A.G. 1920's.
    Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977) Page 4
    ARRIV ANCE urei-vuns n. Origin; birthplace. "He lives in Faversham town now, but he's a low hill (below-hill)
    man by arrivance." (see also Rivance) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 4
    ARTER aa-tur prep. After. "Jack and Jill went up the hill To fetch a pail of water; Jack fell down and broke
    his crown, And Jill came tumbling arter." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    AS
    Is often used redundantly. "I can only say as this - I done the best I could." find it's as how it is."
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    ASHEN-KEYS ash-nkee-z n.pl. The clustering seeds of the ash tree; so called, from their resemblance to a bunch of keys. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 4
    ASIDE usei-d prep. By the side of. "I stood aside him all the time." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 4
    ASPRAWL usprau-l adj. Gone wrong. "The pig-trade's all asprawl now." A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888) Page 4
    ASTRE aast-ur n. A hearth. Lambarde - Perambulation of Kent, Ed. 1596, p 562, states, that in his time
    this word was nearly obsolete in Kent, through still retained in Shropshire and other parts.
    A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    AUGUST-BUG au-gust-bug- n A beetle somewhat smaller than the May-bug or July bug A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    AV
    prep. Of. "I ha'ant heerd fill nor fall av him." A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    AWHILE u'wei-l adv. For a while. "He wunt be back yet awhile, I lay." A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    AWLIN au-ln, au-n n. A French measure of length, equaling 5ft. 7ins, used in measuring nets A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    AX
    n. (1) The Axel-tree (see also Yax) A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    AX
    vb. (2) To ask. This is a transposition - aks for ask, as waps for wasp, haps for hasp, etc. "I axed him if this was the way to Borden." "Where of the seyde acomptantis ax alowance as hereafter foloyth." - Accounts of the Churchwardens of St Dunstan's, Canterbury.
  • B
    B
    BACCA
    n. Tobacco; foreshortened word, with the O corrupted to A. "Gies (give us) a nip o' bacca, George. I'm fair run right out moiself." (see also Barker)
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 5
    BACKENING bak-uning n. A throwing back; a relapse; a hindrance ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    BACKER bak-ur n. A porter; a carrier; an unloader. A word in common use at the docks. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    BACK-OUT bak-out n. A backyard. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    BACKPART bak-paart
    n. The back, where part is really redundant. "I shall be glad to see the backpart of you," i.e. to get you gone. " I will take away Mine hand and thou shalt see My backparts; but My face shall not be seen." - Ex.odus Ch 33 v 23
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 5
    BACKSIDE bak-seid
    n. A yard at the back of a house. 1590 - 1592 - "It'm allowed to ffrencham for mendinge of a gutter, and pavement in his backside . . .. 19d." - Sandwich Book of Orphans. 1611 - "And he led the flock to the backside of the desert" - Exodus Ch 3 v 1 (see also Backway)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 6
    BACKSTAY bak-stai n. (1) The flat piece of wood put on the feet in the manner of a snow-shoe, and used by the
    inhabitants of Romney Marsh to cross the shingle at Dungeness. (see also Backsters) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 6
    BACKSTAY bak-stai n. (2) A stake driven in to support a raddle-fence. (see also Backsters) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 6
    BACKSTERS bak-sturz
    n. The flat piece of wood put on the feet in the manner of a snow-shoe, and used by the inhabitants of Romney Marsh to cross the shingle at Dungeness. A stake driven in to support a raddle-fence. (see also Backstay 1, Backstay 2)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 6
    BACKWAY bak-wai n. The yard or space at the back of a cottage (see also Backside) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 6
    BAG
    vb. To cut with a bagging-hook. 1677 - The working-man taking a hook in each hand, cut (the pease) with his right hand, and rolls them up with that in his left, which they call bagging the pease. - Plot, Oxfordshire 256
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 6
    BAGGING-HOOK bag-ing-houk
    n. A curved cutting implement, very like a sickle, or reaping hook, but with a square, instead of a pointed end. It is used for cutting hedges, etc. The handle is not in the same plane as the hook itself, but parallel to it, thus enabling those who use it to keep their hands clear of the hedge. (see also Brishing-hook)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 6
    BAIL bail n. The handle of a pail, bucket, or kettle. A cake-bail is the tin or pan in which a cake is
    baked. (see also Baile) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 6
    BAILE
    n. "Item Nine milke truggs, one cheese baile and fallower and one milke payle ... 8s 6d" Will of John Bateman of Greenway Court, Hollingbourne, 1681 (KAO Pre 27/29/86). (see also Bail)
    Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977) Page 6
    BAILY bai-li
    n. (1) A court within a fortress. The level green place before the court at Chilham Castle, i.e. between the little court and the street, is still so called. They have something of this sort at Folkestone, and they call it the bale (bail). The Old Bailey in London, and the New Bailey in Manchester, must have been originally something of the same kind, places fenced in. Old French, baille, a barrier
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 6
    BAILY bai-li
    n. (2) Bailiff is always pronounced thus. At a farm, in what is called "a six-horse place," the first four horses are under the charge of the wagoner and his mate, and the other two, of an under-baily.
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 7
    BAILY-BOY bai-liboi n. A bailiff-boy, or boy employed by the farmer to go daily over the ground, and see that
    everything is in order, and to do every work necessary. - Pegge. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 7
    Page 11 of 378
    BAIN'T bai-nt phr. For are not, or be, not. "Surely you bain't agoin' yit-awhile?" ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 7
    BAIST baai-st n. The framework of a bed with webbing. - Weald. (see also Beist, Boist, Byst) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 7
    BAIT bai-t n. A luncheon taken by workmen in the fields (see also Tommy) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 7
    BALD
    adj Bold The Northumbrian dialect retained, as it still does, many pure Anglo-Saxon words containing the long sound of 'a', which the Southern dialect changed into 'o'. This word contained in the 'Ayenbite of Inwyt', 1340, resembles the Northumbrian form.
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 13
    BALD-PATES bau-ld-pai-ts n.pl. Roman coins of the lesser and larger silver were so called in Thanet, by the country
    people, in Lewis's time. (see also Borrow--pence, Dwarfs- money, Hegs pence)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    BALK bau-k n. (2) A cut tree. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    BALK bau-k n. (1) A raised pathway; a path on a bank; a pathway serving as a boundary. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    BALL SQUAB bau-lskwob n. A young bird just hatched. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    BALLET bal-et
    n. A ballard; a pamphlet; so called because ballards are usually published in pamphlet form. "Use no tavernys where the jestis and fablis; Syngyng of lewde ballette, rondelette, or virolais." - MS. Laud, 416, 104. Written by a rustic of Kent, 1460. "De books an ballets flew about, Like thatch from off the barn." - Dick and Sal, st.77'
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 7
    Page 12 of 378
    BALLOW bal-oa n. A stick; a walking stick; a cudgel. "Keep out che vor'ye, or ise try whether your Costard
    or my Ballow be the harder." - King Lear, Act 4 Sc 6 (first folio ed) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    BANNA ban'u phr. For be not. "Banna ye going hopping this year?" (see also Banner) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    BANNER ban-r phr. For be not. "Banna ye going hopping this year?" (see also Banna) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    BANNICK
    vb. To cuff, clout, or hit any person or animal. "Old Ed. 'e didn't arf give that old young 'un of Muss Week's a bannick on the ear for sarsin' him." "The eggler gave his old hoss a bannick across the knees with a faggot bat 'cause it tried to bite 'un." (see also Bannock)
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 5
    BANNICKING
    n. A good hiding. "By Gar! Old Cuttie didn't half give his boy a bannicking for smashing his bungalow window with that football."
    TheDialectofKent(c1950)
    BANNOCK ban-uk vb. To thrash; beat; chastise. (see also Bannick) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    BANNOCKING ban-uking n. A thrashing; beating. "He's a tiresome young dog; but if he don't mind you, jest you
    give him a good bannocking." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 8
    BANYAN-DAY ban-yun-dai n. A sea term for those days on which no meat is served out to sailors. "Saddaday is a
    banyan-day." "What do'ye mean?" "Oh! a day on which we eat up all the odds and ends." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 8
    BARBEL baa-bl n. A sort of petticoat worn by fishermen at Folkestone. (see also Barvel) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 8
    BARGAIN PENCE baa-gin pens n. Earnest money; money given on striking a bargain. . ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    BAR-GOOSE baa-goos n. The common species of sheldrake. - Sittingbourne. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    BARKER
    n. Foreshortened and totally corrupted form of Tobacco, as spoken by gipsies, pikeys and countryfied petty dealer types. "Dear beloved, kind sir, if you've a morsel o' barker in your pouch it would be much 'preciated, and may yer kind face never know sorrow, brother!" (see also Bacca)
    The Dialect of Kent (c1950)
    BARM baa-m n. Brewers yeast. (see also God's good, Siesin, Sizzing) A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    BARREL DRAIN barr'-l dreun n. A round culvert; a sewer; a drain. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    BARTH baa-th n. A shelter for cattle; a warm place or pasture for calves or lambs. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    BARVEL baa-vul n. A short leathern apron used by washerwomen; a slabbering-bib. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    (see also Barbel) Page 8
    BAR-WAY baa-wai n. A gate constructed of bars or rails, so made as to be taken out of the posts. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    BASH bash- vb. To dash; smash; beat in. "His hat was bashed in." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    BASTARD bast-urd n. A gelding. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    BASTARD-RIG bast-urdrig- n. The smooth hound-fish, mustelus laevis. - Folkestone. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    BAT
    n. (4) A heavy piece of wood, generally 2" in diameter, several of which are usually incorporated in a a well-made and honest sized wood faggot. The term is also used for any piece of wood of about 4 to 5 feet in length and not too wide iin diameter to hold in the hand and able to be wielded about.
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 4
    BAT
    n. (5) A use-pole, a brickbat, also in the compound, a three-quarter bat - R Cooke. (see also Use-pole)
    Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977) Page 8
    BAT bat
    n. (1) French, Bâton. A piece of timber rather long than broad; a staff; a stick; a walking stick. The old Parish book of Wye - 34, Hen 8. - speaks of "a tymber-bat." Boteler MS. Account Books cir. 1664 - "pd. John Sillwood, for fetching a batt from Canterb(ury) for a midle piece for my mill, 10s.0d." Shakespeare, in the Lover's Complaint, has, "So slides he down upon his grained bat," i.e. his rough staff. Some prisoners were tried in 1885, for breaking out of Walmer Barracks; when the constable said, "One of the prisoners struck at me with a bat;" which he afterwards defined as being, in this case, "the tarred butt-end of a hop- pole."
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    BAT bat n. (2) The long handle of a scythe. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    BAT bat n. (3) A large rough kind of rubber used for sharpening scythes. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    BAULLY bau-li n. A boat (see also Bawley) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    BA VEN bav-in
    n. A little fagot; a fagot of brushwood bound with only one wiff, whilst a fagot is bound with two. "The skipping king, he ambled up and down With shallow jesters, and rash bavin wits Soon kindled and soon burned" - Henry 4, Act 3 Sc 1. And "It yearly cost five hundred pounds besides, To fence the town from Hull and Humber' s tides; For stakes, for bavins, timbers. stones, and piles." - Taylor's Merry Wherry Voyage. (see also Bavin, Bobbin, Kiln- brush, Pimp, Wiff)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 9
    BA VIN bav-in
    n. A little fagot; a fagot of brushwood bound with only one wiff, whilst a fagot is bound with two. "The skipping king, he ambled up and down With shallow jesters, and rash bavin wits Soon kindled and soon burned" - Henry 4, Act 3 Sc 1. And "It yearly cost five hundred pounds besides, To fence the town from Hull and Humber' s tides; For stakes, for bavins, timbers. stones, and piles." - Taylor's Merry Wherry Voyage. (see also Baven, Bobbin, Kiln- brush, Pimp, Wiff)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    BA VIN-TUG
    n. A bobbin-tug. - J.H.Bridge to L.R.A.G. 1950's. (see also Bobbin-tug) Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977)
    BA WLEY bau-li
    n. A small fishing smack used on the coasts of Kent and Essex, about the mouth of the Thames and Medway. Bawleys are generally about 40ft in length, 13ft beam, 5ft draught, and 15 or 20 tons measurement; they differ in rig from a cutter, in having no boom to the mainsail, which is consequently easily brailed-up when working the trawl nets. They are half-decked with a wet well to keep fish alive. "Hawley, Bawley - Hawley, Bawley, What have you got in your trawley?" is a taunting rhyme to use to a bawley-man, and has the same effect upon him as a red-flag upon a bull - or the poem of "the puppy pie" upon a bargeman. (see also Baully)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 9
    BAY-BOARDS bai-bordz n.pl. The large folding doors of a barn do not reach to the ground, and the intervening space is
    closed by four or five moveable boards which fit in a groove - these are called bay-boards. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 10
    BAYER
    n,vb,& adj This words means BARE and also BEAR. In fact it covers all instances regarding these two words and is what I personally call a dialect collective-word. "Bayer (bear) with me Mary in moi sad loss!" "The autumn gales have blowed the trees bayer (bare)." "Scandlous it wor! Stud theer a- front o' the bedroom windy (window) as bayer (bare) as brass, the shamless Jezebel." "Oi saw one o' them 'Merican bayers (bears) up the Zoo in Lunnon town one time, mairt!." "Don't 'ee bayer (bare) down on that hosses head; let 'im walk free." (see also Burr)
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 5
    BE be
    vb. For are, am, etc. "Where be you?" i.e., "Where are you?." "I be comin'," i.e. "I am coming." This use of the word is not uncommon in older English; thus in 1st Collect in the Communion Office we have - "Almighty God unto Whom all hearts be open, all desires known, and from Whom no secrets are hid;" and in St Luke Ch 20 v 25 "Render, therefore, unto Caesar the things which be Caesar's, and unto God the things which be God's."
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 10
    BEAM
    n. Beam Dissyllabic pronounciation contained in the 'Ayenbite of Inwyt, 1340. 'This practice not only agrees with the present custom of the Frisians, but was, no doubt, that of the Anglo-Saxons.' (see also Byeam)
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 18
    BEANFEAST
    n. To have a beanfeast; to have a celebration. The workers in Woolwich Arsenal have an annual Beanfeast. - L.R.A.G.
    Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977)
    BEAN-HOOK bee-nhuok n. A small hook with a short handle, for cutting beans. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    BEARBIND bai-rbeind n. Bindweed, Convolvulus arvensis (see also Bearbine) A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    BEARBINE bai-rbein n. Bindweed. Convolvulus arvensis. (see also Bearbind) A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    BEARERS bai-rr'urz n.pl. The persons who bear or carry a corpse to the grave. In Kent, the bier is sometimes
    called a bearer. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 10
    BEASTS bee-sts n.pl. The first two or three meals of milk after a cow has calved. (see also Biskins, Bismilk,
    Poad milk) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 10
    BEA VER
    n. A word around which a certain amount of controversy has revolved. It has been pointed out that Beaver or Beevor, is a corruption from the French "Bouvoir", to drink. Actually Beaver, or Beevor, means breakfast. It is used hardly ever in the Weald, Mid-Kent, East Kent or within the three-mile almost pure dialect radius of the Kent town of Ashford. But it is used quite commonly in North-East Kent, and particularly in the Medway Towns of Chatham, Rochester and Gillingham. Almost all dockyardmen in the Royal Naval Dockyard at Chatham refer to their breakfast meal, partaken from 8.40a.m. to 9 am, as Beaver or Beevor. It may have originated in the Dockyards at Chatham, being used by French (Napoleonic) prisoners-of- war confined to the old prison hulks then moored near the dockyard and Upnor Castle. From the Medway Towns, over the last century it no doubt found its way deeper into Kent, penetrating to the Weald and beyond. On most old-established farms in Kent, the workmen, if living near home could have a "break" (an interruption) for their morning meal or breakfast, or if working on some distant part of the farmlands could partake of their Beaver or Beevor, in any sheltered spot they could find. The words Beaver and Beevor, seem to mean a rough, cold meal taken out in the open (the fields or woods or the roadsides) at breakfast time: when taken at home or in the farmhouse itself, then it was called breakfast, whether it was a cold meal or a warm one. "When we've ploughed another furrow Garge we'll knock off for our beaver." "It's too cold for beaver under the hedge: let's nip down to the old cart-lodge and have her in there out o' the wind a bit." (see also Beevor, Breckie)
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 8
    BECAUSE WHY bikau-z whei interog. adv. Why? wherefore? A very common controversy amongst boys:- "No it ain't" -
    "Cos why?" "Cos it ain't." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 10
    BECKETT bek-it n. A tough bit of cord by which the hook is fastened to the snood in fishing for conger-eels. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 10
    BEDEN
    n.pl. Petitions. Noun forming plural in 'en'. TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 19
    BEDSTEDDLE bed-stedl
    n. The wooden framework of a bed, which supports the actual bed itself. "Item in the best chamber, called the great chamber, One fayer standing bedsteddle, one feather-bedd, one blanckett, one covertleed." - Boteler Inventories in Memorials of Eastry, p 224, et seq. (see also Steddle)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    BEE-LIQUOR bee-likur n. Mead, made from the washings of the combs. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    BEETLE bee-tl
    n. A wooden mallet, used for splitting wood (in conjunction with iron wedges), and for other purposes. Each side of the beetle's head is encircled with a stout band or ring of iron, to prevent the wood from splitting. The phrase - "as death (deaf) as a beetle," refers to this mallet, and is equivalent to the esxression - "as deaf as a post."
    A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    BEEVOR
    n. Breakfast taken outdoors. The Dialect of Kent (c1950)
    bifoa-r'aaft-r A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    BEFORE AFTER
    adv. Until; after.
    (see also Beaver)
    BEHOLDEN bihoa-ldun vb. Indebted to; under obligation to. "I wunt be beholden to a Deal-clipper; leastways, not if
    I knows it." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 11
    BEIST
    n. A temporary bed made up on two chairs for a child. - Sittingbourne. (see also Baist, Boist, Byst)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 11
    BELATED bilai-tid n. To be after time, especially at night, e.g., "I must be off, or I shall get belated." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 11
    BELE
    vb. Boil. Old Kentish 'e' replaces Northern ' i' and Southern 'u'. Bele (K) = Bile (N) = Boil
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863)
    BELEFT bileft- n. For believed. "I couldn't have beleft it." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    BELLEN
    n.pl Bells. Noun forming plural in 'en'. TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863)
    BELOW LONDON
    phr. An expression almost as common as "The Sheeres," meaning simply, "not in Kent." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 11
    BEND
    Band. Use of 'e' for 'a'. Old Frisian bend=band; stef=staff; sterk=stark; weter= water. The 'Ayenbite of Inwyt', 1340, contains this word.
    The Dialect of Kent in the 14th Century. (1863)
    BENDER AND ARRS bend-ur-un-aarz n.pl. Bow and arrows. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    BENEN
    n.pl Prayers. Noun forming plural in 'en'. The Dialect of Kent in the 14th Century. (1863)
    BENERTH ben-urth n. The service which a tenant owed the landlord by plough and cart. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    BERBINE bur-been n. The verbena. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    BERK
    n. Bark. Use of 'e' for 'a'. Old Frisian bend=band; stef=staff; sterk=stark; weter= water. The 'Ayenbite of Inwyt', 1340, contains this word.
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 14
    BERTH burth- vb. To lay down floor boards. The word occurs in the old Parish Book of Wye - 31 and 35,
    Henry 8. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 11
    Page 20 of 378
    BESOM
    n (1) A besom, or besom-broom, is a small sweeping instrument composed of fine nut brushwood ends of a whippy character, tightened together and held in place by twisted thongs of the same material around a light bat or pole. This besom is used in lieu of a bristle broom by many cottagers in tidying up the outsides of their homes, and footpaths: it is used greatly by gardeners, especially in autumn when falling leaves are prolific upon the domains over which they have control. Another type of besom-broom, often found outside the back-doors of cottagers up to some twenty years ago was for wiping the mud off boots and shoes in bad weather instead of wiping the mud on to a mat, or to stomp it indoors when a cottager could not afford the luxury of a door mat. The larger besom was generally of the same construction as the smaller edition, and of the same basic materials (always of nut wood, be it minded!) and banded and held into position, not by nut wood thongs, but by light iron bands of an inch in width and lightly riveted. These bands were made beforehand and the broom was always a bit wider than the bands, so that when the bands where driven home over the brushwood they settled down and tightened up the whole into position around a strong bat of wood some two inches in diameter. The bands, usually three in number, graded the width of the broom, from the rather full and whippy bottom, to the less wide middle part up to the much narrower and very hardly held top section. The pole itself usually protruded a foot above the broom, and some fifteeen or eighteen inches below it. The upper part of the bat or pole was to hold onto to facilitate the brushing off of the footwear and the lower portion of the bat, pole or stake, which was sharp pointed, and driven well into the earth kept the large besom-broom in an upright position. "Give me the small besom so's I can swip up the leaves off the path." "Now you go outside at once you naughty, dirty boy and wipe them muddy boots of yours on the besom."
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 6
    BESOM
    n. (2) A naughty child "My young Katie be a rare little besom, a'rollicking and a'rellocking over everything." "Did you ever see such a young besom? He's gone and pulled up all o' his fayther's (father's) spring onions." "They're such little besoms around the house, that I shall be mighty glad when the school-holidays are over."
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 8
    BESOM
    n. (3) A maiden of peculiar temperament, or questionable character. "She's a bit of a besom, be young Sarah; always a'playing around with the boys, and she be only fourteen." "That young woman down the lane never does any work, but she can afford more fags than a hard- working man: and look at the fashions she wears! always donged up in the height of it! I say she's no cop. Between you and me Missis, she's a lazy, crafty, no-good besom of a woman."
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 8
    BEST
    vb. To best or get the better of. "I shall best ye." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 11
    Page 21 of 378
    BESTID bistid- adj. Destitute; forlorn; in evil case. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 11
    BESTLE
    vb. Bustle. Old Kentish 'e' replaces Northern ' i' and Southern 'u'. Bestle (K) = Bustle (S) TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 15
    BESY
    adj. Busy. Old Kentish 'e' replaces Northern ' i' and Southern 'u'. Besy (K) = Busy (S) TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 15
    BET
    vb. To beat. "Martha! Yur bet up them eggsies at once, so's we kin get on with the big cake." "Young Jim thought he could fight summat (something) good, but that there Harry Pile bet (beat) him easy as shelling pea-hucks." "Aye! and we bet Bonypart; an' we bet old Kaiser Bill an' we bet old Hatler (Hitler) an we kin bet them Russhies, too, surelye!"
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 10
    BETTER-MOST
    adj. Best or Superior. "That be a foine sow you have there master. It must be the better-most pig around these parts." "Your frock aint as nice as mine, young Mary: mine be the better- most one." "I be the better-most fighter in our school, and I can bet (beat) any an (of) ye yurr (here)!" (see also Bettermy)
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 9
    BETTERMY bet-urmi adj. Superior; used for "bettermost." "They be rather bettermy sort of folk." (see also Better-
    most) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 12
    BEVER bee-vur n. A slight meal, not necessarily accompanied by drink, taken between breakfast and dinner,
    or between dinner and tea. (see also Elevenses, Leavener, Progger, Scran) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    BEVET
    n. A bevet of bees. Testamenta Cantiana, East Kent section, p 84 Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977)
    BIB bib n. Name among Folkestone fishermen for the pouter. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    BIBBER bib-ur vb. To tremble. "I saw his under lip bibber." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    Page 12
    Page 12 vb. To stay. "Just you let that bide," i.e. let it be as it is, and don't meddle with it.
    BIDE bei-d ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    BIER-BALKS bee-r-bauks n.pl Church ways or paths, along which a bier and coffin may be carried. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    BIGAROO big-ur'oo n. The whiteheart cherry. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    BILBOW
    n. A framework for holding cows during milking. Bilboa, see Shakespeare. - R Cooke. Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977) Page 12
    BILLET bil-it n. A spread bat or swingle bar, to which horses' traces are fastened. (see also Gig, Spread-
    bat) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    BIN
    n. Hop bin, for collecting picked hops in West Kent. - L.R.A.G. Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977)
    BINDER bei-ndur
    n. A long stick used for hedging; a long, piable stick of any kind; thus, walnuts are thrashed with a binder. Also applied to the sticks used in binding on the thatch of houses ot stacks. "They shouted fire, and when Master Wood poked his head out of the top room window, they hit him as hard as they could with long binders, and then jumped the dyke, and hid in the barn."
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 12
    BING-ALE bing-ail n. Ale given at a tithe feast. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 12
    BIRDES NESTES bir-diz nes-tiz n.pl. Birds' nests. This old-world phrase was constantly used some years back by some of the
    ancients of Eastry, who have now adopted the more modern pronounciation. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 12
    BISHOP'S-FINGER
    n. A guide post; so called, according to Pegge, because it shows the right way, but does not go therein. (see also Pointing-post)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 12
    BISKINS bisk-inz n.pl. In East Kent, they so call the two or three first meals of milk after the cow has calved.
    (see also Beasts, Bismilk, Poad Milk) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 13
    BISMILK bis-milk n. In East Kent, they so call the two or three first meals of milk after the cow has calved. (see
    also Beasts, Biskins, Poad Milk) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 13
    BLACKBRINDS
    n.pl.Oak trees, less than 6 inches in diameter, or 24 inches in circumference allowing for bark. Over these sizes the oaks are called oak timber. Blackbrinds are used greatly for fencing work, etc., and particularly for the making of good stout posts. (see also Black-rind)
    TheDialectofKent(c1950)
    BLACKIE blak-I n. A black-bird - Sittingbourne ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    BLACK-RIND blak-reind n. A small oak that does not develop to any size. "Them blackrinds won't saw into timber,
    but they''ll do for postes." (see also Blackbrinds) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    BLACK-TAN blak-tan n. Good for nothing. "Dat dare pikey is a regler black-tan." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    BLAR blaar vb. To bellow; to bleat; to low. "The old cow keeps all-on blaring after her calf." (see also
    Blare) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 13
    BLARE blair vb. To bellow; to bleat; to low. "The old cow keeps all-on blaring after her calf." (see also
    Blar) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 13
    BLA W
    vb. Blow. The Northumbrian dialect retained, as it still does, many pure Anglo-Saxon words containing the long sound of 'a', which the Southern dialect changed into 'o'. This word contained in the 'Ayenbite of Inwyt', 1340, resembles the Northumbrian form.
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863)
    BLEAT bleet adj. (1) Bleak ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    BLEAT
    adj. (2) Corruption of bleak, cold, cheerless. "She adn't got a fire in her kitchen and it was quite bleat in there." "It's a bleat-looking day, sir. Cold and huvvery (shivery), and all likelihood o' rain 'fore the artnoon's out." - Wealden.
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 12
    BLEAT-WIND
    n. Corruption of Bleak Wind. A very cold, penetrating wind. A north-east or easterly wind. "That wind from the aist (east) blows right through ye a-coming across the old Ley. Real bleat it be!" "Come inside out o' that bleat wind Jess, and have a mug o' tea to warm ye up a bit: you kin finish a-chopping up they faggots arterwards." "Even with this thick old coat o' mine I'm a-wearing today, I can't keep out that there bleat-wind. Cuts right through a body and chills yer innards right sick" - Wealden.
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 13
    BLEDDER
    n. Bladder. Use of 'e' for 'a'. Old Frisian bend=band; stef=staff; sterk=stark; weter= water. The ' Ayenbite of Inwyt', 1340, contains this word.
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863)
    BLEND
    adj. Blind. Old Kentish 'e' replaces Northern ' i' and Southern 'u'. TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863)
    Blend (K) = Blind (N) Page 15
    BLEST
    n. Blast. Use of 'e' for 'a'. Old Frisian bend=band; stef=staff; sterk=stark; weter= water. The' Ayenbite of Inwyt', 1340, contains this word.
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 14
    BLETHER
    vb. To talk a lot of nonsence. The trouble with this word is that it is recognised English and an English Dictionary word. But people in the Weald of Kent strenuously deny that Blether is any other than of Kentish dialect origin. Blethering is often heard in the Weald of Kent and, of course, has connections with "to blether". Yet again, argument mars its lead, this time over Blethering, for Blethering is most definitely a piece of Irish dialect, confined to Co. Galway. In the ordinary way of talking, the word Blether has been corrupted to Blithering, and quite possibly the corruption Blithering has been altered, though still corrupt, by Kentish brogue to these words, Blether and Blethering. "Hark to him blether, the ow'd fool. Blethering all the time he be 'bout summat or t'other." "Shet (shut) your blethering you numb-skull. They made a monkey out of ye instead of a schollard (scholar) 'Plushy' Skinner!" "Blether, blether, blether all the time! It's a wonder where you get all that nonsense from to talk about. Even parson don't carry on quite as bad as 'e." Special Note:- Since starting this second volume, I was able, while on a visit to Egerton and Mundy Bois, near Ashford to pin-point the true Kentish meaning of Blether. After this quite recent research into this puzzling word I am now definitely of the opinion that, in its particular way it is of Kentish Weald dialect origin but only because of altered meaning of the English word Blether, caused possibly by the mis- conception of some person or persons, in the distant past, once the correctness of Blether (To talk a lot of nonsense). In Kentish Wealden dialect it means to talk a lot, to "carry on", in a more or less angry manner. To be argumentative. To annoy a person with over-much talking. To make a lot of talk, of a seemingly unending nature, over some trifle of common
    knowledge, Uninteresting speech "Our old school gaffer (school master) will blether along for hours over nothing. Whoi only yes'dy he blethered all the first lesson on about smoking making you not grow up tall. Whoi my fayther tolt me that 'im and his brother Bill started chewing bacca when they was ten years old at school. Moi fayther and me Uncle Bill both nigh on six fut oigh (high), so I reckon our school gaffer be nothin' but a blethering old idjit, surelye!" "When you start to blether like that, kip yer temper. No need to lose yourself over what you don't rightly know the rights of." "Don't keep on blethering an it. I'm right and oi knows oi am. Your one o' they blethering argifiers, wot wont admit unself in the wrong." "When her ladyship opened up our Garden Fete I thot she would never stop her blether. All about our noble, hard-working modern farming generation etcetera! Parson 'e say 'Most interesting. So educative to the rural mind.' "In'tresting!' oi says to parson. "Heddicative! Whoi in moi young days, 70 year agon, when oi wuz ten and left skule at eight yearn (years) it wuz FARMIN'! And hemmed (damned) hard work from 4 o'clock in the marnin' till 8 o'clock at noight, yayer (year) in, yayer out. Oi wuz Carter's mate, and our owd farmer 'e did pay Carter 12/6 a week for the two an' us - oi got the half-crown! Work! Don't make oi doi (die) o' larfing parson-sir, and her leddyship up there yender (yonder) on that there nostrum ( he meant rostrum) when everyone knows the yenger (younger) generation just sits on their backsides on a tractor an' ploughs: an' cows be milked by 'lectricity: an' chickuns aint allowed to 'atch their own iggs: and cows have calves by incineration (he means insemination), harvesting, an' carrying, an' stocking an' thrashing (threshing) all be done boi a contraption of mechanicle-ness with a crew of ile (oil) smelly young-uns that ye cairn't tell t'other from which, kaze (because) the men they dresses more loike goils (girls) and them hiking hussies (flirting females) adongs (dresses) up like the man! Noble - 'ard-working - surelye parson-sir that be the most awfullester blether oi ever heard. Good arternoon!"
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 11
    BLEWITS
    n. Tricholoma undum. - so called in Plumstead, West Kent. L.R.A.G. 1925-35.
    Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977)
    BLIGH blei adj. Lonely; dull ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    BLISSEN
    n.pl Blisses. Noun forming plural in 'en'. TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863)
    BLIV
    vb. Corruption of 'Believe'. Believe; believed "I bliv I haant caught sight of him dis three months." (see also Bluv)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 13
    BLOOD blud
    n. A term of pity and commiseration, In East Kent, the expression, poor blood, is commonly used by the elder people, just as the terms - "poor body," "poor old body," "poor soul," and "poor dear soul," are used elsewhere.
    A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    BLOODINGS blud-ingz n.pl.Black puddings A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    BLOOMAGE bloo-mij n. Plumage of a bird. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    BLOUSE blouz
    is a very common ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 13
    BLOUSE blouz n. (2) A state of heat which brings high colour to the face; a red-faced wench. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 13
    vb. (1) To sweat; perspire profusely. "I was in a bousing heat." expression. "An dare we strain'd an stared an bloused, And tried to get away; But more we strain'd, de more dey scroug'd And sung out, 'Give 'em play'." - Dick and Sal., st 71
    Page 28 of 378
    BLOUSING blou-zing adj. Sanguine and red; applied to the colour often caused by great exertion and heat, "a
    blousing colour.". ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    BLUE BOTTLES bloo bot-lz n. (1) The wild hyacinth. Scilla nutans. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    BLUE BOTTLES
    n.pl (2) Blowflies. - J.H.Bridge. Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977)
    BLUE SLUTTERS bloo-slut-rz n. A very large kind of jelly fish. - Folkestone. (see also Galls, Miller's-eyes, Sea-nettles,
    Sea starch, Sluthers, Slutters, Stingers, Water-galls) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 14
    BLUNDER blund-ur n. (1) A heavy noise, as of a falling or stumbling. "I knows dere's some rabbits in de bury,
    for I heerd de blunder o' one." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 14
    BLUNDER blund-ur vb. (2) To move awkwardly and noisily about; as, when a person moving in a confined space
    knocks some things over, and throws others down. "He was here just now blundering about." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 14
    BLUSTROUS
    adj. Blustering. "Howsomever, you'll find the wind pretty blustrous, I'm thinking." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 14
    BLUV
    vb. Corruption of ' Believe'. Believe; believed. " I bliv I haant caught sight of him dis three monts." (see also Bliv)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 13
    BLY
    n. (2) Look; feature. "This man has the bly of his brother" - He is like him at first sight . 'What is worth noticing is that the Kentish word is not the West Saxon or Southern form 'blee' or bleo (Anglo-Saxon bleo) , but the Old Frisian blie, bli.'
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 17 Page 29 of 378
    BLY blei
    n. (1) A resemblance; a general likeness. Anglo.Saxon bleo, hue. complexion. "Ah! I can see who he be; he has just the bly of his father." (see also Favour, which is now more commonly used in East Kent to describe a resemblance)
    A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    BOAR -CAT boa-rkat n. A Tom-cat. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    BOBBERY bob-uri n. A squabble; a row; a fuss; a set out. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    BOBBIN bob-in
    n. A bundle of firewood (smaller than a fagot, and larger than a pimp), whereof each stick should be about 18 inches long. Thus, there are three kinds of firewood - the fagot, the bobbin, and the pimp. (see also Baven, bavin, kiln-brush, pimp)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 14
    BOBBIN-TUG bob-in-tug
    n. A light frame-work of wheels, somewhat like a timber-wagon, used for carrying bobbins about for sale. It has an upright stick at each of the four corners, to keep the bobbins in their places. (see also Tug)
    A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    BOBLIGHT bob-leit n. Twilight. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    BO-BOY boa-boi n. A scarecrow. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    BOCLE
    n. Buckle. Use of 'o' for 'u'. Old Frisian; onder and op for under and up. TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863)
    BODAR boa-dur n. An officer of the Cinque Ports whose duty it was to arrest debtors and convey them to be
    imprisoned in Dover Castle. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 15
    BODGE
    n. (4) Alley bodge, used between rows of hops. - L.R.A.G. Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977) Page 15
    BODGE boj
    n. (1) A wooden basket, such as is used by gardeners; a scuttle-shaped box for holding coals, carrying ashes, etc The bodge now holds an indefinite quantity, but formerly it was used as a peck measure. 1519 - "Paied for settyng of 3 busshellis and 3 boggis of benys and a galon. . . 56d - MS. Accounts St John's Hospital, Canterbury (see also Trug, Trugg)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    BODGE boj n. (3) An uncertain quantity, about a bushel or a bushel and a half.
    corn to the stable." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    BODGE
    "Just carry this bodge of Page 15
    n. (2) A trug, or gardener's basket. Usually of wood and of a special construction and size. For other instances of Bodge see Volume on "Kentish (Wealden) Dialect" completed in 1935, the first of these works on the dialect of Kent. "Give me that there bodge young George so's I kin put enough o' these new 'taters in it for cook."
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 14
    BODILY-ILL bod-ili-il
    adj.phr. A person ill with bronchitis, fever, shingles, would be bodily-ill; but of one who had hurt his hand, sprained his ankle, or broken his leg, they would say: "Oh, he's not, as you may say, bodily-ill."
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 15
    BOFFLE bof-l vb. (1) To baffle; to bother; to tease; to confuse; to obstruct. "I should ha' been here afore
    now, only for de wind, that's what boffled me." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 15
    BOFFLE bof-l n. (2) A confusion; a blunder; a thing managed in a confused, blundering way. "If you both
    run the saäme side, ye be saäfe to have a a boffle." - Cricket Instruction. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 15
    BOIST boist n. A little extempore bed by a fireside for a sick person. Boist, originally meant a box with
    bedding in it, such as the Norwegian beds are now. (see also Baist, Beist, Byst) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 15
    BOLDRUMPTIOUS boa-ldrumshus, bold-rumshus adj. Presumptuous. "That there upstandin' boldrumptious blousing gal of yours came blarin'
    down to our house last night all about nothin'; I be purty tired of it." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 16
    BOLTER
    n. A young wild rabbit, until it attains the age of six months or thereabouts. The young of the tame or domestic rabbit are never referred to as such. "By gar! you should have seen the young bolters down by Park Wood in old Sir Henry Dering's time! Hundreds of 'em! Now look there today: if you can count a dozen young 'uns you'r mighty lucky, and it's the same with the pheasants; hardly nary (nearly) three brace in all thet wood.". "Young Charlie, my nibs, 'e do like running after they little bolters 'long the old Thorne Ruffets. Gits angry with his little old self de little old boy do when he finds he can't catch they no-how."
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 14
    BOND bond n. The wiff or wisp of twisted straw or hay with which a sheaf of corn or truss of hay is
    bound. "Where's Tom? He's with feyther making bonds." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 16
    BONELESS boa-nlus n. A corruption of Boreas, the north wind. "In Kent when the wind blow violently they say,
    'Boneless is at the door.' " ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    BONK
    vb. To hit on the head. Onometopoeic. (see also Bop (2) Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977)
    BOOBY-HUTCH boo-bi-huch n. A clumsy, ill contrived, covered carriage or seat. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    BOOTSHOES
    n.pl. Thick boots; half-boots. "Bootshoe high," is a common standard of measurement of grass. "Dere an't but terr'ble little grass only in de furder eend of de fill, but 'tis bootshoe high dere."
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    BOP
    vb. (1) To throw anything down with a resounding noise. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    BOP
    vb. (2) To hit on the head. "I'll bop you one." - Woolwich district. L.R.A.G. 1920's. (see also Bonk)
    Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977) Page 16
    BOROW bor-oa
    n. A tithing; the number of ten families who were bound to the king for each other's good behaviour. "That which in the West country was at that time, and yet is, called a tithing, is in Kent termed a borow." - Lambarde, Perambulation of Kent, p 27.
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 16
    BORROW-PENCE
    n.pl. An old name for ancient coins; probably coins found in the tumuli or barrows. (see also Bald -pates, Dwarfs- money, Hegs pence)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 16
    BORSHOLDER boss-oaldur
    n. A head-borough; a petty-constable; a constable's assistant. At Great Chart they had a curious custom of electing a dumb borsholder. This is still in existence, and is made of wood, about three feet and half an inch long; with an iron ring at the top, and four rings at the sides, by means of which it was held and propelled when used for breaking open the doors of houses supposed to contain stolen goods. (There is an engraving of it in Archaeologia Cantiana, vol 2 p 86.) (see also Bostler)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 16
    BORSTAL bor-stul
    n. "A pathway up a hill, generally a very steep one." (Perhaps from Anglo Saxon beorg a hill, stal a seat, dwelling.) Borstal Heath, acquired by the Metropolitan Board of Works for an open space in 1878, is situated in the extreme south-eastern suburb of London, and is one of the most beautiful spots on Kent, abounding in hills, ravines, glens, and woods. Snakes, owls, and hawks abound in its vicinity, and the Heath was formerly occupied by a pure race of gipsies. At Whitstable there is a steep hill called Bostal Hill. (see also Bostal)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 17
    BOSCHE
    n. Bush Use of 'o' for 'u'. Old Frisian; onder and op for under and up. TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 14
    BOSS-EYED boss-eid adj. Squinting; purblind. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 17
    Page 33 of 378
    BOSTAL bost-ul
    n. "A pathway up a hill, generally a very steep one." (Perhaps from Anglo Saxon beorg a hill, stal a seat, dwelling.) Borstal Heath, acquired by the Metropolitan Board of Works for an open space in 1878, is situated in the extreme south-eastern suburb of London, and is one of the most beautiful spots on Kent, abounding in hills, ravines, glens, and woods. Snakes, owls, and hawks abound in its vicinity, and the Heath was formerly occupied by a pure race of gipsies. At Whitstable there is a steep hill called Bostal Hill. (see also Borstal)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 17
    BOSTLER bost-ler n. A borsholder or constable. "I reckon, when you move you'll want nine men and a bostler,
    shaän’t ye?" (se also Borsholder) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    BOULT boalt vb. To cut pork in pieces, and so to pickle it. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    BOULTING TUB boa-lting tub n. The tub in which the pork is pickled. 1600 - "Item in the Buntinghouss, one boultinge,
    with one kneadinge trofe, and one meal tub." - Boteler Inventory, Memorials of Eastry, p 228. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 17
    BOUNDS
    n. The phrase, no bounds, is probably the one of all others most frequently on the lips of Kentish labourers, to express uncertainty. "There ain't no bounds to him, he's here, there, and everywhere."
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 17
    BOUT bout
    n. A period of time; a "go", or turn. In Sussex, it answers to a "day's work;" but in East Kent, it is more often applied to a period of hard work, or of sickness, e.g. "Poor chap, he's had a long bout of it."
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 17
    BOY-BEAT boi-beet
    adj. Beaten by a person younger than oneself. "My father, he carried the sway at stack building for fifteen year; at last they begun to talk o' puttin' me up; 'Now I've done,' the ole chap says - 'I wunt be boy-beat;' and so he guv up, and never did no more an't."
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 17
    Page 34 of 378
    BOY-CHAP
    n. A young man. "You are only a boy-chap." - Lynstead. Peter Lambert. 1963. Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977) Page 17
    BRACK brak
    n. A crack; a rent; a tear,in clothes. 1602 - "Having a tongue as nimble as his needle, with servile patches of glavering flattery, to stitch up the bracks, etc." - Antonio and Mellida. "You tiresome boy, you! when you put on dat coat dare wasn't a brak in it, an' now jest see de state ids in!"
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 18
    BRAKE-PLOUGH brai-k-plou n. A plough for braking, or cleaning the ground between growing plants. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 18
    BRAKING brai-king vb. Clearing the rows betwixt the rows of beans with a shim or brake-plough. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 18
    BRAND-IRONS brand-ei-rnz
    n.pl.The fire-dogs or cob-irons which confine the brands on an open hearth. "In the great parlor. . . ..one payër of cob-irons, or brand-yrons." - Boteler Inventory, Memorials of Eastry, p 225. (see also Andirons, Cob-iron, Firedogs)
    A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    BRANDY COW band-i kow n. A cow that is brindled, brinded, or streaked. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    BRAUCH brauch n. Rakings of straw. (see also Brawche) A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    BRA VE braiv adj. Large. "He just was a brave fox." A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    BRA WCHE brauch n.pl.Rakings of straw. (see also Brauch) A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    BREAD
    n. Bread. Dissyllabic pronounciation contained in the 'Ayenbite of Inwyt, 1340. 'This practice not only agrees with the present custom of the Frisians, but was, no doubt, that of the Anglo-Saxons.' (see also Bryead)
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 18
    BREAD-AND-BUTTER bren-but'ur
    n. In Kent these three words are used as one substansive, and it is usual to prefix the indefinite article and to speak of a brenbutter. "I've only had two small brenbutters for my dinner."
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 18
    BRECKIE
    n. The word Breakfast shortened and slightly corrupted. Usually used by parents, mostly mothers, to their young children. Used in a coaxing manner when trying to get the young kiddies and babies to drink and eat their first meal of the day. "Now children, hurry up with your breckie, and off to school the lot an ye!" "There's mother's little boy, den! Come now loike a good chappie and eat up your nice brekky." "I've eaten my fill o' breckie, grandma! Can oi get down now please?" (see also Brekky)
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 14
    BREDALE
    adj. Bridal. Old Kentish 'e' replaces Northern ' i' and Southern 'u'. Bredale (K) = Bridal (N) TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 15
    BREDGROME
    n. Bridegroom. Old Kentish 'e' replaces Northern ' i' and Southern 'u'. Bredgrome (K) = Bridegroom (N)
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 15
    BREKKY
    n. The word Breakfast shortened and slightly corrupted. Usually used by parents, mostly mothers, to their young children. Used in a coaxing manner when trying to get the young kiddies and babies to drink and eat their first meal of the day. "Now children, hurry up with your breckie, and off to school the lot an ye!" "There's mother's little boy, den! Come now loike a good chappie and eat up your nice brekky." "I've eaten my fill o' breckie, grandma! Can oi get down now please?" (see also Breckie)
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 14
    BREN
    n. Bran. Use of 'e' for 'a'. Old Frisian bend=band; stef=staff; sterk=stark; weter= water. The 'Ayenbite of Inwyt', 1340, contains this word.
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 14
    Page 36 of 378
    BRENG
    vb. Bring. Old Kentish 'e' replaces Northern ' i' and Southern 'u'. Breng (K) = Bring (N) TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 15
    BRENT brent
    adj. Steep. In a perambulation of the outbounds of the town of Faversham, made in 1611, "the Brent" and "the Brent gate" are mentioned. The Middle-English word Brent most commonly meant "burnt"; but there was another Brent, an adjective, which signified steep, and it was doubtless used here in the latter sense, to describe the conformation of the land.
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 18
    BRES
    n. Brass. Use of 'e' for 'a'. Old Frisian bend=band; stef=staff; sterk=stark; weter= water. The 'Ayenbite of Inwyt', 1340, contains this word.
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 14
    BRET bret n. (1) To fade away; to alter. Standing corn so ripe that the grain falls out, is said to bret
    out. (see also Brit) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 18
    BRET bret vb. (2) A portion of wood torn off with the strig in gathering fruit. (see Spalter, Spolt) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 19
    BRIEF breef adj. (2) Common; plentiful; frequent, rife. "Wipers are wery brief here," i.e. Vipers are very
    common here.' ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 19
    BRIEF breef
    n. (1) A petition drawn up and carried around for the purpose of collecting money. Formerly, money was collected in Churches, on briefs, for various charitable objects, both public and private; and in some old Churches you may even now find Brief Book, containing the names of the persons or places on whose behalf the Brief was taken round, the object, and the amounts collected. Public briefs (see Communion Office, rubrics after the Creed), like Queen's Letters, have fallen into disuse; and now only private and local Briefs are in vogue.,
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 19
    BRIMP brimp n. The breeze or gad fly which torments bullocks and sheep. (see also Brims, Brimsey) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 19
    Page 37 of 378
    BRIMS brimz
    n. The breeze or gad fly which torments bullocks and sheep. Kennett, MS Lans., 1033, gives the phrase - "You have brims in your tail," i.e. "You are always restless." (see also Brimp, Brimsey)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 19
    BRIMSEY brimz-I n. Kennett, MS Lans., 1033, gives the phrase - "You have brims in your tail," i.e. "You are
    always restless." (see also Brimp, Brims) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 19
    BRISH brish vb. To brush; to mow over lightly, or trim, 1636 - "For shredinge of the ashes and brishinge
    of the quicksettes . . . 6d. " - MS. Accounts of St John's Hospital, Canterbury. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 19
    BRISHING-HOOK
    n. A sickle or bagging hook. - Peter Lambert. 1970's. (see also Bagging-hook) Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977) Page 19
    BRIT brit vb. To knock out; rub out; drop out. Spoken of corn dropping out, and of hops shattering.
    (see Bret 1) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 19
    BROACH broach n. A spit. This would seem to be the origin of the verb, "to broach a cask," "to broach a
    subject." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 19
    BROCK brok n. An inferior horse. The word is used by Chaucer, Canterbury Tales, 7125. (see also
    Brockman, Brok) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    BROCKMAN brok-man n. A horseman. The name Brockman is still common in Kent. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    (see Brock, Brok) Page 19
    BROK brok n. An inferior horse. The word is used by Chaucer, Canterbury Tales, 7125. (see also
    Brock, Brockman) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 20
    BROKE broak n. A rupture. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 20
    BROND
    Brand. The use of 'o' for 'a'. The Old Frisian, which has been quoted in support of these forms has brond, hond, lond, for brand, hand, and land.
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 13
    BROOK bruok
    vb. To brook one's name, is to answer in one's disposition to the purport of one's name. In other places they would say, "Like by name and like by nature." "Seems as though Mrs Buck makes every week washin' week; she brooks her name middlin', anyhows."
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 20
    BROOKS bruoks n.pl. Low, marshy ground, but not necessarily containing running water or even springs. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888) Page 20
    BROOM-DASHER broom-dash-ur n. One who goes about selling brooms; hence used to designate any careless, slovenly, or
    dirty person. "The word dasher is also combined in haberdasher." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 20
    BROTHREN
    n.p. Brothers. Noun forming plural in 'en'. TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 19
    BROTTLE
    vb. Brittle. Wood that splits off easily is said "to brottle off well". - R Cooke. Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977) Page 20
    BROWN-DEEP brou-n-deep adj. Lost in reflection. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 20
    BROWSELLS brou-ziz n.pl. The remains of the fleed of a pig, after the lard has been extracted by boiling. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 20
    BROWSELS
    n.pl. This name is given to a dish of hard-cooked odds and ends of meat of all kinds mixed with fat, the whole forming a hard cake, difficult to break and extremely hard to chew. It is supposed, and quite possible is, very nutritive. This peculiar foodstuff was manufactured by the village butcher at Pluckley, a Mr G Homewood, over 30 years ago, though this dish has not been made for many years now, the memory of the word remains to this day. (see also Browzels)
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 4
    BROWZELS
    n.pl. This name is given to a dish of hard-cooked odds and ends of meat of all kinds mixed with fat, the whole forming a hard cake, difficult to break and extremely hard to chew. It is supposed, and quite possible is, very nutritive. This peculiar foodstuff was manufactured by the village butcher at Pluckley, a Mr G Homewood, over 30 years ago, though this dish has not been made for many years now, the memory of the word remains to this day. (see also Browsels)
    The Dialect of Kent (c1950)
    BRUCKLE bruk-l adj. Brittle. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    BRUFF bruf adj. Blunt; rough; rude in manner. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    BRUMPT brumpt adj. Broken; bankrupted. "I'm quite brumpt," i.e., I have no money. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    BRUNGEON brunj-yun n. A brat; a neglected child. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    BRUSH bruosh, brush
    vb. To trim hedges; to mow rough grass growing thinly over a field. "Jack's off hedge- brushing" 1540 - "To Saygood for brusshyng at Hobbis meadow. . . 6d." - MS Accounts St. John's Hospital, Canterbury.
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 20 Page 40 of 378
    BRUSS brus adj. Brisk; forward; petulant; proud. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 20
    BRUT brut
    vb. (1)To browse or nibble off young shoots. In the printed conditions of the sale of Kentish cherry-orchards, there is generally a clause against "excessive brutting," i.e. that damage so done by purchasers must be paid for.
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 21
    BRUT brut vb. (2)To shoot, as buds or potatoes. "My taturs be brutted pretty much dis year." (see also
    Spear (2) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 21
    BRUT brut vb. (3)To break off young shoots (bruts) of stored potatoes. (see also Spear (3) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 21
    BRYEAD
    n. Bread. Dissyllabic pronounciation contained in the 'Ayenbite of Inwyt, 1340. 'This practice not only agrees with the present custom of the Frisians, but was, no doubt, that of the Anglo-Saxons.' (see also Bread)
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 18
    BRYEST
    n. Breast. Exactly corresponding to Old Frisian. Usual Old English forms = Breost (breste). It is probable, from the forms bry-est, dy-epe, etc, that these words were dissyllabic
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 17
    BRYESTEN
    n.pl.Breasts. Noun forming plural in 'en'. TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 19
    BUCK buk
    n. (2) A pile of clothes ready for washing. It is now (1885) some 60 years ago since the farmers washed for their farm servants, or allowed them a guinea a year instead. Then the lye, soap, and other things were kept in the bunting house; and there, too, were piled the gaberdines, and other things waiting to be washed until there was enough for one buck. Shakespeare uses the word buck-basket for what we now call "a clothes basket." "Fal. . . . They conveyed me into a buck-basket; rammed me in with foul shirts and smocks, socks, foul stockings, greasy napkins. . . ." - Merry Wives of Windsor, Act 3 Sc 5.
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 21 Page 41 of 378
    BUCK buk vb. (3) To fill a basket. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    BUCK buk vb. (1) To wash. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    BUCKING CHAMBER buk-ing n. The room in which the clothes were bucked, or steeped in lye, preparatory to washing. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 21
    BUCK-W ASH buk-wash n. A great washing-tub, formerly used in farm-houses, when, once a quarter, they washed
    the clothes of the farm servants, soaking them in strong lye. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 21
    BUD bud
    n. A weaned calf that has not yet grown into a heifer. So called, because the horns have not grown out, but are in the bud. "His cow came to the racks a moneth before Christmas, and went away the 21 of January. His bud came at Michaelmas." - Boteler MS. Account Book of 1652.
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 21
    BUFF buf n. A clump of growing flowers; "a tuft or hassock." "That's a nice buff of cloves " (pinks). ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 22
    BUFFLE-HEADED buff-l-hed-id adj. Thick headed; stupid. "Yees; you shall pay, you truckle bed, Ya buffle-headed ass." -
    Dick and Sal, st.84. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 22
    BUG
    n&vb(3) To become outwardly irritable; to get upset very easily. "He's got the bug in him 'smarning has farmer." (He's in a very short-tempered state, this morning, is farmer). "It's no good getting buggy (irritable) with all the house over your old tuth-ache; woi don't ye get on your old grit-iron (bicycle) and cycle into Aishfort (Ashford) an' get it pulled out, you miserable old thing!" (see also Buggy)
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 15
    Page 42 of 378
    BUG bug vb. (1) To bend. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 22
    BUG bug n. (2) A general name for any insect, especially those of the fly and beetle kind; e.g. May-
    bug. Lady-bug, June-bug, July-bug. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 22
    BUGGY
    n&vb To become outwardly irritable; to get upset very easily. "He's got the bug in him 'smarning has farmer." (He's in a very short-tempered state, this morning, is farmer). "It's no good getting buggy (irritable) with all the house over your old tuth-ache; woi don't ye get on your old grit-iron (bicycle) and cycle into Aishfort (Ashford) an' get it pulled out, you miserable old thing!" (see also Bug)
    The Dialect of Kent (c1950)
    BULL-HUSS bul-hus n. The large spotted dog-fish. Scyllium catalus. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    BULLOCK bul-uk n.pl. A fatting beast of either sex. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    BULL-ROUT bul-rout n. The goby. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    BULL'S FOOT
    phr. "Don't know 'A' from a bull's foot" - unknown origin. J.W.Bridge. L.R.A.G. Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977) Page 22
    BUMBLE bumb-l vb. To make a humming sound. Hence, bumble bee, a humble bee. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 22
    BUMBLESOME bumb-lsum adj. Awkward; clumsy; ill-fitting. "That dress is far too bumblesome." "You can't car' that,
    you'll find it wery bumblesome." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 22
    Page 43 of 378
    BUMBULATION bumbulai-shn n. A humming noise. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    BUMBULUM
    n. See Camden, where it means a fart. Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977)
    BUNT bunt vb. (1) To shake to and fro; to sift the meal or flour from the bran. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    BUNT bunt vb. (2) To butt. "De old brandy-cow bunted her and purty nigh broke her arm." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 22
    BUNTING bunt-ing
    adj. (1) The bunting house is the out-house in which the meal is sifted. "Item in the chamber over the buntting house, etc." "Item in the Buntinge houss, one boulting with one kneading trofe, and one meale tub." - Boteler Inventory; in Memorials of Eastry, pp 225, 228. (se also Bunt 1)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    BUNTING bunt-ing n. (2) A shrimp. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    BUNTING - HUTCH bunt-ing-huch
    1600 - "Item in the ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 23
    BUONE
    n. Bone. 'The only examples of this kind (of pronounciation) that are to be found in the 'Ayenbite of Inwyt', 1340, are buone = bone, guo = go, guode =good, guos =goose.'
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 19
    BURR bur n. (1) A coagulated mass of bricks, which by some accident have refused to become
    separated, but are a sort of conglomorate. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 23
    n. A boulting hutch, i.e. the bin in which meal is bunted or bolted. buntting house, one Bunting hutch, two kneading showles, a meale tub with other lumber there prized at. . . 6s 8p." - Boteler Inventory; Memorials of Eastry, p 226.
    BURR bur n. (3) The blossom of the hop. "The hops are just coming out in burr." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 23
    BURR bur
    n. (2) The halo or circle round the moon is so called, e.g. "There was a burr round the moon last night" The weather-wise in East Kent will tell you, "The larger the burr the nearer the rain."
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 23
    BURR
    n,adj,vb. (4) A bear (the animal); bare (emply or naked); bear (to hold up, to hold) It is the Wealden brogue form with the rolling R, giving to it the unmistakable richness of this part of Kent's speech. "Look at they young-uns, a-bathing in the old hoss-pond as burr an they was born." "Taycher (teacher) tolt (told) us that polar-burrs be only found at the North Pole."
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 15
    BURY berr'-i n. A rabbit burrow. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 23
    BUSH bush n. Used specially and particularly of the gooseberry bush. "Them there bushes want pruning
    sadly." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 23
    BUTT but n. A small flat fish, otherwise called the flounder. They are caught in the river at Sandwich
    by spearing them in the mud, like eels. But at Margate they call turbots butts. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 23
    BY
    vb. To be. Exactly corresponding to Old Frisian. Usual Old English forms = Beon (ben). It is probable, from the forms bry-est, dy-epe, etc, that these words were dissyllabic. (see also Byenne)
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 17
    Page 45 of 378
    BY GAR
    interj. Corruption of the old oath "By God" used a great deal in the past but now dying out. Often heard in old-colonized parts of the USA and Canada where Kentish emigrants went with others on the covered wagon trails to find new homes across the Atlantic and to found villages and towns, that have retained in the more rural areas much of the Kentish brogue. The "By Gar" and By Garlly" have the Canadian and the US nasal twang in them by the ousting of the O by the A. The nasal changes are very noticable, though the Wealden dialect, fundamentally, remain. Most of my mother's people, the Piles of Pluckley, my great and great-great uncles took the new trails to help open up the New Far West over a century ago, when the great landrushes were on and also the gold-rushes, when California was taking shape, and the Red Indians still rode the land, burning, killing and plundering. They and many more of the old artisan families of the Kent Weald, took with them a far greater range of rich, uncorrupted dialect which today is more spoken in the rural districts from Leadville to Carson City, than where it first originated - the Kentish Weald, the Ashford Valley, and the countryside of Malmains and West Kent. (see also By Golly)
    TheDialectofKent(c1950)
    BY GOLLY
    inter. (see By Gar) TheDialectofKent(c1950)
    BY-BUSH bei-bush adj. In ambush, or hiding. "I just stood by-bush and heard all they said." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    BYEAM bye-am
    n. Beam. Dissyllabic pronounciation contained in the 'Ayenbite of Inwyt, 1340. 'This practice not only agrees with the present custom of the Frisians, but was, no doubt, that of the Anglo-Saxons.' (see also Beam)
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 18
    BYENNE
    vb. To be. Exactly corresponding to Old Frisian. Usual Old English forms = Beon (ben) It is probable, from the forms bry-est, dy-epe, etc, that these words were dissyllabic (see also By)
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863)
    BYSACK bei-sak n. A satchel, or small wallet. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    BYST beist n. A settle or sofa. (see Baist, Beist, Boist) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    BYTHE beith n. The black spots on linen produced by mildrew. (see Abited) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 23
    BYTHY bei-thi adj. Spotted with black marks left by mildew. "When she took the cloth out it was all bythy."
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
  • C
    C
    CACK
    n. Faeces. - Plumstead, West Kent. L.E.A.G. 1920's. Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977)
    CACKLE
    vb,n To laugh. Perhaps also 'talk' as in "cut the cackle". - L.R.A.G. Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977)
    CAD kad n. A journeyman shoemaker; a cobbler; hence a contemputous name for any assistant.
    "His uncle, the shoemaker's cad." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 24
    CADE kaid
    n. A barrel containing six hundred herrings; any parcel, or quantity of pieces of beef, less than a whole quarter. "Cade. - We John Cade, so termed of our supposed father. Dick - Or
    rather, a stealing of a cade of herrings." - King Henry 4 Part 2, Act 4 Sc 2 ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    CADE-LAMB kaid-lam n. A house-lamb; a pet lamb. (see also Hob-lamb, Sock-lamb) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    CADLOCK ked-luk n. Charlock. Sinapis arvensis. (see also Kilk, Kinkle (1) & (2) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    CAILES kailz n.pl. Skittles; ninepins. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    (see also Card) Page 24
    CAKE-BAIL
    n. A tin or pan in which a cake is baked. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 24
    CALIVER kal-ivur
    n. A large pistol or blunderbuss. 1600 - "Item in Jonathan Boteler's chamber fower chestes with certain furniture for the warrs, vis., two corslettes, one Jack, two musketts, fur one Horseman's piec, fur one case of daggs, two caliurs, fur with swords and daggers prized at. . . . . £4." - Boteler Inventory; Memorials of Eastry, p 225.
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 24
    CALL caul n. A word in every-day use denoting necessity, business, but always with the negative
    prefixed. "There ain't no call for you to get into a passion." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    CALL-OVER kaul-oa-vur vb. To find fault with; to abuse. "Didn't he call me over jist about." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    CALLOW
    n. (2) (see also Uncallow) Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977)
    CALLOW kal-oa
    adj. (1) Smooth; bald; bare; with little covering; also used of underwood thin on the ground. " 'Tis middlin' rough in them springs, but you'll find it as callow more, in the high woods." In Sussex the woods are said to be getting callow when they are just beginning to bud out. (see also Uncallow)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 24
    CANKER-BERRY kank-ur-ber-I
    n. The hip; hence canker-rose, the rose that grows upon the wild briar. Rosa canina. "The canker-blooms have full as deep a dye As the perfumed tincture of the roses." - Shakespeare - Sonnets, 54 (see also Haulms and figs)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 25
    CANT kant
    n. (1) A portion of corn or woodland. Every farm-bailiff draws his cant furrows through the growing corn in the spring, and has his cant-book for harvest, in which the measurements of the cants appear, and the prices paid for cutting each of them.
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 25
    Page 48 of 378
    CANT kant vb. (2) To tilt over; to upset; to throw. "The form canted up, and over we went." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 25
    CANT kant n. (3) To push, or throw. "I gave him a cant, jus' for a bit of fun, and fancy he jus' was
    spiteful, and called me over, he did." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 25
    CANTEL kant-l
    n. An indefinite number; a cantel of people, or cattle; diminutive of cant (1). A corner or portion of indefinite dimension; a cantel of wood, bread, cheese, etc. "See how this river comes me cranking in, And cuts me, from the best of all my land, A huge half moon, a monstrous cantle out." - King Henry 4 Pt 1, Act 3 Sc 1 (see also Kintle)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 25
    CANTERBURY-BELLS
    n.pl The wild campanula. Campanula medicus. The name is probably connected with the idea of the resemblance of the flowers to the small bells carried on the trappings of the horses of the pilgrims to the shrine of S. Thomas, at Canterbury. There are two kinds, large and small; both abound in the neighbourhood of Canterbury.
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 25
    CAP kap
    n. Part of the flail which secures the middle-band to the handstaff or the swingel, as the case may be. A flail has two caps, viz., the hand-staff cap, generally made of wood, and the swingel cap, made of leather.
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    CAPONS kai-punz n.pl.Red herrings. (see the list of Nicknames - Ramsgate) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    CAR kaa vb. To carry, "He said dare was a teejus fair Dat lasted for a wick;
    dat went dare, Must car dair shining stick." - Dick and Sal, st 8 ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    And all de ploughmen Page 26
    Page 49 of 378
    CARD kaad
    n. A barrel containing six hundred herrings; any parcel, or quantity of pieces of beef, less than a whole quarter. "Cade. - We John Cade, so termed of our supposed father. Dick - Or rather, a stealing of a cade of herrings." - King Henry 4 Part 2, Act 4 Sc 2 Lewis, p 129, mentions a card of red-herrings amongst the merchandise paying rates at Margate Harbour. (see also Cade)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 26
    CARF
    n. (2) Carf of hay. Dick staggered with a carf of hay, To feed the bleating sheep; Proud thus to usher in the day, While half the world's asleep. - Dick & Sal st 2.
    Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977) Page 26
    CARF kaaf
    n. (1) A cutting of hay; a quarter of a stack cut through from top to bottom. "Dick staggered with a carf of hay To feed the bleating sheep; Proud thus to usher in the day, While half the world's asleep." - Dick and Sal, st. 2 (see also Karfe)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    CARPET-WAY kaa-pit-wai n. A green-way; a smooth grass road; or lyste way. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    CARRY-ON kar-r'i-on vb. To be in a passion; to act unreasonably. "He's been carrying-on any-how." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 26
    CARTEN
    n.pl Carts. Noun forming plural in 'en'. TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 19
    CARVET kaa-vet
    n. A thick hedge-row; a copse by the roadside; a piece of land carved out of another. Used in the neighbourhood of Lympne, in Dr. Pegge's time; so, also, in Boteler MS. Account Books, there are the following entries - "The Chappell caruet at Sopeshall that I sold this year to John Birch at 5 0.0. the acre, cont(ained) beside the w(oo)dfall round, 1 acre and 9 perches, as Dick Simons saith, who felled it. "I have valued one caruet at Brinssdale at 7.0.0.the acre, the other caruet at 6.0.0. the acre." "The one caruet cont(ained) 1 yerd and 1 perch; the other halfe a yerd want(ing) 1 perch." (i.e. one perch wanting half a yard.) (see also Shave)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 26
    Page 50 of 378
    CAST kaast n. (2) To be thwarted; defeated; to lose an action in law. "They talk of carr'ing it into court,
    but I lay he'll be cast." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 27
    CAST kaast
    n. (1) The earth thrown up above the level of the ground by moles, ants, and worms, and therefore called a worm-cast, an emmet-cast, or a mole-cast, as the case may be. "Them wum- caastes do make the lawn so wery unlevel." (see also Castie)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 26
    CASTIE
    n. The accumulation of earth over the nests of field-ants, the Common Red Ant (Rubrus Formica); also the heaps of earth upturned by moles and the exhausted mould excreted by the burrowings of earthworms. "That field be just a rare mass of ammet-casties (ant casts). "They mole-casties be a-spoilin' the grass down in the old Prebbles' Hill Meadows." "Brish (sweep) off those worm-casties off the lawn young Henry, and obsarve that they do make wunnerful top soil, and the orls (holes) that they wurrums (worms) have made help to take fresh-air and water well down into the sile (soil)". (see also Cast 1)
    TheDialectofKent(c1950)
    CATER kai-tur vb. To cut diagonally. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    CATERWAYS kai-turwaiz adv. Obliquely; stantingly; crossways. "He stood aback of a tree and skeeted water caterways
    at me with a squib." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 27
    CAT'SBRAINS
    n. Ground overlying gravel with spots of sand in it. 1295, Hadlow Manor Rolls - Castebreye; 1433, Hadlow Manor Rolls - Cattysbrayn; 1465, Will of William Pawley of Hadlow - Great Cattysbrayn. - Wing-Commander W.V.Dunbreck, 1954.
    Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977) Page 27
    CA VING ka-vin n. (1) The refuse of beans and peas after threshing, used for horse-meat. - W.Kent. Called
    torf, toff in E. Kent. (see also Tauf, Toff, Torf) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 27
    Page 51 of 378
    CA VING
    n. (2) The refuse of beans and peas after threshing, used for horse-meat. - W.Kent. Called torf, toff in E. Kent. Also used of oats - J.H.Bridge (see also Tauf, Torf, Toff)
    Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977) Page 27
    CA WL kaul n. A coop. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 27
    CAXES kaks-ez n.pl.Dry hollow stalks; pieces of bean stalk about eight inches long, used for catching earwigs
    in peach and other wall-fruit trees. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 27
    CEREMONY ser-r'imuni
    n. A fuss; bother; set-out. Thus a woman once said to me, "There's quite a ceremony if you want to keep a child at home half-a-day. " By which she meant that the school regulations were very troublesome, and required a great deal to be done before the child could be excused. - W.F.S.
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 27
    CHALD
    adj. Cold. The Northumbrian dialect retained, as it still does, many pure Anglo-Saxon words containing the long sound of 'a', which the Southern dialect changed into 'o'. This word contained in the 'Ayenbite of Inwyt', 1340, resembles the Northumbrian form.
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863)
    CHALK WEED
    n. Lepidium Draba L. - Minster, Thanet. L.R.A.G. Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977)
    CHAMBREN
    n.pl Chambers. Noun forming plural in 'en'. TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863)
    CHAMPIONING champ-yuning
    n. The lads and men who go round as mummers at Christmastide, singing carols and songs, are said to go championing. Probably the word is connected with St George the Champion, who is a leading character in the Mummers play,
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 27
    Page 52 of 378
    CHANGES chai-njiz
    n.pl.Changes of raiment, especially of the underclothing; body-linen, shirts, or shifts. "I have just put on clean changes," i.e., I have just put on clean underclothing. 1651 - " For two changes for John Smith's boy, 4s. 0d. For two changes for Spaynes girle, 2s. 10d." - MS. Overseers' Accounts, Holy Cross, Canterbury.
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    CHANGK chank vb. To chew. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    CHARNAIL
    n. A hinge. Perhaps Char-nail, a nail to turn on. 1520 - " For 2 hookis and a charnelle 2p." - MS Accounts St Johns' Hospital, Canterbury. 1631 - "For charnells and hapses for the two chests in our hall." - MS,. Accounts St Johns' Hospital, Canterbury. (see also Charnell)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 28
    CHARNELL
    n. A hinge. Perhaps Char-nail, a nail to turn on. 1520 - " For 2 hookis and a charnelle 2p." - MS Accounts St Johns' Hospital, Canterbury. 1631 - "For charnells and hapses for the two chests in our hall." - MS,. Accounts St Johns' Hospital, Canterbury. (see also Charnail)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 28
    CHARRED chaa-d
    adj. Drink that is soured in the brewing. If, in brewing, the water be too hot when it is first added to the malt, the malt is said to be charred and will not give its strength, hence beer that is brewed from it will soon turn sour. The word charred thus first applies properly to the malt, and then passes to the drink brewed from it. To char is to turn; we speak of beer being "turned."
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 28
    CHART chaa-t n. A rough common, overrun with gorse, broom, bracken, etc. Thus we have several places
    in Kent called Chart, e.g. Great Chart, Little Chart, Chart Sutton, Brasted Chart. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 28
    CHARTY chaa-ti adj. Rough, uncultivated land, like a chart. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 28
    Page 53 of 378
    CHASTISE chastei-z vb. To accuse; to examine; cross question; catechize. "He had his hearings at Faversham
    t'other day, and they chastised him of it, but they couldn't make nothin' of him." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 28
    CHAT
    n. A rumour; report. "They say he's a-going to live out at Hoo, leastways. that's the chat."
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    CHATS chats n.pl. Small potatoes; generally the pickings from those intended for market. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    CHATSOME chat-sum adj. Talkative. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    CHA VISH chai-vish adj. Peevish; fretful. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    CHEAK
    n. Cheek. Dissyllabic pronounciation contained in the 'Ayenbite of Inwyt, 1340. 'This practice not only agrees with the present custom of the Frisians, but was, no doubt, that of the Anglo-Saxons.'
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 18
    CHEAP
    adj. Cheap. Dissyllabic pronounciation contained in the 'Ayenbite of Inwyt, 1340. 'This practice not only agrees with the present custom of the Frisians, but was, no doubt, that of the Anglo-Saxons.'
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 18
    CHEASTE
    n. Strife. Exactly corresponding to Old Frisian. It is probable, from the forms bry-est, dy- epe, etc, that these words were dissyllabic. (see also Chyaste)
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863)
    CHEE chee n. A roost. "The fowls are gone to chee." Hen-chee. (see also Gee (1) A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    CHEEGE cheeg n. A frolic. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 29
    CHEER cheer
    n. Constantly used in North Kent, in the phrase, "What cheer, meat?" as a greeting; instead of "How d'ye do, mate?" or "How're ye getting on?" ( Is 'What cheer'abbreviated to 'Whatyer'? L.R.A.G.)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 29
    CHEERLY chee-rli adj. Cheerfully. "The bailiff's boy had overslept, The cows were not put in; But rosy Mary
    cheerly stept To milk them on the green." - Dick and Sal, st 1. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 29
    CHEESE-BUGS chee-z-bug n. The wood-louse. (see also Mankie-peas, Monkey-peas, Pea- bugs, Peasie-bugs) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 29
    CHEESE-IT
    vb. A corruption of cease, or cease it: to stop; to desist; to cease worrying; etc. "Chiese (or cheese-it) will yer! Keep on a-throwing my bonnet over the idge (hedge). " "Chiese a- worrying! All will come aright. Remember what the old gaffer told us yayers ago - Rome wadn't builded in a day - nit (not) a yayer, neither." (se also Chiese).
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 18
    CHEF chef n. (1) The part of a plough on which the share is placed, and to which the reece is fixed. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 29
    CHEF
    n. (2) Chaff. Use of 'e' for 'a'. Old Frisian bend=band; stef=staff; sterk=stark; weter= water. The 'Ayenbite of Inwyt', 1340, contains this word. Old English - Caff.
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 14
    CHEQUER BERRIES
    n. Fruit of the service tree. Formerly sold as such in Maidstone Market, - Hanbury and Marshall, Flora of Kent. In Essex called "saars". There is a Chequertree Farm in Isle of Oxney. - Sedlescombe, Battle . M.P.Roper. 1972.
    Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977) Page 29
    CHERCHEN
    n.pl. Churches. Noun forming plural in 'en'. TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863)
    CHERRY APPLES cher-r'i ap-lz n.pl. Siberian crabs, or choke cherries. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    CHERRY- BEER
    n. A kind of drink made from cherries. "Pudding-pies and cherry-beer usually go together at these feasts (at Easter.) - Brand's Popular Antiquities, ed. Ellis 1. 180
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    CHIDLINGS chid-linz n.pl. Chitterlings. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    CHIESE
    vb. (1) A corruption of cease, or cease it: to stop; to desist; to cease worrying; etc. "Chiese (or cheese-it) will yer! Keep on a-throwing my bonnet over the idge(hedge). " "Chiese a- worrying! All will come aright. Remember what the old gaffer told us yayers ago - Rome wadn't builded in a day - nit (not) a yayer, neither." (see also Cheese-it)
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 18
    CHIESE
    vb. (2) Choose. Exactly corresponding to Old Frisian. Usual Old English forms = Cheose (chese). It is probable, from the forms bry-est, dy-epe, etc, that these words were dissyllabic (see also Chyese)
    The Dialect of Kent in the 14th Century. (1863)
    CHILLERY chil-uri adj. Chilly. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    CHILL-WATER chil-wau-tr n. Water luke-warm. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    CHILTED chilt-id pp. Strong local form of chilled, meaning thoroughly and injuriously affected by the cold. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 29
    CHINCH chinch vb. To point or fill up the interstices between bricks, tiles, etc, with mortar. - East Kent. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 29
    CHIP
    n. A small basket for containing strawberries, raspberries and other small soft fruits. - Mid- Kent. (see also Punnet)
    Notes on 'A Dictionary of Kentish Dialect & Provincialisms' (c1977)
    CHITTER chit-ur n. The wren. "In the North of England they call the bird Chitty Wren." A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    CHIZZEL chiz-l n. Bran. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    CHOATY choa-ti adj. Chubby; broad faced. "He's a choaty boy." (see also Chuff) A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    CHOCK chok vb. To choke. Anything over-full is said to be chock-full. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    CHOCKERS
    n.pl. Heavy footwear, of the hob-nailed, sprigged or steel-tipped variety of workmen's boots. "Look at his Chockers! They be worse than a warship with armour-plating." - North Kent. (see also Choggers, Choppers)
    TheDialectofKent(c1950)
    CHOFF chof adj. Stern; morose. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    CHOGGERS
    n.pl. Heavy footwear, of the hob-nailed, sprigged or steel-tipped variety of workmen's boots. "Hey sonny! Just you run over to my allotment and stomp down those big old lumps o' clay earth with your nice new Choggers." - North East Kent. (see also Chockers, Choppers)
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 19
    Page 57 of 378
    CHOICE chois adj. Careful of; setting great store by anything. "Sure, he is choice over his peas, and no
    mistake." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 30
    CHONGE
    Change. The use of 'o' for 'a'. The Old Frisian, which has been quoted in support of these forms has brond, hond, lond, for brand, hand, and land.
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863)
    CHOP
    vb. To exchange. A levelhanded chop is an even exchange. - R Cooke. Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977)
    CHOPPERS
    n.pl. Heavy footwear, of the hob-nailed, sprigged or steel-tipped variety of workmen's boots. With regard to the word Choppers, this is used only in the following sense, that the heavy boots are used to kick a person's feet from under them in a fight or brawl; or to hack or to trip a man in a game of football. To kick or hack - to chop; to cut Away, their supports, i.e. feet. A footballer, who has for the most part of his playing days been given to fouling other players by chopping them over with his chockers or choggers ( in this instance Football Boots), often gains the nickname of "Chopper" - like Chopper Brown, Chopper Lee, etc. "When 'Chopper' Lee saw the referee was blind to his position, he took advantage of it and chopped the rival centre forward's legs from under him, with his choggers." - North East Kent. (see also Chockers, Choggers)
    TheDialectofKent(c1950)
    CHOP-STICKS chop-stiks n.pl. Cross-sticks to which the lines are fastened in pout-fishing.
    make capital chop-sticks." - F. Buckland. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    CHRIST-CROSS kris-kras
    "Two old umbrella iron ribs Page 30
    n. The alphabet. An early school lesson preserved in MS. Rawl, 1032, commences "Christe crosse me speed in alle my worke." The signature of a person who cannot write is also so called. "She larnt her A B C ya know, Wid D for dunce and dame, An all dats in de criss-cross row, An how to spell her name." - Dick and Sal, st 57.
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    CHUCK
    vb. (2) To throw. - L.R.A.G. Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977)
    CHUCK chuk n. (1) A chip; a chunk; a short, thick clubbed piece of wood; a good thick piece of bread
    and cheese; the chips made by sharpening the ends of hop-poles. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    CHUCK-HEADED chuk-hed-id adj. A stupid, doltish, wooden-headed fellow. (see also Chuckle-headed) A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    CHUCKLE-HEADED chuk-l-hed-id adj. A stupid, doltish, wooden-headed fellow. (see also Chuck-headed) A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    CHUFF chuf adj. Fat; chubby (see also Choaty) A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    CHUFFED
    vb. To be pleased. - L.R.A.G. Notes on 'A Dictionary of Kentish Dialect & Provincialisms' (c1977)
    CHUFFER
    n. A very big, or hearty, eater. "By Golly! Our young Willum (William) can't half chuffer, He'll eat us out of house and home, surelye!" "He do chuffer life a pig, and with less manners, believe me."
    TheDialectofKent(c1950)
    CHUMMIE chum-I n. (1) A chimney sweep. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    CHUMMIES
    n. (2) House sparrows - The Kentish Note-Book 1, pp 300-1. (see also Chums, Sparr) Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977) Page 30
    CHUMS
    n. House sparrows - The Kentish Note-Book 1, pp 330-1. (see also Chummies, Sparr) Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977) Page 30
    CHUNK chungk n. A log of wood. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 30
    CHUNTER
    vb. To grumble. "Don't you dare chunter at me my gal: I'm yere mither (your mother) and I won't a-stand forrit (for it)". "All 'e do is chunter, chunter, chunter." "Stop your chuntering grandpa.! You've a good daughter to look after you since your poor Annie died. If you was in Hothfield Workhouse you'd have summat to holler 'bout. You be free to come and go. You can enjoy your pipe o' baccy, and go up The Street (The Street is the local name for the main road - or street- through a village in the Weald and Ashford districts), to the "Black Hoss" (horse) every evening for your pint of o' ale - so, stop a-chuntering, dan ye!"
    TheDialectofKent(c1950)
    CHURCHING
    n. The Church service generally, not the particular Office so called. now of afternoons?"
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    CHYASTE
    "What time's Churchin' Page 30
    n. Strife Exactly corresponding to Old Frisian. It is probable, from the forms bry-est, dy- epe, etc, that these words were dissyllabic. (see also Cheaste)
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 17
    CHYESE
    vb. Choose. Exactly corresponding to Old Frisian. Usual Old English forms = Cheose (chese). It is probable, from the forms bry-est, dy-epe, etc, that these words were dissyllabic. (see also Chiese)
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 17
    CHYEW
    vb. Chew. Exactly correspondoing to Old Frisian. It is probable, from the forms bry-est, dy- epe, etc, that these words were dissyllabic
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 17
    CLAD-HOPPERS
    n.pl. Name given by country people to large or heavy boots. "Young Bill ain't arf got a tidy pair of clod hoppers on today." "Stomp them large lumps of earth down with your clop- hoppers, Tommy." "Oi wants a payer (pair) of Sunday boots, not them there great clad-hopper things." (see also Clod-hoppers)
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 21
    CLAM klam n. A rat-trap, like a gin. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 30
    CLAMP klamp
    n. A heap of mangolds, turnips, or potatoes, covered with straw and earth to preserve them during the winter. It is also used of bricks. "We must heal in that clamp afore the frostes set in."
    A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888) Page 30
    CLAMS klamz n.pl. Pholades. Rock and wood-boring molluscs. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888) Page 31
    CLAPPERS klap-urz n.pl. (1) Planks laid on supports for foot passengers to walk on when the roads are flooded. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888) Page 31
    CLAPPERS
    adv. (2) To go very fast. "To go like the clappers." - L.R.A.G. Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977) Page 31
    CLAPSE klaps
    n. A clasp, or fastening. 1651 - "For Goodwife Spaynes girles peticoate and waistcoate making, and clapses, and bindinge, and a pocket, 0.1.8d." - Overseers' Accounts, Holy Cross, Canterbur.y
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 31
    CLAT klat
    vb. To remove the clots of dirt, wool, etc. from between the hind legs of sheep. (Romney Marsh) (see also Dag (1) (L.R.A.G. in 'Notes on A Dictionary of Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms' queries a connection between Clat and the Northumbrian Clart as in Clarty. Does Clayt (clay or mire) equal Clart.)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    CLAUEN
    n.pl Claws. Noun forming plural in 'en'. TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863)
    CLA VEL klav-l n. A grain of corn free from the husk. (see also Clevel, Clevels) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    CLAYT klaait n. Clay, or mire. (see also Cledge, Clite) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 31
    CLEAN kleen adv. Wholly; entirely. "He's clean gone, that's certain." 1611 - "Until all the people were
    passed clean over Jordan." - Joshua Ch 3 v 17. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    CLEANSE klenz vb. To turn, or put beer up in a barrel. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    CLEAPE
    vb. Call. Dissyllabic pronounciation contained in the 'Ayenbite of Inwyt, 1340. 'This practice not only agrees with the present custom of the Frisians, but was, no doubt, that of the Anglo-Saxons.'
    The Dialect of Kent in the 14th Century. (1863)
    CLEDGE klej n. Clay; stiff loam. (see also Clayt, Clite) A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    CLEDGY klej-i adj. Stiff and sticky. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    CLEPPER
    n. Clapper. Use of 'e' for 'a'. Old Frisian bend=band; stef=staff; sterk=stark; weter= water. The' Ayenbite of Inwyt', 1340, contains this word.
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 14
    CLEVEL klev-l
    n. (1) A grain of corn, clean and free from the husk. As our Blessed Lord is supposed to have left the mark of a Cross on the shoulder of the ass' colt, upon whom He rode at His triumphal entry into Jerusalem (St Mark Ch 11 v 7); and as the mark of a thumb and fore-finger may still be traced in the head of a haddock, as though left by St Peter when he opened the fish's mouth to find the piece of money (St Matthew Ch17 v 27), even so it is a popular belief in East Kent that each clevel of wheat bears the likeness of Him who is the True Corn of Wheat (St John Ch 12 v 24). As a man said to me at Eastry (1887) - "Brown wheat shews it more than white, because it's a bigger clevel." To see this likeness the clevel must be held with the seam of the grain from you. - W.F.S. (see also Clavel, clevels)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 31 Page 62 of 378
    CLEVELS
    n.pl. (2) Wheat grains "Look at they chevels; ain't they rare beauties? Seems we're going to have a fine wheat-harvesting this yurr."" - Wealden. (see Clavel)
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 21
    CLEVER klev-ur adj. In good health. Thus, it is used in reply to the question, "How are you to-day?" " Well,
    thankee. not very clever," i.e. not very active; not up to much exertion. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    CLIMBERS klei-murz n. The wild clematis; clematis vitalba, otherwise known as old man's beard. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    CLINKERS klingk-urz n.pl. The hard refuse cinders of a furnace, stove, or forge, which have run together in large
    clots. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    CLIP klip vb. To shear sheep. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    CLITE kleit n. Clay. (see also Clayt, Cledge) A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    CLITEY klei-ti adj. Clayey. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    CLIVER kliv-r n. Goose-grass; elsewhere called cleavers. Gallium aperine. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    CLODGE kloj n. A lump of clay. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    CLOD-HOE
    n. The clod-hoe of the Canterbury type is a medium shafted hoe with a heavy iron-head with two flattish prongs some six inches long, three inches in width between inner edges of the prongs. The prongs are usually half-an-inch wide, making an overall tilling capacity of four inches width. The clod-hoe of the Wealden type is a medium shafted hoe with a heavy iron- head with a single prong or blade, flat in character, about one and a half inches in width where is comes from the head, gradually broadening to approximately four inches at the cutting or tilling edge. Clod hoes are utility hoes, as they can be used for weeding, making furrows, banking up potato rows etc, and reversed, the heavy head will knock out the hardest clays to a fine tilth.
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 21
    CLOD-HOPPERS
    n.pl.Name given by country people to large or heavy boots. "Young Bill ain't arf got a tidy pair of clod hoppers on today." "Stomp them large lumps of earth down with your clop- hoppers, Tommy." "Oi wants a payer (pair) of Sunday boots, not them there great clad-hopper things." (see also Clad--hoppers)
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 21
    CLOSE kloas
    n. The enclosed yard, or fenced-in field adjoining a farm house. Thus, at Eastry we speak of Hamel Close, which is an enclosed field immediately adjoining Eastry Court. So, a Kentish gentleman writes in 1645: "This was the third crop of hay some closes about Burges had yealded that yeare." - Bargrave MS Diary. The word is often met with in Kentish wills; thus, Will of Thomas Godfrey, 1542, has, "My barne. . .with the closses in the same appertayning."
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    CLOUT
    vb. (3) To hit. - L.R.A.G. Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977)
    CLOUT klout n. (2) A clod or lump of earth, in a ploughed field. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    CLOUT klout n. (1) A blow with the palm of the hand. "Mind what ye'r 'bout or I will gie ye a clout on the
    head." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    CLOUTS
    n. (4) Clothes. - L.R.A.G. Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977)
    CLUCK kluk adj. Drooping; slightly unwell; used, also, of a hen when she wants to sit. "I didn't get up so
    wery early dis marnin' as I felt rather cluck." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 32
    CLUNG
    n. (2) Wet, unworkable ground, (? from Cling), otherwise called steelly. - R.Cooke. (see also Steelly)
    Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977)
    CLUNG klung adj. (1) Withered; dull; out of temper. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    CLUNK
    vb. To clump, as in "To clump about". This word, like so many others is of a bastard-dialect nature. It is neither pure dialect, or alteration through the brogue or a corruption. "Stop they clunking about the house in they clod-hoppers (heavy boots) you've got on." "It fell down clunk (fell heavily). " I'll gie ye such a clunk (hard blow) ower the head in a minute." "Don't 'ee clunk about young-un." Though this word is often used with regard to its relationship to heaviness, I have not actually heard it in regard to a clump i.e. a clump of trees, clump of flowers, clump of bushes..
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 20
    CLUTHER kludh-ur
    vb. (2) To make a noise generally, as by knocking things together. Used also of the special sound made by rabbits in their hole, just before they bolt out, e.g., "I 'eerd 'im cluther," i.e. I heard him make a noise; and implying, "Therefore, he will soon make a bolt." A variant of clatter.
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    CLUTHER kluth-r n. (1) A great noise. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    CLUTTER klut-r n. (1) A litter. "There's always such a lot of clutter about his room." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    CLUTTER klut-ur
    vb. (2) To make a noise generally, as by knocking things together. Used also of the special sound made by rabbits in their hole, just before they bolt out, e.g., "I 'eerd 'im cluther," i.e. I heard him make a noise; and implying, "Therefore, he will soon make a bolt." A variant of clatter.(see also Cluther 2)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 33
    COADCHER
    n. Cold-Cheer, meaning a cold meal, or a hot meal that has been allowed to grow cold. The Sussex dialect calls it Coadgear and it means exactly the same. "Hey, old ooman (wife) what does ye call this? Ivery (every) noight this cold-weather week oive only had coadcher to come 'ome to. Bread and cheese and pickles aint no meal for a wukkin (working) man this time o' yurr." "It may hev (have) ben hot when you made it mither (mother) but it be only coadcher now, anyways." - Wealden.
    The Dialect of Kent (c1950)
    COAL-SHOOT koa-l-shoo-t n. A coal scuttle. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    COARSE koars adj. Rough, snowy, windy weather. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    COB kob vb. To throw gently. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    COBBLE kob-l n. An icicle. (see also Aquabob, Cock-bell, Cog-bell, Icily) A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    COB-IRONS kob-eirnz
    n.pl And-irons; irons standing on the hearth, and intended to keep the brands and burning coals in their place; also the irons by which the spit is supported. "One payer of standing cob- yrons." . . . . "One payer of cob-irons or brand-irons.". . . . "Item in the Greate Hall. . . . a payer of cob-irons." - Boteler Inventories in the Memorials of Eastry. (see also Andirons, Brand-irons, Firedogs)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 33
    Page 66 of 378
    COCK-BELL kok-bel
    n. An icicle. The Bargrave MS. Diary, describing the weather in France in the winter of 1645 says, "My beard had sometimes yce on it as big as my little finger, my breath turning into many cock-bells as I walked." (see also Aquabob, Cobble, Cog-bell, Icily)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 33
    COCKER kok-ur vb. To indulge; to spoil, Ecclus.Ch 30 v 9. - "Cocker thy child and he shall make thee afraid." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 33
    COCKLE kok-l n. A stove used for drying hops. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 33
    CODDLE
    vb. To mess about or to fuss around. "Oh dear me, Annie! I wish you wouldn't coddle about the house on your half-day, but run off home to see your parents, or even go into the pictures in town for a couple of hours." "My old grandpa's always coddling about in his toolshed for something or other."
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 22
    CODDLER
    n. One who coddles, or fusses. "If there was ever a greater or more vexatious coddler than your fayther (father) ever born, I'd sure liken (like ) to see him.".
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 22
    COG-BELLS kog-bel
    n.pl. (1) Icicles. Lewis writes cog-bells; and so the word is so pronounced in Eastry. "There are some large cog-bells hanging from the thatch." (see also Aquabob, Cobble, Cock-bell, Icily)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 33
    COG-BELLS
    n.pl. (2) See Congbells (2). Cog-bells is merely the alteration of Cong to Cog - i.e. the dropping of the N through the habitual word-laziness of the Wealden folk.
    TheDialectofKent(c1950)
    COILER-HARNESS
    n. The trace harness. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    COLD koald n. In phrase, "Out of cold." Water is said to be out of cold when it has just got the chill off.
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    COLLAR kol-ur n. Smut in wheat. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    COLLARDS
    n.pl. Spring greens.- Nicky Newbury. 1973. Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977)
    COLLARMAKER kol-ur-mai-kur n. A saddler who works for farmers; so called, because he has chiefly to do with the
    mending and making of horses' collars. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 34
    COMB koam n. An instrument used by thatchers to beat down the straw, and then smooth it afterwards. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 34
    COMBE koom n. A valley. This word occurs in a great number of place-names in Kent. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 34
    COME kum prep. On such a day, or at such a time when it arrives. "It'll be nine wiks come Sadderday sin'
    he were took bad." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 34
    COMPOSANT kom-puzant
    n. The luminous appearance sometimes seen on the masts and yards of ships at sea, the result of electricity in the air. "Besides hearing strange sounds, the poor fisherman often sees the composant. As he sails along, a ball of fire appears dancing about the top of his mast; it is of a bluish, unearthly colour, and quivers like a candle going out; sometimes it shifts from the mast-head to some other portion of the vessel, where there is a bit of pointed iron; and sometimes there are two or three of them on different parts of the boat. It never does anybody any harm, and it always comes when squally weather is about. "Englishmen are not good hands at inventing names and I think the Folkestone people most likely picked up the word from the Frenchmen whom they meet out at sea in pursuit of herrings." - F. Buckland
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 34
    Page 68 of 378
    CONCLUDE konkleu-d vb. To decide. "So he concluded to stay at home for a bit." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 34
    CONE koan vb. To crack or split with the sun, as timber is apt to do; as though a wedge had been
    inserted in it. A derivative of Anglo-Saxon cinan, to split. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    CONE-WHEAT koan-weet n. Bearded wheat. (see also Durgan-wheat) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    CONGBELLS
    n.pl. (1) The drips of mucous from an inflamed nose or droplets of moisture that have made their way from the eyes when made to weep by cold winds into the nose and been exuded at the tips of the nasal organ. Cong is the further corruption of the slang Conk, or Nose. Bells is the name given to the drops of water or mucous which they are supposed to resemble! Thus Cong (conk; nose) - Bells (drips or drops).
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 22
    CONGBELLS
    n.pl. (3) The fruits of the grape-vine are also called congbells and I once heard a lad, who did not known what they were remark to the owner of the vine, "That I likes them little-ball- hangdowns, sir."
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 23
    CONG-BELLS
    n.pl. (2) Very short icicles hanging from trees, buildings etc. especially if they are dripping in a thaw. Also icicles formed by frozen breath on a man's beard or moustache. (see also Cog- bells)
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 23
    CONJURE
    vb,adj To be skilled in work; to be helpfull at work. "Yes, Peter. He is a very conjurable man. There beant (be not) a job on this farm that he can't do real good-like." "Ask old Harry to help us to conjure this sack of oats up onto the top o' this wagon." "Let him alone a-while and he'll conjure that old ile (oil) engine to go." "It was pretty to watch them thurr (there) ship dogs (sheep-dogs) conjure they ship (sheep) in to they folds."
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 22
    CONNIVER konei-vur vb. To stare, gape. "An so we sasselsail'd along And crass de fields we stiver'd, While
    dickey lark kept up his song An at de clouds conniver'd" ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    CONTRAIRIWISE contrai-r'iweiz adv. On the contrary. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    CONTRAIRY contrai-r'I adj. Disagreeable; unmanageable. "Drat that child, he's downright contrary to-day." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 35
    CONYGARTHE kun-igaarth
    n. A rabbit warren. Lambarde, 1596. - "The Isle of Thanet, and those Easterne partes are the grayner; the Weald was the wood; Rumney Marsh is the meadow plot; the North downes towardes the Thaymse be the conygarthe or warreine."
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 35
    COOCH-GRASS
    n. Triticum repens, a coarse, bad species of grass, which grows rapidly on arable land, and does much mischief with its long stringy roots. (see also Couch-grass)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 35
    COOL-BACK kool-bak
    n. A shallow vat, or tub, about 12 or 18 inches deep, wherein beer is cooled. "Item in the brewhouse, two brewinge tonns, one coole-back, two furnisses, fower tubbs with other. . . £6 14s. - Boteler Inventory, Memorials of Eastry, p 226.
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 35
    COOM
    n. Grease, after thickening on wheels etc and becoming worn out, is called coom. - R. Cooke.
    Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977) Page 35
    COOPEONS
    n.pl. Coupons. "Don't give up all they coopeons off the ration books this week. We may need some for next week if we can't get into town where's there a more variety of stuff to choose from that aint on the ration."
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 23
    Page 70 of 378
    COP kop vb. (2) To throw; to heap anything up . ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    COP kop n. (1) A shock of corn; a stack of hay or straw (see also Shock) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    COP
    vb. (4) To catch. "You'll cop it" Is there a connection between 'to cop' and 'copper' or policeman? - J. H.Bridge.
    Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977) Page 35
    COP
    vb. (3) To hit; and extension of 'to catch'. "He copped him one on the jaw." - Plumstead, West Kent. L.R.A.G.
    Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977)
    COPE koap vb. To muzzle; thus, " to cope a ferret" is to sew up its mouth. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    COPSAN
    n. Head of a sluice in Teynham Marshes. - Sittingbourne. W.C.B.Purser. 1935. Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977) Page 35
    COPSE kops n. A fence across a dyke, which has no opening. A term used in marshy districts. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 35
    CORBEAU kor-boa n. The fish Cottus gobio, elsewhere called the miller's thumb, or bull-head. (see also
    Miller's thumb) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 36
    CORD-WOOD kord-wuod n. A pile of wood, such as split-up roots and trunks of trees stacked for fuel. A cord of
    wood should measure eight feet long x four feet high x four feet thick. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 36
    CORSE kors n. The largest of the cleavers used by a butcher. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    COSSET kos-it vb. To fondle; to caress; to pet. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    Page 36 adj. Used of a child that has been petted, and expects to be fondled and caressed.
    COSSETY kos-iti A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    COST koast n. A fore-quarter of a lamb; "a rib". A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    COTCHERING koch-uring partc Gossiping. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    COTCHULL
    adj. Upset. "He be cotchull today. His wife be in the Cottage Hospital to have her young-un born." "If you aint a good boy, to your old grandma, you'll mak me rare cotchull, you will.".
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 24
    COTERELL kot-ir'el n. A little raised mound in the marshes to which the shepherds and their flocks can retire
    when the salterns are submerged by the tide. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    COTTON kot-on vb. To agree together, or please each other. "They cannot cotton no-how!" ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    COUCH-GRASS kooch-grass n. Triticum repens, a coarse, bad species of grass, which grows rapidly on arable land, and
    does much mischief with its long stringy roots. (see also Cooch-grass) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 36
    COUGE koag n. A dram of brandy. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 34
    COUPLING BAT kup-lin bat n. A piece of round wood attached to the bit (in West Kent), or ringle (in East Kent), of two
    plough horses to keep them together. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 36
    COURT koart
    n. The manor house, where the court leet of the manor is held. Thus, Eastry Court is the old house, standing on the foundations of the ancient palace of the Kings of Kent, wherein is held annually the Court of the Manor of Eastry (see also Court Lodge)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 36
    COURT FAGGOT koart fag-ut
    n. This seems to have been the name, anciently given, to the best and choicest fagot. 1523 - "For makyng of ten loodis of court fagot, 3s. 4d." - Accounts of St John's Hospital, Canterbury.
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 37
    COURT LODGE koart loj
    n. The manor house, where the court leet of the manor is held. Thus, Eastry Court is the old house, standing on the foundations of the ancient palace of the Kings of Kent, wherein is held annually the Court of the Manor of Eastry (see also Court)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 36
    COURT-CUPBOARD koart-cub-urd
    n. A sideboard or cabinet used formerly to display the silver flagons, cups, beakers, ewers, etc., i.e., the family plate, and distinquished from "the livery cupboard", or wardrobe. In the Boteler Inventory, we find that there were in the best chamber "Half-a-dowson of high joynd stooles, fower low joynd cushian stooles, two chayers, one court cubbard, etc." - Memorials of Eastry, p 225; and again on p 227; "In the greate parler, one greate table. . . one courte cubbard, one greate chayer, etc." "Away with the joint-stools, remove the court cupboard, look to the plate." - Romeo and Juliet, Act 1 Sc.5.
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 36
    COVE koav
    n. A shed; a lean-to or low building with a shelving roof, joined to the wall of another; the shelter which is formed by the projection of the eaves of a house acting as a roof to an outbuilding. (see also Coved, Coven)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 37
    COVED koa-vd
    adj. With sloping sides; used of a room, the walls of which are not perpendicular, but slant inwards, thus fowming sides and roof. "Your bedsteddle couldn't stand there, because the sides are coved." (see also Cove, Coven)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 37
    COVE-KEYS koa-v-keez n.pl. Cowslips. (see also Culver Keys, Horsebuckle, Lady-keys (2), Paigle, Pegle)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    COVEL kov-l n. A water tub with two ears. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    COVEN koa-vn adj. Sloped; slanted. "It has a coven ceiling." (see also Cove, Coved) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    COVERLYD kuv-urlid
    n. The outer covering of the bed which lies above the blankets; a counterpane. In the Boteler Inventory we find "In the best chamber . . . one fether bedd, one blanckett, one covertleed. Item in the lower chamber. . . . two coverleeds . Item in the middle chamber. . . a coverlyd and boulster." - Memorials of Eastry, p 224. (see also Covertlid)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 37
    COVERTLID kuv-urtlid
    n. The outer covering of the bed which lies above the blankets; a counterpane. In the Boteler Inventory we find "In the best chamber . . . one fether bedd, one blanckett, one covertleed. Item in the lower chamber. . . . two coverleeds . Item in the middle chamber. . . a coverlyd and boulster." - Memorials of Eastry, p 224. (see also Coverlyd)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    COW kou n. (1) A pitcher. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    COW
    vb. (3) To be afraid of. "He cowed at going down that well." - R Cooke. Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977)
    COW' kou n. (2) The moveable wooden top of the chimney of a hop-oast or malt-house. (see also Cowl) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 38
    COW-CRIB kou-krib n. The square manger for holding hay, etc., which stands in the straw-yard, and so is
    constructed as to be low at the sides and high at the corners. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 38
    COWL koul n. The moveable wooden top of the chimney of a hop-oast or malt-house. (see also Cow') ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 38
    COW-MOUTH
    adj. When the stub is left with an uneven cut, hollow in the middle, this is called a cow-mouth cut. - R Cooke.
    Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977)
    COW-PIE
    n. Pudding pie. - Rochester district. Nicky Newbury's grandmother. 1973. Pudding Pie)
    Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977)
    CRACK-NUT krak-nut n. A hazel nut, as opposed to cocoa nuts, Brazil nuts, etc. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    CRAMP-WORD
    n. A word difficult to be understood. "Our new parson, he's out of the sheeres, and he uses so many of these here cramp-words."
    A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888) Page 38
    CRANK krangk vb. (2) To mark cross wise. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888) Page 38
    CRANK krangk adj. (1) Merry; cheery. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888) Page 38
    CREAM kreem vb. To crumble. Hops, when they are too much dried are said to cream, i.e. to crumble to
    pieces. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 38
    CREET kreet n. A cradle, or frame-work of wood, placed on a scythe when used to cut corn. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 38
    CREFT
    n. Craft. Use of 'e' for 'a'. Old Frisian bend=band; stef=staff; sterk=stark; weter= water. The' Ayenbite of Inwyt', 1340, contains this word.
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863)
    CRIPS krips adj. Crisp. Formed by transposition, as Aps for Asp, etc. (see also Crup) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    CRIPT kript adj. Depressed; out of spirits. (see also Cruppish.) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    CROCK krok vb. (2) To put away; lay by; save up; hide. "Ye'd better by half give that butter away,
    instead of crocking it up till it's no use to nobody." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 38
    CROCK krok
    n. (1) An earthen pan or pot, to be found in every kitchen, and often used for keeping butter, salt, etc. It is a popular superstition that if a man goes to the place where the end of the rainbow rests he will find there a crock of gold. A.D. 1536 - "Layd owt for a crok. . . ." - Accounts of St. John's Hospital, Canterbury
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 38
    CROCK BUTTER krok but-ur n. Salt butter which has been put into earthernware crocks to keep during the winter. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 39
    CROFT krauft n. A vault. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 39
    CROSHABELL krosh-ubel n. A coutezan. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    CROUCHEN
    n.pl.Crosses. Noun forming plural in 'en'. TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863)
    CROW kroa n. The fat adhering to a pig's liver; hence, "liver and crow" are generally spoken of and eaten
    together. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    CROW-FISH kroa-fish n. The common stickleback. Gasterosteus aculeatus. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    CRUMMY krum-I adj. Filthy and dirty, and covered with vermin. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    CRUNDLE
    vb. (2) To crumple. "Don't 'ee crundle (crumple) up that newspaper, your grandfayther hasn't read it yet."
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 25
    CRUNDLE
    vb. (1) To crumble; to crush, to break up into small pieces; to disintegrate. With the dialect the' m' of crumble has been replaced with the letter 'n', "Now be a good boy and crundle that bread into your nice hot soup." "I'm just going to crundle up these here clods then I'll be in to supper."
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 24
    CRUNDLED
    vb. Crumbled. "They crundled up the stones with the steam-roller." "The old wall crundled down in pieces."
    TheDialectofKent(c1950)
    CRUNDLING
    Crumbling. "The old house is gradually crundling away". TheDialectofKent(c1950)
    CRUP krup adj. (2) Crisp. "You'll have a nice walk, as the snow is very crup." (see also Crips) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 39
    CRUP krup n. (1) The crisp, hard skin of a roasted pig, or of roast pork (crackling); a crisp spice-nut; a
    nest. "There's a wapses crup in that doated tree." (see also Crips) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 39
    CRUPPISH krup-ish adj. Peevish; out of sorts. A man who has been drinking overnight will sometimes say in the
    morning: "I feel cruppish." (see also Cript) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 39
    CRYEPE
    vb. Creep. Exactly corresponding to Old Frisian. Usual Old English forms = Creope (crepe). It is probable, from the forms bry-est, dy-epe, etc, that these words were dissyllabic
    The Dialect of Kent in the 14th Century. (1863)
    CUCKOO BREAD
    n. The wood sorrel. Oxalis acetosella. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    CUCKOO-CORN
    n. Corn sown too late in the spring.. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    CUCKOO-PINT
    n. The wild arum. (see also Kitty-come-down-the-lane-jump-up-and-kiss-me, Lady-keys (1), Lady-lords)
    n. (2) Any and every kind of rubbish, e.g., broken tiles, slates, and stones. done in the way of culture, by placing the oysters in favourable breeding beds, strewn with tiles, slates, old oyster shells, or other suitable culch for the spat to adhere to." - Life of Frank Buckland. (see also Pelt, Sculch, Scultch, Scutchel)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 39 Page 78 of 378
    Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977)
    CUCKOO'S BREAD AND C
    n. The seed of the mallow. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    CULCH kulch
    "Much may be
    CULCH kulch n. (1) Rags; bits of thread; shoddy. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    CULL kul n. (2) The culls of a flock are the worst; picked out to be parted with. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    CULL kul vb. (1) To pick; choose; select. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    CULVER KEYS kulv-urkeez n. The cowslip. Primula veris. (see also Cove-keys, Horsebuckle, Lady-keys (2), Paigle,
    Pegle) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 40
    CUMBERSOME kumb-ursum adj. Awkward; inconvenient. "I reckon you'll find that gurt coät mighty cumbersome."
    A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    CURRANTBERRIES kur-r'unt-ber-r'iz n.pl. Currants. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    CURS kurs adj. Cross; shrewish; surly. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    Page 40 n. A material like crape. 'In Sad cypress let me be laid' Shakespeare. (see also Cyprus)
    CYPRESS sei-prus A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    CYPRUS sei-prus n. A material like crape. (see also Cypress) A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
  • D
    D
    DABBERRIES dab-eriz n.pl. Gooseberries. (see also Goosegogs, Guozgogs) A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    DAFFY
    n. (2) A small quantity of spirits. "He's fond of his daffys." - J.H.Bridge. Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977) Page 40
    DAFFY daf-I n. (1) A large number or quantity, as " a rare daffy of people." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 40
    DAG dag n. (2) A lock of wool that hangs at the tail of a sheep and draggles in the dirt. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 40
    DAG dag vb. (1) To remove the dags or clots of wool, dirt, etc., from between the hind legs of a sheep.
    (see also Clat) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 40
    DAGG
    n. A large pistol. Boteler Inventory, 1600. - "Item in Jonathan Boteler's chamber: fower chestes with certain furniture for the warrs, viz., two corslettes, one Jack, two muskets furnished, one horseman's piec furnished, one case of daggs, two caliurs with swords and daggers, prized at . . . .£4. - Memorials of Eastry, p 22.
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    DAG-WOOL
    n. Refuse wool; cut off in trimming the sheep. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    DAMPIFIED
    adj. Denotes that the air is inclined to be, or feel, damp, a situation foretelling imminent rain. "We look like getting some rain mighty soon: the air is quite dampified."
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 27
    DAMPING
    vb. To drizzle with rain, though not actually raining. "No it aint raining yet, mum: it's only damping.". (see also Dampified)
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 27
    DANG dang inter A substitution for "damn." "Dang your young bóánes, doänt ye give me no more o'
    your sarce." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 41
    Page 80 of 378
    DAN'L
    n. The smallest animal in a litter of kittens, puppies or piglets. "Considering he wur a dan'l pup, he's sure growed up into a tidy sized darg (dog)." (see also Anthony-pig, Dannel, Runt)
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 27
    DANNEL
    n. The smallest animal in a litter of kittens, puppies or piglets. Really the correct use of dannel, as spoken in the Weald is for the smallest of a littler of piglets. "He may be the dannel of the pack (litter), but he sure is a real lively old young 'un, that there squeaker (piglet)". (see also Anthony-pig, Dan'l, Runt)
    TheDialectofKent(c1950)
    DAPPY
    adj. Half-witted. - Plumstead, West Kent. L.R.A.G. Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977)
    DARVEL
    n. Devil. A combination of Kentish Wealden and Kentish Gipsy dialects. "They young- uns be regular young darvels." (see also Dar'vl)
    n. Devil. A combination of Kentish Wealden and Kentish Gipsy dialects. "They young-
    TheDialectofKent(c1950)
    DAR'VL
    uns be regular young darvels." TheDialectofKent(c1950)
    DAWTHER
    (see also Darvel)
    dau-dhur
    vb. To tremble or shake; to move in an infirm manner. "He be getting' in years now, and caant do s'much as he did, but he manages jus' to dawther about the shop a little otherwhile." (see also Dodder)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    DA WTHER-GRASS dau-dhur n. A long shaking grass, elsewhere called Quaker, or quaking, grass.
    Dodder-grass) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    Briza media. (see also Page 41
    DAWTHERY dau-dhur'I adj. Shaky; tottery; trembling; feeble. Used commonly of old people - "He begins to get
    very dawthery. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 41
    Page 81 of 378
    DEAD
    vb. Dead. Dissyllabic pronounciation contained in the 'Ayenbite of Inwyt, 1340. 'This practice not only agrees with the present custom of the Frisians, but was, no doubt, that of the Anglo-Saxons.' (see also Dyad, Dyead)
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863)
    DEAD-ALIVE ded-ulei-v adj. Dull; stupid. "It's a dead-alive place." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    DEAF
    n. Deaf. Dissyllabic pronounciation contained in the 'Ayenbite of Inwyt, 1340. 'This practice not only agrees with the present custom of the Frisians, but was, no doubt, that of the Anglo-Saxons.' (see also Dyeaf)
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 18
    DEAL deel
    n. (1) A part; portion. Anglo-Saxon doel, from doelan, to divide; hence our expression, to deal cards, i.e. giving a fair portion to each; and dole, a gift divided or distributed. Leviticus Ch 14.v 10 - "And on the eighth day he shall take two he lambs withour blemish, and one ewe lamb of the first year without blemish, and two tenth deals of fine flour for a meat offering, mingled with oil, and one log of oil." (see also Doleing)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    DEAL dee-l n. (2) The nipple of a sow, bitch, fox or rat. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    DEATH deth adj. (1) Deaf. "It's a gurt denial to be so werry death." "De ooman was so plaguey death
    She cou'den make 'ar hear." - Dick and Sal, st 59 ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 41
    DEATH
    n. (2 )Death. Dissyllabic pronounciation contained in the 'Ayenbite of Inwyt, 1340. 'This practice not only agrees with the present custom of the Frisians, but was, no doubt, that of the Anglo-Saxons.' (see also Dyath)
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863)
    DEATHNESS deth-ness n. Deafness. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    DEAU
    n. Dew. Dissyllabic pronounciation contained in the 'Ayenbite of Inwyt, 1340. 'This practice not only agrees with the present custom of the Frisians, but was, no doubt, that of the Anglo-Saxons.' (see also Dyau)
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863)
    DEE
    n. Day. Use of 'e' for 'a'. Present dialect form i.e. 1863. TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863)
    DEEK dee-k n. A dyke or ditch. The " i " in Kent and Sussex is often pronounced as i in French. (see
    also Dick) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    DEEKERS dee-kurz n.pl. Men who dig ditches (deeks) and keep them in order. (see also Dykers) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    DEN
    n. A wooded valley, affording pasturage; also a measure of land; as in Somner, Antiquities of Canterbury, p. 27, ed. 1703, where we read: "The Manor of Lenham, consisting of 20 ploughlands and 13 denes." This word den is a very common one as a place-name, thus there are several Denne Courts in East Kent; and in the Weald especially, den is the termination of the name of many parishes, as well as of places in those parishes, thus we have Biddenden, Benenden, Bethersden, Halden, Marden, Smarden, Tenterden, Ibornden, etc. (see also Dene, Denne)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 42
    DENCHER-POUT dench-ur-pout n. A pout, or pile of weeds, stubble, or rubbish, made in the fields for burning, a cooch-fire,
    as it is elsewhere called. (see also Densher-pout) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 42
    DENE dee-n
    n. A wooded valley, affording pasturage; also a measure of land; as in Somner, Antiquities of Canterbury, p. 27, ed. 1703, where we read: "The Manor of Lenham, consisting of 20 ploughlands and 13 denes." This word den is a very common one as a place-name, thus there are several Denne Courts in East Kent; and in the Weald especially, den is the termination of the name of many parishes, as well as of places in those parishes, thus we have Biddenden, Benenden, Bethersden, Halden, Marden, Smarden, Tenterden, Ibornden, etc. (see also Den, Denne)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 42
    DENIAL dener-ul n. A detriment; drawback; hindrance; prejudice. "It's a denial to a farm to lie so far off the
    road." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 42
    DENNE den
    n. A wooded valley, affording pasturage; also a measure of land; as in Somner, Antiquities of Canterbury, p. 27, ed. 1703, where we read: "The Manor of Lenham, consisting of 20 ploughlands and 13 denes." This word den is a very common one as a place-name, thus there are several Denne Courts in East Kent; and in the Weald especially, den is the termination of the name of many parishes, as well as of places in those parishes, thus we have Biddenden, Benenden, Bethersden, Halden, Marden, Smarden, Tenterden, Ibornden, etc. (see also Den, Dene)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 42
    DENSHER-POUT den-shur-pout n. A pout, or pile of weeds, stubble, or rubbish, made in the fields for burning, a cooch-fire,
    as it is elsewhere called. (see also Dencher-pout) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 42
    DESTINY dest-ini n. Destination. "When we have rounded the shaw, we can keep the boat straight for her
    destiny." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    DEVIL-IN-THE-BUSH
    n. The flower otherwise called Love-in-the-mist. Nigella damascena. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    DEVILLED BLACKBERRI
    adj. Late, i.e. October, fruiting blackberries. Possibly a connection with the country saying "Pick blackberries in October. The Devil takes over." - Pat Winzar. 1982.
    Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977) Page 42
    DEVIL'S THREAD
    n. A weed that grows out in the fields. among the clover; it comes in the second cut, but does not come in the first. Otherwise called Hellweed. Cuscuta epithymum. (see also Hell- weed)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 42
    DEWLAPS
    n.pl. Coarse woollen stockings buttoned over others, to keep the legs warm and dry. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 42
    Page 84 of 378
    DIAKNEN
    n.pl. Deacons. Noun forming plural in 'en'. TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 20
    DIBBER dib-ur n. An agricultural implement for making holes in the ground, wherein to set plants or seeds.
    (see also Dibble) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 43
    DIBBLE dib-l n. An agricultural implement for making holes in the ground, wherein to set plants or seeds.
    (see also Dibber) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 43
    DICK dik n. A dyke or ditch. The " i " in Kent and Sussex is often pronounced as i in French. (see
    also Deek) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 43
    DICKER OF LEATHER
    n. Ten hides or skins - John Kersey. Dictionarium Anglo-Britannicum, 1708. The word is used in an inventory of an Egerton tanner, a Wealden family. Kent Archives Office
    Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977) Page 43
    DICKY dik-I n. Poorly; out of sorts; poor; miserable. "When I had the dicky feelin', I wishes I hadn't
    been so neglackful o' Sundays." A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888) Page 43
    DICKY-HEDGE-POKER dik-i-hej-poa-ker n. A hedge-sparrow. (see also Mollie) A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888) Page 43
    DIDAPPER
    n. The dab-chick. (see also Divedapper) A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888) Page 43
    DIDOS dei-doaz n.pl.Capers; pranks; tricks. "Dreckly ye be backturned, there he be, a-cutting all manner o'
    didos." A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888) Page 43
    Page 85 of 378
    DIEPE
    adj. Deep. Exactly corresponding to Old Frisian. Usual Old English forms = Deop (depe). It is probable, from the forms bry-est, dy-epe, etc, that these words were dissyllabic. (see also Dyepe)
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 17
    DIERE
    Dear. Exactly corresponding to Old Frisian. Usual Old English forms = Deore (duere, dure, dere). It is probable, from the forms bry-est, dy-epe, etc, that these words were dissyllabic (see also Dyere)
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863)
    DIN-A-LITTLE
    adv. Within a liitle; nearly. "I knows din-a-little where I be now." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    DIRTY-MONEY
    n. Monies paid for exceptionally dirty jobs or unhealthy work. - Chatham, Rochester, Strood and district, Royal Naval Dockyard workers. (see also Unker; unker-money)
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 95
    DISABIL dis-ubil n. Disorder; untidy dress. French Déshabillé. "Dear heart alive! I never expected for to
    see you,sir! I'm all in a disabil." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 43
    DISGUISED
    adj. Tipsy. "I'd rááther not say as he was exactly drunk, but he seemed as though he was jes' a little bit disguised."
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 43
    DISH-MEAT dish-meet n. Spoon meat, i.e. soft food, which requires no cutting up and can be eaten with a spoon. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 43
    DISHWASHER dish-wosh-r n. The water wagtail. Generally called "Peggy Dishwasher."(see also Peggy, Peggy
    Washdish) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 43
    Page 86 of 378
    DISSIGHT disei-t n. That which renders a person or place unsightly; a blemish; a defect. "Them there
    tumble-down cottages are a great dissight to the street." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    DIVEDAPPER
    n. The dab-chick. (see also Didapper) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    DO doo vb. To do for anyone is to keep house for him. "Now the old lady's dead, Miss Gamble she
    goos in and doos for him." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 43
    DOATED doa-tid adj. Rotten. Generally applied to wood. "That thurrock is all out-o'-titler; the helers are all
    doated." (see also Doited) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 44
    DOB dob vb. To put down. "So den I dobb'd him down de stuff, A plaguey sight to pay " - Dick and
    Sal, st 82 ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    DOBBIN dob-in n. Temper. "He lowered his dobbin, " i.e. he lost his temper. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    DODDER dod-ur
    vb. To tremble or shake; to move in an infirm manner. "He be getting' in years now, and caant do s'much as he did, but he manages jus' to dawther about the shop a little otherwhile." (see also Dawther)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    DODDER-GRASS dod-ur-grass n. A long shaking grass, elsewhere called Quaker, or quaking, grass.
    Dawther- grass) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    DODGER doj-ur n. A night-cap. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    Briza media. (see also Page 44
    DOELS doa-lz
    n.pl. The short handles which project from the bat of a scythe, and by which the mower holds it when mowing. The several parts of the scythe are: a) the scythe proper, or cutting part, of shear steel; b) the trai-ring and trai-wedge by which it is fastened to the bat; c) the bat or long staff, by which it is held when sharpening, and which is cut peeked, so that it cannot slip; and d) the doles, as above described.
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 45
    DOG dau-g, dog n. (1) An instrument for getting up hop-poles, called in Sussex a pole-putter. (see also Hop-
    dog (2) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 44
    DOG
    vb. (2) To follow another's footsteps. "She dogged him home." - J.H.Bridge. Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977) Page 44
    DOGS dogz n.pl. Two pieces of wood connected by a piece of string, and used by thatchers for carrying up
    the straw to its place on the roof, when arranged for thatching. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 44
    DOGS' DAISY
    n. The May weed, Anthemis cotula; so called, "'Cause it blows in the dog-days, ma'am." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 44
    DOG-WHIPPER dog-wip-ur n. The beadle of a church, whose duty it was, in former days, to whip the dogs out of
    church. The word frequently occurs in old Churchwardens' accounts. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 44
    DOINGS doo-ingz n.pl. Odd jobs. When a person keeps a small farm, and works with his team for hire,. he is
    said to do doings for people. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 44
    DOITED doi-tid adj. Decayed (used of wood). "That 'ere old eelm (elm) is regular doited, and fit for nothing
    only cord wood." (see also Doated) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 44
    DOLE doa-l n. (1) A set parcel, or distribution; an alms; a bale or bundle of nets. "60 awins make a
    dole of shot-nets, and 20 awins make a dole of herring nets " - Lewis, p.24 ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 44
    DOLE doa-l n. (2) A boundary stone; the stump of an old tree left standing. (see also Dole-stone, Dowal,
    Dowl) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    DOLEING doa-ling n. Almsgiving (see also Deal) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    DOLE-STONE doa-l-stoa-n n. A landmark. (see also Dole (2), Dolly, Dowal, Dowl) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    DOLING doa-ling n. A fishing boat with two masts, each carrying a sprit-sail. Boys, in his History of
    Sandwich, speaks of them as "ships for the King's use, furnished by the Cinque Ports." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 45
    DOLLOP
    n. (5) A portion "A dollop of lard." - Plumstead ,West Kent. L.R.A.G. Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977) Page 45
    DOLLOP dol-up n. (1) A parcel of tea sewn up in canvas for smuggling purposes; a piece, or portion, of
    anything, especially food. "Shall I give ye some?" "Thankee, not too big a dollop." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 45
    DOLLOP
    n. (2) A canvas bag for holding tea used by old Kentish smugglers up to some fifty years ago. "And down in that little dell, back o' old Colonel Cheeseman's house at Chart Court (i.e. part of Little Chart parish) the smugglers used to rest their ponies and have supper. Then off they'd go again, alongside o' Little Chart Church, and by the old secret smuggler's way to Ashford, with their dollops of tea, all a neatly packed on they ponies backs."
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 29
    DOLLOP
    n. (3) A long bramble. "I tore my pinnie on a great scratchy dollop, mum! There's a lot of them along the old hedge down the bottom of the garden. Perhaps uncle will swop (cut) 'em off with his brish-hook later on, aye?"
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 28
    DOLLOP
    n. (4) A lump of anything that is semi-fluid or soft in texture. "Jimmie! run you out with the pail and shovel and scrape up that great dollop of hoss manure out of the rord (road)" "Now eat up that dollop of porridge! It's got real treacle on it, and it will help warm ye up no end." "Dang ye! Look at they dollops of mud ye've brought in an yer boots all over my nice clean floor."
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 28
    DOLLY
    n. A tree marker to delineate boundary in coppice wood. - Peter Lambert. (see also Dole- stone, Dole (2), Dowal, Dowl)
    Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977) Page 45
    DOLLYMOSH dol-imosh vb. To demolish; destroy; entirely spoil. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 45
    DOLOURS dol-urz vb. A word expressive of the moaning of the wind, when blowing up for rain. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 45
    DOLPHIN dol-fin
    n. A kind of fly (aphis) which comes as a blight upon roses, honeysuckles, cinerarias, etc.; also upon beans. It is sometimes black, as on beans and honeysuckles; and sometimes green, as on roses and cinerarias.
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 45
    DONNY
    n. A hand; donnies is the plural. These words are only used in connection with very young children and babies. "Shake your donny to dear grandma, then, baby." "She likes you auntie: look at her shaking her donnies to you, the dear little thing."
    TheDialectofKent(c1950)
    DOODLE-SACK doo-dl-sak n. A bagpipe. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    DORICK doa-rik vb. A frolic; lark; spree; a trick. "Now then, none o' your doricks." A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    DOSS dos vb. To sit down rudely. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    DOSSET dos-it n. A very small quantity of any liquid. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    DOUGH doa n. A thick clay soil. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    DOVER-HOUSE doa-vur-hous n. A necessary house. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    DOW AL dou-ul
    n. A boundary post. 1630 - "Layd out for seauen dowlstones. .18p. these dowl stones from place to place, 2s. - MS Accounts, St Johns' Hospital, Canterbury. (see also Dole, Dole stone, Dolly, Dowl)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    DOWELS dou-lz n.pl. Low marshes. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    DOWL dou-l
    For . . . to carrye ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 46
    DOWN doun
    n. A piece of high open ground, not peculiar to Kent, but perhaps more used here than elsewhere. Thus we have Up-down in Eastry; Harts-down and North-down in Thanet; Leys- down in Sheppey; Barham Downs, etc. The open sea off Deal is termed the Downs.
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 46 Page 91 of 378
    n. A boundary post. 1630 - "Layd out for seauen dowlstones. .18p. these dowl stones from place to place, 2s. - MS Accounts, St Johns' Hospital, Canterbury. (see also Dole, Dole stone, Dolly, Dowal)
    For . . . to carrye Page 46
    DOWNW ARD dou-nwur'd adv. The wind is said to be downwards when it is in the south. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    DOZTREN
    n.pl. Daughters. Noun forming plural in 'en'. TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863)
    DRAB drab vb. To drub; to flog; to beat ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    DRABBLES
    n. Drabs. "He calleth or wyffs ill facid hores and drabbles." - Act Book Rochester 9f 195b in Hammond, The Story of an Outpost Parish, p 169.
    Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977)
    DRAGGLETAIL drag-ltail n. (1) A slut, or dirty, untidy, and slovenly woman. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    DRAGGLE-TAIL
    n. (2) A slut; a dirty woman; a slatternly housewife. "Considering she ain't got no young- uns, she be a rare draggle-taile." "If you don't wash yourself young Liza, you'll grow up into nothing more than a lazy draggle-tail." A slatternly female is sometimes referred to as a "draggle-tailed sheep", on account of the filthy condition of such a poor animal's tail and hind- quarters and organs of excretion and urination. To call a woman in Kent a "draggle-tailed sheep" is to factually insult her in the highest and bitterest mode possible amidst a rural community.
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 30
    DRAGGLE-TAIL
    n. (4) A long-tailed sheep. "If old 'Squeaker' Pile don't soon catch and cut that draggle-tailed ship's (sheep's) tail, it will be fuller of maggots than old Ma Henniker's cheese is o' mites or a stargog (starling) full o' fleas."
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 30
    DRAGGLE-TAIL
    n. (3) A long-tailed (old fashioned) skirt. "Look at that draggle-tail she's a-wearing! Must have belonged to her great-grandmither I should say."
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 30
    DRAGON'S TONGUE drag-unz tung n. Iris foetidissima. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 46
    DRAUGHT dr'aa-ft n. The bar, billet, or spread-bat, to which the traces of all horses are fixed when four are
    being used at plough. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 46
    DRA WHOOK drau-uok
    n. An implement for cleaning out dykes, and freeing them of weeds, consisting of a three- tined fork, bent round so as to form a hook, and fitted to a long handle. - East Kent. 1627 - "For mending on of the drawe hoockes." - MS. Accounts, St John's Hospital, Canterbury.
    A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    DRAW-WELL drau-wel n. A hole or well sunk for the purpose of obtaining chalk. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    DRAY drai n. (1) A squirrel's nest. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    DRAY drai n. (2) A word usually applied to places where there is a narrow passage through the slime
    and mud. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    DREAN dree-un vb. (2) To drip. "He was just dreäning wet when he came in." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    DREAN dree-un n. (1) A drain. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    DRECKLY-MINUTE drek-li-min-it adv. Immediately; at once; without delay; contracted from "directly this minute." (see also
    Minute (2) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 47
    Page 93 of 378
    DREDGE drej n. A bush-harrow. To drag a bundle of bushes over a field like a harrow. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    DRILL dril vb. To waste away by degrees. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    Page 47
    Page 47 vb. To drive. "I want ye driv some cattle!" "Very sorry, but I'm that druv up I caan't do't!"
    DRIV driv A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    DRIZZLE driz-l vb. To bowl a ball close to the ground. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    DROASINGS droa-zingz n.pl. Dregs of tallow. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    DROITS droit-s n.pl. Rights; dues; customary payments. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    DROKE droa-k n. A filmy weed very common in standing water. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    DROPHANDKERCHIEF drop-angk-urchif n. The game elsewhere called "kiss-in-the-ring". A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    DROP-ROD
    corn to the stack, when there ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 47
    vb. "To do drop rod" is an expression used of carrying hay or are two wagons and only one team of horses; the load is then left at the stack, and the horses taken out of the rods or shafts, and sent to bring the other wagon from the field.
    DROSE droa-z vb. To gutter. Spoken of a candle flaring away, and causing the wax to run down the sides.
    "The candlestick is all drosed," i.e., covered with grease. (see also Drosley) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 47
    DROSLEY
    vb. To gutter. Spoken of a candle flaring away, and causing the wax to run down the sides. "The candlestick is all drosed," i.e., covered with grease. (see also Drose)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 47
    DROVE-WAY droa-v wai n. A road for driving cattle to and from the marshes, etc, wherein they pasture. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 48
    DRUMMER
    n. A fully grown rabbit. The name being derived from the noise, or 'drumming' of the strong hind legs, upon the ground, when a large rabbit is surprised and scared, and runs hard to its burrow, giving earth-tremor warnings to any other rabbits in the immediate vicinity. (see also Jonnie)
    TheDialectofKent(c1950)
    DRUV druv vb. Driven. "We wunt de druv." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    DRYTH drei-th n. Drought; thirst. "I call cold tea very purty stuff to squench your dryth." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    DUFF duf n. A dark coloured clay. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    DULL dul vb. To make blunt. "As for fish-skins - 'tis a terr'ble thing to dull your knife." - Folkestone. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 48
    DULLING UP
    adv. It becomes dull now and then; cloudy. "It keeps dulling up." - Landlord of 'Chiltern Hundreds', Boxley. J.W.Bridges 1932.
    Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977) Page 48
    Page 95 of 378
    DUMBLEDORE dumb-ldoar n. A bumble bee; an imitative words allied to boom, to hum. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 48
    DUN-CROW dun-kroa n. The hooded or Royston crow, which is found in great numbers in North Kent during the
    winter. Corvus cornix. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 48
    DUNES deu-nz
    n.pl. Sand hills and hillocks, near the margins of the sea. At Sandwich, thieves were anciently buried alive in these dunes, or sand-hills. Boys' in his ' History of Sandwich', pp. 464-465, gives us the "Customal of Sandwich" from which it appears that ". . .in an appeal of theft or robbery if the person be found with the goods upon him, it behoves him to shew, on a day appointed, how he came by them , and, upon failure, he shall not be able to aquit himself. . .If the person, however, upon whom the goods are, avows that they are his own, and that he is not guilty of the appeal, he may acquit himself by 36 good men and true . . . and save himself and the goods. When the names of the 36 compurgators are delivered to the Bailiff in writing they are to be distinctly called over. . . and, if any one of them shall be absent, or will not answer, the appellee must suffer death. But if they all separately answer to their names, the Bailiff, on the part of the King, then puts aside 12 of the number, and the Mayor and Jurats 12 more, thereby agreeing together in fixing of the 12 of the 36 to swear with the Appellee that he is not guilty of the matters laid to his charge . . . The Accused is first sworn that he is not guilty, kissing the book, and then the others come up as they are called, and separately swear that the oath which the Appellee has taken is good and true, . . and that he is not guilty of what is alleged against him, kissing the book, . . by which the Appellee is acquitted and the Appellant becomes liable to an attachment, and his goods are at the disposal of the King. If, however, one of the 12 withdraws his hand from the book and will not swear, the Appellee must be executed; and all who are condemned in such cases are to be buried alive, in a place set apart for the purpose, at Sandown (near Deal) called 'The Thief Downs', which ground is the property of the Corporation." (see Guestling (1)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 48
    DUNG DOLLEY
    n. A cart for carrying manure through hop alleys in the summer time. - R Cooke. (see also Hop Dolley)
    Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977) Page 49
    DUNK
    vb. To throw down, up, or upon. "Dunk that old rubbish up here into the old car!" "Don't dunk that dirty old shirt down on my nice clean washing you idjit." "Dunk that truss o' hay down there by the barn-door, Willum!" "Real ockard (awkward) be young Garge. I sez to 'im, dunk it down 'ere - where the ground be dry - but no! 'e gooed (went) an' dunked it down in all that slub (semi-liquid manure) - by the old sow's stoi (stye)."
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 30
    DUNNAMANY dun-umeni adj.phr. (1) I don't know how many. "'Tis no use what ye say to him, I've told him an't a
    dunnamany times." (see also Dunnamenny) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 49
    DUNNAMENNY
    adj.phr. (2) Don't know how many. "There's a tidy lot of chickens up at the poultry farm, but dunnamenny." (see also Dunnamany)
    TheDialectofKent(c1950)
    DUNNAMUCH dun-umuch adj.phr. I don't know how much. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    DUNTY dunt-I adj. Stupid; confused. It also sometimes means stunted; dwarfish. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    DURGAN-WHEAT durg-un-weet n. Bearded wheat. (see also Cone-wheat) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    DWARFS-MONEY
    n. Ancient coins. So called in some places on the coast. (see also Bald-pates, Borrow- pence, Hegs pence)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 49
    DWINDLE
    n. A poor sickly child. "Ah! he's a terr'ble poor little dwindle, I doän’t think he wun't never come to much."
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 49
    DYAD
    vb. Dead. Dissyllabic pronounciation contained in the 'Ayenbite of Inwyt, 1340. 'This practice not only agrees with the present custom of the Frisians, but was, no doubt, that of the Anglo-Saxons.' (see als Dead, Dyead)
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 18
    DYATH
    n. Death. Dissyllabic pronounciation contained in the 'Ayenbite of Inwyt, 1340. 'This practice not only agrees with the present custom of the Frisians, but was, no doubt, that of the Anglo-Saxons.' (see also Death)
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 18
    DYAU
    n. Dew. Dissyllabic pronounciation contained in the 'Ayenbite of Inwyt, 1340. 'This practice not only agrees with the present custom of the Frisians, but was, no doubt, that of the Anglo-Saxons.' (see also Deau)
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 18
    DYEAD
    vb. Dead. Dissyllabic pronounciation contained in the 'Ayenbite of Inwyt, 1340. 'This practice not only agrees with the present custom of the Frisians, but was, no doubt, that of the Anglo-Saxons.'
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 18
    DYEAF
    n. Deaf. Dissyllabic pronounciation contained in the 'Ayenbite of Inwyt, 1340. 'This practice not only agrees with the present custom of the Frisians, but was, no doubt, that of the Anglo-Saxons.' (see also Deaf)
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 18
    DYEPE
    adj. Deep. Exactly corresponding to Old Frisian. Usual Old English forms = Deop (depe) It is probable, from the forms bry-est, dy-epe, etc, that these words were dissyllabic (see also Diepe)
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 17
    DYERE
    Dear. Exactly corresponding to Old Frisian. Usual Old English forms = Deore (duere, dure, dere). It is probable, from the forms bry-est, dy-epe, etc, that these words were dissyllabic. (see also Diere)
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863)
    DYEVELEN
    n.pl. Devils. Noun forming plural in 'en'. TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863)
    DYKERS dei-kurz n.pl. Men who make and clean out dykes and ditches. 1536 - "Paid to a man for helping the
    dykers." - MS. Accounts, St. John's Hospital, Canterbury. (see also Deekers) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    DYSTER dei-str n. The pole of an ox-plough. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
  • E-F
    E
    EAR ee-r
    vb. To plough. "Eryng of land three times." - Old Parish Book of Wye, 28 Henry 8. "Caesar, I bring thee word: Menocrates and Menas, famous pirates, Make the sea serve them, which they ear and wound With Keels of every kind . . . " - Anthony and Cleopatra, Act 1 Sc 4
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    EAREN
    n.pl. Ears. Noun forming plural in 'en'. TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863)
    EARING eer-r'ing n. Ploughing, i.e., the time of ploughing. . . . "And yet there shall be five years in the
    which there shall be neither earing nor harvest." - Genesis Ch 45 v 6 A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    EARTH urth vb. To cover up with earth. "I've earthed up my potatoes" A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    EAXE ee-uks n. An ax, or axle. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    ECHE ee-ch
    n. (1) An eke, or addition; as, an additional piece to a bell rope, to eke it out and make it longer. So we have Eche-End near Ash-next-Sandwich. 1525 - "For 2 ropes for eches for the bell ropys, 2d." Accounts, St. Dunstan's, Canterbury..
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    ECHE ee-ch vb. (2) To eke out; to augment. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    ECKER ek-ur vb. To stammer; stutter. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 50
    EDDER
    n. Adder. Use of 'e' for 'a'. Old Frisian bend=band; stef=staff; sterk=stark; weter= water. The 'Ayenbite of Inwyt', 1340, contains this word.
    The Dialect of Kent in the 14th Century. (1863)
    EDDEREN
    n.pl. Adders. Noun forming plural in 'en'. The Dialect of Kent in the 14th Century. (1863)
    EELM ee-lm n. Elm (see also Elvin) A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    EEL-SHEER ee-lsheer n. A three-pronged spear for catching eels. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    E'EN A'MOST ee-numoa-st adv. Almost. Generally used with some emphasis. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    EEND ee-nd n. A term in ploughing; the end of a plough-furrow. Two furrows make one eend. Always
    so pronounced. "I ain't only got two or three eends to-day, to finish the field." (see also End)
    A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    EFFET ef-it n. An eft; a newt. Anglo-Saxon, efete. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    EIREN
    n.pl. Eggs. Old English ei, an egg. The Dialect of Kent in the 14th Century. (1863)
    ELDERN eld-urn n. The elder tree, and its wood. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 51
    ELE
    n. Awl. Use of 'e' for 'a'. Old Frisian bend=band; stef=staff; sterk=stark; weter= water. The 'Ayenbite of Inwyt', 1340, contains this word. Old English - Ale and Owel.
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 14
    ELEVENSES elev-nziz n. A drink or snack of refreshment at eleven o'clock in the forenoon. Called in Essex,
    Beevors; and in Sussex, Elevener. (see also Bever, Leavener, Progger, Scran) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 51
    ELLINGE el-inj adj. Solitary; lonely; far from neighbours; ghostly. 1470 - "Nowe the crowe calleth reyne
    with a eleynge voice." - Bartholomaeus de proprietatibus rerum. (see also Uncous, Unky)
    A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    ELMESSEN
    n.pl. Alms. Noun forming plural in 'en'. The Dialect of Kent in the 14th Century. (1863)
    ELVIN el-vin n. An elm. Still used, though rarely. (see also Eelm) A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    EMMET em-ut n. An ant. (see also Horse emmet) A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    EMMET CASTS em-ut kaa-stiz n. Ant hills. (see also Ammut-cast) A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    END end n. A term in ploughing; the end of a plough-furrow. Two furrows make one eend. Always
    so pronounced. "I ain't only got two or three eends to-day, to finish the field." (see also Eend) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 51
    ENOW enou- n. Enough. "Have ye got enow?" ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    ENTETIG ent-itig vb. To introduce. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    EPPEL
    n. Apple Use of 'e' for 'a'. Old Frisian bend=band; stef=staff; sterk=stark; weter= water. The' Ayenbite of Inwyt', 1340, contains this word.
    The Dialect of Kent in the 14th Century. (1863)
    EPS eps n. The asp tree. (see also Aps (1) A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    ERNFUL urn-ful adj. (1) Lamentable. "Ernful bad", lamentably bad. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    ERNFUL urn-ful adv. (2) Sorrowful. "ernful tune," sorrowful tunes. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    ERSH ur-sh n. The stubble after the corn has been cut. (see also Grattan, Gratten, Gratton (1) & (2),
    Podder-gratten, Rowens) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    ESS es n.pl. A large worm. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    ESSHE
    n. Ash. Use of 'e' for 'a'. Old Frisian bend=band; stef=staff; sterk=stark; weter= water. The' Ayenbite of Inwyt', 1340, contains this word.
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 14
    EVEN (to make)
    vb. "Also now of late on of our neybors namyd John Andrew lying uppon his bed sore sike a biding the mercy of God sent on of his sonnes to the vicar to com to hym yt he might make hym selfe even with god and the worlde." - Act Book of Rochester 9 fol 195b in Hammond 'The Story of an Outpost Parish' p 167. (see also Make even)
    Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977)
    EVERYTHING SOMETHI ev-rithing sup-m n. Something of everything; all sorts of things. "She called me everything
    something,"i.e.she called me every name she could think of. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    EYESORE ei-soar n. A disfigurement; a dissight; something which offends the eye, and spoils the appearance
    of a thing; a detriment. "A sickly wife is a great eyesore to a man." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 51
    EYLEBOURNE ai-lboarn
    n. An intermittent spring. "There is a famous eylebourn which rises in the parish (Petham) and sometimes runs but a little way before it falls into the ground." - Harris's History of Kent, p 240. (see Nailbourn)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    EZEN
    n.pl.Eyes. Noun forming plural in 'en'. TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863)
    FACK fak n. The first stomach of a ruminating animal, from which the herbage is resumed into the
    mouth. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 52
    FADER faa-dur
    n. Father. Extract from the will of Sir John Spyoer, Vicar of Monkton, A.D.1450 . . . . "The same 10 marc shall be for a priest's salary; one whole yere to pray for my soule, my fadyr soule, my modyr soul, and all crystyn soules." - Lewis, p.12. The pronounciation still prevails.
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 52
    FAGGS fagz
    interj. adv. A cant word of affirmation; in good faith; indeed; truly. Shakespeare has: "I' fecks" = in faith, in A Winter's Tale, Act 1 Sc 2, where we see the word in process of abbreviation. (see also Fags)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 52 Page 103 of 378
    FAGS fagz
    interj. adv. A cant word of affirmation; in good faith; indeed; truly. Shakespeare has: "I' fecks" = in faith, in A Winter's Tale, Act 1 Sc 2, where we see the word in process of abbreviation. (see also Faggs)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 52
    FAIRISIES fai-r'iseez n.pl. Fairies. This reduplicated plural of fairy - fairyses - gives rise to endless mistakes
    between the fairies of the story-books and the Pharisees of the Bible. (see also Pharisees) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 52
    FAIRY-SPARKS fai-r'i-sparks n.pl. Phosphoric light, sometimes seen on clothes at night, and in former times attributed to the
    fairies. Otherwise called "shell-fire". A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888) Page 52
    FAKEMENT fai-kmu'nt n. Pain; uneasiness; distress. "Walking does give me fakement to-day." - Sittingbourne.
    A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    FALL faul n. (2) A portion of growing underwood, ready to fell or cut. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    FALL faul vb. (1) To fell; to cut down. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    FANTEEG fanteeg- n. A state of worry; excitement; passion. "We couldn't help laughing at the old lady, she
    put herself in such a fanteeg." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    FANTOD fan-tud adj. Fidgetty; restless; uneasy. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    FARDLE faa-dl n. A bundle; a little pack. Amongst the rates or dues of Margate Pier and Harbour, Lewis
    gives - "For every fardle. . . 1d." Italian, Fardello. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 53
    FARGO
    n. A bad smell. "Them privies want emptying, surelye! Pooh! What a fargo!" "They old pig-sties sure be chucking out a rare fargo!" (see also Fogo, Hoogoo, Hum (2), Hussle, Ponk, Wiff)
    TheDialectofKent(c1950)
    FAT fat n. A large open tub; a vat; a ton or tun. "And the floors shall be full of wheat, and the fats
    shall overflow with wine and oil." - Joel Ch 2 v 24. (see also Ton, Tun) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    FATTEN fat-un n. A weed. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    FAVOUR fai-vur
    vb. To resemble; have a likeness to another person. "You favour your father," i.e., you have a strong likeness to your father. "Joseph was a goodly person and well-favoured." - Genesis Ch 39 v 6 (see also Bly)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 53
    FAYER
    adj. (2) Honest. "I'll say he's a fayer and honest a eggler, you'll meet in many aday." TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 33
    FAYER
    adj. (1) Fair. "Her hayer (hair) be as fayer as the ripe corn." TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 33
    FAZEN fai-zn adj. The fazen eel is a large brown eel, and is so called at Sandwich in contradistinction to the
    silver eel. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 53
    FEAR fee vb. To frighten. "To see his face the lion walk'd along Behind some hedge, because he
    would not fear him." - Shakespeare - Venus and Adonis. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    FEASE feez n. (2) A feasy, fretting, whining child. Formed from the adj. feasy. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    FEASE feez vb. (1) To fret; worry. (see also Frape (1) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 53
    FEASY fee-zi adj. Whining; peevish; troublesome. "He's a feasy child." (see also Tattery) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 53
    FEETENS fit-nz n.pl. Foot-marks; foot-prints; hoof-marks. "The rain do lodge so in the horses' feetens." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 54
    FELD feld n. A field - Sittingbourne. In other parts of Kent it is usually "fill". "Which way to
    Sittingbourne?" "Cater across that ere feld of wuts (oats)." (see also Fild, Fill) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    FELLET fel-it n. A portion of a wood divided up for felling; a portion of felled woods. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    FELLOWLY fel-oali adj. Familiar; free. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    FELTHE
    n. Filth. Old Kentish 'e' replaces Northern ' i' and Southern 'u'. Filth (see also Velthe)
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863)
    FENAGE
    vb. (1) To cancel. "You can fenage that agreement maister, I'll have no more to do with ye!" TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 35
    FENAGE
    vb. (2) To finish. "We can fenage this field tonight if the moon holds good." TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 35
    Page 106 of 378
    Felthe (K) = Fulthe (S) = Page 16
    FENAGE
    vb. (3) To stop. "Hey, you boys! Give over running - fenage, will ye? If ye don't, I'll have the constable on ye."
    TheDialectofKent(c1950)
    FENAGE
    n. (4) The end. "Well that's the fenage of it, thank the Lord!" TheDialectofKent(c1950)
    FENNY fen-I adj. Dirty; mouldy as cheese. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    FERE
    n. Fire. Old Kentish 'e' replaces Northern ' i' and Southern 'u'. Fere (K) = Fur (S) = Fire (N) (see also Vere)
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 16
    FESS
    vb. (1) Confess. "They made him fess he stole the apples." Fessed - "The old poacher fessed he were in the wood last night."
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 33
    FESS
    n. (2) Mentally disturbed. "Stop banging on that old pail, you get me on quite a fess." TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 34
    FESSED
    vb. Puzzled. "I've tried to add these sums but they've got me fessed, sir." TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 33
    FESSED UP
    vb. Mental puzzlement of a useless, vacillating character. "All this rushing and tearing around get me all fessed up."
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 34
    FESSER
    n. (1) Knowledge, a personal type of scholarship. Also a shortened form of Professor, used, though very rarely as a nickname. Mr Horton was given this nickname, he was the only 'fesser' in the parishes of Pluckley, Egerton and Little Chart. "That's old 'Fesser' Horton, he do know a rare mighty lot about the birds and beasties, like his old fayther did, who was gamekeeper to old Sir Edward Dering and afterwards to his son Sir Henry."
    TheDialectofKent(c1950)
    FESSER
    n. (2) Confessor. "He stood as fesser for them all." TheDialectofKent(c1950)
    FET fet vb. To fetch. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    FEW feu adj. This word is used as a substantive in such phrases as "a good few," "a goodish few,"
    which mean "pretty many," or "a nice little lot." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 54
    FICKLE fik-l vb. To fickle a person in the head with this or that, is to put it into his head; in a rather bad
    sense. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 54
    FID fid n. A portion of straw pulled out and arranged for thatching. Four or five fids are about as
    much as a thatcher will carry up in his dogs. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    FIDDLE FART-ARSE
    n. A fidgetty character of pernickety habits. - West Kent. L.R.A.G 1920's. Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977)
    FIDDLER fid-lur
    n. The angel, or shark-ray. "We calls these fiddlers because they're like a fiddle." The following couplet is current in West Kent: "Never a fisherman need there be, If fishes could hear as well as see."
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 54
    Page 108 of 378
    FIDGET-ARSE
    n. See under "Fiddle arse about" in Eric Partridge, A Dictionary of Slang. - West Kent. L.R.A.G.1920's. (see also Fidgetty bum.)
    Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977) Page 54
    FIDGETTY BUM
    n. See under "Fiddle arse about" in Eric Partridge, A Dictionary of Slang. - West Kent. L.R.A.G.1920's. (see also Fidget-arse)
    Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977) Page 54
    FIELD-ROOM
    n. Corn cut green is said to want much field-room or to require standing a long time before it is fit to carry. - R Cooke.
    Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977)
    FILD fild n. A field (see also Feld, Fill) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    FILL fil n. A field. (see also Feld, Fild) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    FILL-NOR-FALL fil-nor-faul An expression frequently used as to any person or anything lost.
    Monday, and I can't hear neither fill-nor-fall of him." A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    FINGER-COLD fin-gur koal-d adj. Cold to the fingers; "We shall very soon have the winter 'pon us, 'twas downright finger-
    cold first thing this morning." (see also Hand-cold) A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888) Page 55
    FINKLE fin-kl n. Wild fennel. Faniculum vulgare. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888) Page 55
    FIRE-BLAST
    n. When in dry weather hop-leaves turn yellow, this is called 'fire-blast', also 'putting on the yellow stockings'. - R Cooke. (see also Yellow stockings, putting on)
    Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977) Page 55
    "My old dog went off last Page 54
    FIREDOGS
    n.pl. And-irons; irons standing on the hearth, and intended to keep the brands and burning coals in their place; also the irons by which the spit is supported. "One payer of standing cob- yrons." . . . . "One payer of cob-irons or brand-irons.". . . . "Item in the Greate Hall. . . . a payer of cob-irons." - Boteler Inventories in the Memorials of Eastry. (see also Andirons, Brand-irons, Cob-irons)
    Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977) Page 55
    FIRE-FORK
    n. A shovel for the fire, made in the form of a three-pronged fork, as broad as a shovel, and fitted with a handle made of bamboo or other wood. "Item in the kitchen. . . . one payer of tongs, one fire-forke of iron, etc." - Boteler Inventory, Memorials of Eastry, p. 227.
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 55
    FIRK
    vb. (3) To play the fool; to fool about. "Now stop firking around when I'm getting yer fayther's tea ready."
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 36
    FIRK
    vb. (4) To poke about. "It was wet yesterday, so I was able to firk around in the toolshed and put things ship-shape."
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 36
    FIRK
    vb. (2) To scratch. "They brambles do firk yer arms when gathering blackberries." TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 36
    FIRK
    vb. (1) To look after No.1 "I'm not a greedy bloke, but I do like to firk for myself."
    TheDialectofKent(c1950)
    FLABERGASTED flab-urgastid adj. or pp. Astonished and rather frightened. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    FLAM
    vb. (1) To deceive or cheat. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    FLAM
    n. (2) A falsehood. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 55
    FLA W flau vb. To flay; to strip the bark off timber. "I told him to goo down into de wood flawin', and
    he looked as tho' he was downright flabbergasted." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    FLAZZ
    adj. Newly fledged. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    FLECK flek n. Hares; rabbits; ground-game. "They killed over two hundred pheasants, but not but
    terr'ble little fleck." (see also Flick) A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    FLEED fleed n. The inside fat of a pig, from which lard is made. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    FLEED-CAKES flee-kaiks n.pl .Cakes made with the fresh fleed of a pig. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    FLEEKY flee-ki adj. Flaky; in flakes. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    FLEET fleet
    n. (1) A creek; a bay or inlet; a channel for the passage of boats and vessels, hence the name of North-fleet. Anglo-Saxon, fleot. "A certain Abbot. . . made there a certain flete in his own proper soil, through which little boats used to come to the aforesaid town (of Mynster). - Lewis p. 78 The word is still used about Sittingbourne, and is applied to sheets of salt and brackish water in the marshes adjoining the Medway and the Swale. Most of them have no communication with the tidal water, except through water-gates, but they generally represent the channels of streams which have been partly diverted by draining operations. (see also Flete)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 55
    FLEET fleet n. (4) Every Folkestone herring-boat carries a fleet of nets, and sixty nets make a fleet. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 56
    FLEET fleet vb. (3) To skim any liquor, especially milk. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 56
    FLEET fleet vb. (2) To float. The word is much used by North Kent bargemen, and occasionally by
    "inlanders." "The barge fleeted about four o'clock to-day." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 56
    FLEET MILK
    n. (2) Milk that has been de-creamed and fully separated of all its fats content. Another name is skim-milk. (see also Flit-milk)
    The Dialect of Kent (c1950)
    FLEET MILK
    n. (1) Skimmed milk. ( see also Flit milk). A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    FLEETING-DISH
    n. A shallow dish for cream. ( see Fleet (3) A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    FLEG
    n. Flag. Use of 'e' for 'a'. Present dialect form i.e. 1863. The Dialect of Kent in the 14th Century. (1863)
    FLETE fleet
    n. A creek; a bay or inlet; a channel for the passage of boats and vessels, hence the name of North-fleet. Anglo-Saxon, fleot. "A certain Abbot. . . made there a certain flete in his own proper soil, through which little boats used to come to the aforesaid town (of Mynster). - Lewis p. 78 The word is still used about Sittingbourne, and is applied to sheets of salt and brackish water in the marshes adjoining the Medway and the Swale. Most of them have no communication with the tidal water, except through water-gates, but they generally represent the channels of streams which have been partly diverted by draining operations. (see also Fleet 1)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 55
    FLICK flik n. (1) The hair of a cat, or the fur of a rabbit. (see Fleck) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 56
    FLICK
    n. (2) Cow hair, used with clay in timber-framed houses. - Ron Baldwin. 1976.
    Notes on 'A Dictionary of Kentish Dialect & Provincialisms' (c1977)
    FLICKING-TOOTH-COMB flik-in-tooth-koam n. A comb for a horse's mane. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    FLIG
    n. The strands of grass. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    FLINDER flin-dur n. A butterfly. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    FLINDER-MOUSE flind-ur-mous n. A bat. (see also Flinter-mouse, Flitter-mouse) A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    FLINTER-MOUSE flint-ur-mous n. A bat. This form is intermediate between flinder-mouse and flitter mouse. The plural
    form is flinter-mees ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 56
    FLIT-MILK flit-milk n. (1) Skim milk; the milk after the cream has been taken off it. (see also Fleet milk) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 56
    FLIT-MILK
    n. (2) Milk that has been de-creamed and fully separated of all its fats content. Another name is skim-milk. (see also Fleet-milk)
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 36
    FLITTER-MOUSE flit-ur-mous n. A bat. (see also Flinder-mouse, Flinter-mouse) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 56
    FLOAT float n. A wooden frame, sloping outward, attached to the sides, head, or back, of a cart, enabling
    it to carry a larger load than would otherwise be possible. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    FLOWER flou-r n. The floor (always pronounced thus). ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    FLUE floo adj. Delicate; weak; sickly. In East Kent it is more commonly applied to persons than to
    animals. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    FLUFF fluff n. Anger; choler. "Dat raised my fluff." - Dick and Sal, st 74 ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    FLUMP
    n. A fall causing a loud noise. "She came down with a flump on the floor." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    FLY-GOLDING
    n. A lady-bird.also called a lady-cow. - R Cooke. (see also Bug (2), Lady-bug, Lady-cow, Golding, Mary-gold, Merrigo)
    Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977)
    FOAL'S FOOT
    n. Colt's foot. Fussilago farfara. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    FOBBLE
    vb. To play about where there is a possibility of danger. "Don't 'ee fobble about on top o' that old chalk-hole (chalk quarry) or maybe ye'll get yerself kilt (killed) or injured."
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 37
    FOBBLER
    n. A person who plays the fool; a 'silly ass'. "Look at that fobbler trying to stand on that post atop o' that barbed-wire fence." "He do talk such silly rot. He be a regular fobbler, I do say!" "Ye don't have to call me a fobbler just a-cause I was throwing stones at that old bottle on the style."
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 37
    FOBBLING
    vb. Playing about; to play around or about. "I wish they noisey young-uns would stop fobbling about right outside the door on a Sunday artnoon, when a body wants to have half-an- hour wi her Bible, and to have a nice nap 'fore tea-time."
    TheDialectofKent(c1950)
    FODDER
    n. Fodder. R. Cooke (see also Fother) Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977)
    FODGEE
    n. A farthing. - Maidstone. Fred Amies. L.R.A.G. 1977. Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977)
    FOG fog n. The second crop of grass. From Low Latin, fogagium, or foragium. (See also Aftermath,
    Aftermeath) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    FOGO foa-goa n. A stench. (see also Fargo, Hoogoo, Hum (2), Hussle, Ponk, Wiff) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    FOLD-PITCHER foald-pich-r n. An iron implement, other-wise called a peeler, for making holes in the ground, wherein to
    put wattles or hop-poles. (see also Peeler) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 57
    FOLKESTONE GIRLS foa-ksun galz
    n.pl. Folkestone girls; the name given to heavy rain clouds. - Chilham. "De Folkston gals looked houghed black; Old Walter'd roar'd about; Says I to Sal 'shall we go back?' 'No, no!' says she, 'kip out.' " - Dick and Sal, st 23 (See also Folkestone Lasses, Folkestone Washerwomen)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 57
    Page 115 of 378
    FOLKESTONE LASSES foa-ksun las-sez
    n.pl. Folkestone girls; the name given to heavy rain clouds. - Chilham. "De Folkston gals looked houghed black; Old Walter'd roar'd about; Says I to Sal 'shall we go back?' 'No, no!' says she, 'kip out.' " - Dick and Sal, s 23 (See also Folkestone Girls, Folkestone Washerwomen)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 58
    FOLKESTONE WASHER
    n.pl. Folkestone girls; the name given to heavy rain clouds. - Chilham. "De Folkston gals looked houghed black; Old Walter'd roar'd about; Says I to Sal 'shall we go back?' 'No, no!' says she, 'kip out.' " - Dick and Sal, st 23 (See also Folkestone Girls, Folkestone Lasses)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 58
    FOLKESTONE-BEEF foa-ksun beef
    n. Dried dog-fish. "Most of the fishermen's houses in Folkestone harbour are adorned with festoons of fish hung out to dry; some of these look like gigantic whiting. There was no head, tail or fins to them, and I could not make out their nature without close examination. The rough skin on their reverse side told me at once that they were a species of dog-fish. I asked what they were? 'Folkestone-beef,' was the reply." - F. Buckland.
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    FOLKS foa-ks n.pl. The men-servants. - East Kent. "Our folks are all out in de fill." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    FOOTROAD
    n. A foot-path.- R Cooke. Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977)
    FOR for prep. Used in adjectival sense, thus, "What for horse is he?" i.e., What kind of horse is he.
    "What for day is it?" i.e., What kind of day is it. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 58
    FORCED foa-st vb. Obliged; compelled. "He's kep' going until last Saddaday he was forced to give up." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 58
    FORE-ACRE for-u'-kur n. The headland; the land at the ends of the field where the furrows cross. (see also Forical) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 58
    Page 116 of 378
    FORECAST foa-rkaast n. Forethought. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    FORE-DOOR foa-r-doar n. The front door. "He came to the fore door." A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    FOREHORSE foa-r-hors n. The front horse in a team of four. - East Kent. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    FOREIGNER fur-inur n. A stranger who come out of the sheers, and is not a Kentish man. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    FORE-LAY foa-r-lai vb. To way-lay. "I slipped across the field and fore-laid him." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    (see also Furriner) Page 58
    FORELONG
    prep. Before long; very soon. TheDialectofKent(c1950)
    FORERIGHT
    "I'll be there forelong. Soons (as soon as) I fenaged this job. Page 37
    foa-rr'eit
    adj.or adv. Direct; right in front; straight forward. "It (i.e., the river Rother) had heretofore a direct and foreright continued current and passage as to Appledore, so from thence to Romney." - Somner, Ports and Forts, p 50.
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 58
    FORESTAL foa-rstul
    n. A farm-yard before a house; a paddock near a farm house; the house and home-building of a farm; a small opening in a street or lane, not large enough to be called a common. As a local name, forstalls seem to have abounded in Kent; as for instance, Broken Forestall, near Buckley; Clare's Forstall, near Throwley, and several others. (see also Forstal, Fostal (1) & (2)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 58
    FORICAL for-ikl n. A headland in ploughing (see also Fore-acre) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 58
    FORSTAL for-stul
    n. (1) A farm-yard before a house; a paddock near a farm house; the house and home- building of a farm; a small opening in a street or lane, not large enough to be called a common. As a local name, forstalls seem to have abounded in Kent; as for instance, Broken Forestall, near Buckley; Clare's Forstall, near Throwley, and several others. (see also Forestal, Forstal (2), Fostal)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 58
    FORSTAL
    n. (2) see Gordon Ward's note on 'Forestall' in Arch. Cantiana 746 pp 207-209 Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977) Page 58
    FOSTAL fost-ul
    n. A farm-yard before a house; a paddock near a farm house; the house and home-building of a farm; a small opening in a street or lane, not large enough to be called a common. As a local name, forstalls seem to have abounded in Kent; as for instance, Broken Forestall, near Buckley; Clare's Forstall, near Throwley, and several others. (see also Forstal (1) & (2) , Forestal)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    FOTHER
    n. Fodder - R. Cooke (see also Fodder) Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977)
    FOUT fou-t vb. Fought; being p.t. and pret. of to fight. - Sittingbourne. "Two joskins fout one day in a
    chalk pet, until blood run all over their gaberdines.". ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 59
    FOWER fou-ur num.adj. Four. So pronounced to this day in East Kent, and constantly so spelled in old
    documents. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 59
    FOY foi
    n. A treat given by a person on going abroad or returning home. There is a tavern at Ramsgate called the Foy Boat. "I took him home to number2, the house beside 'The Foy'; I bade him wipe his dirty shoes, that little vulgar boy." - Ingoldsby Legends, Misadventures at Margate.
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 59
    Page 118 of 378
    FOYING foi-ing
    part.Victualling ships; helping them in distress, and acting generally as agents for them. "They who live by the seaside are generally fishermen, or those who go voyages to foreign parts, or such as depend upon what they call foying." - Lewis, p 32
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 59
    FRAIL fr'ail
    n. (1) A small basket; a flail. The flail is rapidly disappearing and going out of use before the modern steam threshing machine. It consists of the following parts: a) The hand-staff or part grasped by the thresher's hands; b) the hand-staff-cap (made of wood), which secured the thong to the hand-staff; c) the middle-bun or flexible leathern thong, which served as the connecting link between hand-staff and swingel; d) the swingle-cap made of leather, which secured the middle-bun to the swingle; e) the swingel (swinj-l) itself, which swung free and struck the corn. There is a proverbial saying, which alludes to the hard work of threshing: "Two sticks, a leather and thong, Will tire a man be he ever so strong."
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    FRAIL frail adj. (2) Peevish; hasty. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    FRAPE fraip vb. (1) To worry; fidget; fuss; scold. "Don't frape about it." (see also Fease) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 59
    FRAPE fraip n. (2) A woman of an anxious temperament, who grows thin with care and worry. "Oh! she's
    a regular frape." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 60
    FRENCH MAY french mai n. The lilac, whether white or purple. Syringa vulgaris. (see also Laylock, Lielock) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 60
    FRESH CHEESE fresh cheez n. Curds and whey. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 60
    FRIG
    vb. To keep hopping, jumping or moving about in an erratic manner. To figet. "He can't keep still a minute Muss Homewood, always on the frig!". "I do wish 'e would stop frigging about Clara when I'm a-trying to get you ready for school." (see also Nettle-frig)
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 37 Page 119 of 378
    FRIGGER
    n. (1) Fidgeter. "Look 'ee yurr, effen (if you do not) keep still, you little frigger, I won't take you up the street to see your grandma, so there."
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 38
    FRIGGER
    n. (2) A person who moves about from place to place, situation to situation, or one who wants a lot of sizing up from time to time; one who is up to all kinds of cute dodges, business ones or otherwise is referred to as "An Old Frigger". "If you be buying or a-selling anything to old man Turk, watch 'un! He be a regular old frigger, and slyer than any fox, and a darnsight more craftier than a weasel !"
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 38
    FRIGHT-WOODS
    n.pl. A hedge or coppice. A thin, scrubby wood, with little or no timber, and consisting mainly of inferior growths such as are found on poor soils, intermixed with heath, etc. Though some of the old woods bearing this name may now, by modern treatment, have been made much thicker and more valuable, they are also still called, as of old, fright-woods, as the Fright Woods, near Bedgebury. In the MS. Accounts of St. John's Hospital, Canterbury, we find frith used for a quick-set hedge - "To enclose the 7 acres with a quyk fryth before the Fest of the Purification." (see also Frith)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    FRIMSY frimz-i adj. Slight; thin; soft. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    FRITH
    n. A hedge or coppice. A thin, scrubby wood, with little or no timber, and consisting mainly of inferior growths such as are found on poor soils, intermixed with heath, etc. Though some of the old woods bearing this name may now, by modern treatment, have been made much thicker and more valuable, they are also still called, as of old, fright-woods, as the Fright Woods, near Bedgebury. In the MS. Accounts of St. John's Hospital, Canterbury, we find frith used for a quick-set hedge - "To enclose the 7 acres with a quyk fryth before the Fest of the Purification."
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 60
    FRORE froa-r pp. Frozen. ". . . . The parching air Burns frore and cold performs the effect of fire." -
    Milton, Paradise Lost, 2. 595. (see also Fruz) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 60
    FRUITING
    vb. Fruit picking. TheDialectofKent(c1950)
    FRUZ fruz pp. Frozen. (see also Frore) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    FRY
    Free. Old Frisian Fri = Old Kentish Fry. (see also Vry) TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863)
    FURBRATS
    n. Fire-brats. The insect Lupisma Saccharina, often found in old houses, especially in and around the fire-places. They resemble tiny shrimps and have the same actions and appearance as the common fresh-water shrimps. Children who are rather prone to spending too much time in front of fires in the winter times are also termed furbrats or firebrats.
    TheDialectofKent(c1950)
    FURNER furn-r n. A baker. French, fournier ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    FURREN PEASIES
    n. 'Foreign' pea-pickers. This particular example of Kent dialect is most confined to the districts around Maidstone, up to roughly a three mile radius and rarely, if ever, heard beyound these limits. "They be furren-peasies from Chatham Town beyent (beyond) Blue Bell Hill, up there!"
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 38
    FURRICK fur-r'ik vb. To forage; to hunt about and rummage, and put everything into disorder whilst looking
    for something. (see also Furridge) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 60
    FURRIGE fur-r'igj vb. To forage; to hunt about and rummage, and put everything into disorder whilst looking
    for something. (see also Furrick) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 60
    FURRINERS
    n. Not foreigners in the true sense, but any person living outside of a parish. Each parish is 'foreign' to others; the people of different parishes are 'foreigners' to each other. "Who be they fellers, Garge?" "Well, surelye, Chawse (Charles), they be furriners up from Headcorn!" (Headcorn being about 3 miles away) (see also Foreigner)
    TheDialectofKent(c1950)
  • G-I
    G
    GABERDINE gab-urdin
    n. A coarse loose frock; a smock frock sometimes called a cow-gown, formerly worn by labouring men in many counties, now fast disappearing. "You call me misbeliever, cut-throat dog, And spit upon my Jewish gaberdine." - Merchant of Venice, Act 1 Sc 3. "Next he disrob'd his gaberdine, And with it did himself resign." - Hudibras, Pt 1 Canto 3.
    A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888) Page 61
    GADS gadz n.pl. Rushes growing in marshy ground. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888) Page 61
    GAFFER gaf-ur n. A master. "Here comes our gaffer!" A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888) Page 61
    GAGEY gai-ji adj. Uncertain; showery; spoken of the weather. "Well, what d'ye think o' the weather? will
    it be fine? It looks to me rather gagey." A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888) Page 67
    GALEY gai-li adj. Boisterous; stormy. "The wind is galey," i.e., blows in gales, in fits and starts.
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    GALLIGASKINS
    n.pl. Trowsers. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    GALLIVANT ABOUT
    vb. Tantamount to 'gadding about'. - West Kent. Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977)
    GALLON gal-un
    n. Used as a dry measure for corn, flour, bread, potatoes. In Kent these dry goods are always sold by the gallon. "I'd far rather pay a shilling for a gallon of bread than have it so very cheap."
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 61
    GALLS gaulz n.pl. Jelly fish. (see also Blue Slutters, Miller's-eyes, Sea-nettles, Sea starch, Sluthers, Slutters,
    Stingers, Water-galls) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    GALORE guloa-r n. Plenty. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    GAMBLE STICK gamb-l-stik n. A stick used to spread open and hang up a pig or other slaughtered animal. (see also
    Gambrel) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 61
    GAMBREL gamb-ril n. A stick used to spread open and hang up a pig or other slaughtered animal. (see also
    Gamble Stick) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    GAMMY gam-I adj. Sticky; dirty. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    GANCE gaans or gans adj. Thin; slender; gaunt, "Them sheep are doing middlin', but there's here and there a one
    looks rather gance." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    GANGWAY gang-wai n. A thoroughfare; a passage; an entry. Properly a sea term. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    GARBAGE gaa-bij n. A sheaf of corn, Latin garba; a cock of hay; a fagot of wood, or other bundle of the
    product or fruits of the earth. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 62
    GARP
    vb. To stare overlong in a bad mannered way. To stare openly at a person, especially if in a conversation or doing anything considered private or personal. Staring with the mouth open. "Don't stand there all a garp, while we are talking. Be off with you, you ill-mannered besom." "He aint got no manners! Always garping about into people's gardens, and windows."
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 41
    GARPED
    vb. Stared. "We said 'good morning' to him and he just stood and garped back at us." TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 41
    GARRET gar-r'it vb. To drive small wedges of flint into the joints of a flint wall. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 62
    GARRETED
    adj. The phrase, "not rightly garreted," means, something wrong in "the top storey". Spoken of a weak and silly person, whose brain is not well furnished.
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 62
    GASKIN gas-kin
    n. Prunus avium, a half-wild variety of the damson, common in hedgerows, and occasionally gathered to send to London, with the common kinds of black cherry, for the manufacture of "port wine."
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 62
    GATE gait
    n. A way from the cliffs down to the sea: - Ramsgate, Margate, Kingsgate, Sandgate, Westgate. "Through these chalky cliffs the inhabitants whose farms adjoin to them, have cut several gates, or ways into the sea, for the conveniency either of fishing, carrying the sea ooze on their lands, etc. But these gates or passages, they have been forced to fill up in time of war, to prevent their being made use of by the enemy to surprise them, and plunder the country." - Lewis, Tenet p 10.
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    GATTERIDGE TREE gat-ur'ij tree n. Prickwood. Euonymus Europaeus. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    GAU gau interj An exclamation, in constant use, expressive of doubt; surprise; astonishment. (see also
    Geu, Goo) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    GAUSE gaus adj. Thin; slender. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    GA VELKIND gav-l-kend
    n. An ancient tenure in Kent, by which the lands of a father were divided among all his sons; or the lands of a brother, dying without issue, among all the surviving brothers; a custom by which the female descendents were utterly excluded, and bastards inherited with legitimate children.
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    GAY gai adj. Lively; hearty; in good health. "I don't feel very gay this morning." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    GAYTHER
    vb. To gather up "Now young Willum, you jist gayther up all they old bines and tie 'em all up to-gayther."( see also To-gayther)
    The Dialect of Kent (c1950)
    GAYZELS gai-zlz n.pl. Black currants, Ribes nigrum; wild plums, Prunis communis. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    GEAT ge-ut n. Gate. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    GEE jee n. (1) A lodging; roost. (see also Chee) A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    GEE jee interj.(2) Go to the off side; command to a horse. - West Kent. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    GELT
    Guilt. Old Kentish 'e' replaces Northern ' i' and Southern 'u'. Gelt (K) = Gult (S) = Gilt(N) = Guilt
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863)
    GENTAIL
    n. (2) A gentil; a maggot used for fishing. - J.H.Bridge. Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977)
    GENTAIL jen-tail n. (1) An ass. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    GENTLEMAN
    n. A person who from age or any other cause is incapacitated from work. "He's a gentleman now, but he just manages to doodle about his garden with a weedin'-spud."
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 63
    GERLOND
    n. Garland. Use of 'e' for 'a'. Old Frisian bend=band; stef=staff; sterk=stark; weter= water. The 'Ayenbite of Inwyt', 1340, contains this word.
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 14
    GERS
    n. Grass. Use of 'e' for 'a'. Old Frisian bend=band; stef=staff; sterk=stark; weter= water. The' Ayenbite of Inwyt', 1340 , contains this word.s. Old English - gars
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 14
    GEU geu interj An exclamation, in constant use, expressive of doubt; surprise; astonishment. (see also
    Gau, Goo) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    GIBLETS jib-lets n.pl. Rags; tatters. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    GIDDYHORN
    n. There is a Giddyhorn Toll, north of Westwell, and a Giddyhorn Lane in Maidstone. Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977) Page 63
    GIFTS gifts
    n.pl. White specks which appear on the finger nails and are supposed to indicate something coming, thus - "A gift on the thumb indicates a present. A gift on the fore-finger indicates a friend or lover. A gift on the middle finger indicates a foe. A gift on the fourth finger indicates a visit to pay. A gift on the little finger indicates a journey to go." - W.F.S.
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 63
    GIG gig n. A billet, or spread bat, used to keep the traces of plough horses apart.(see also Billet,
    Spread-bat) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 63
    GILL gill n. A little, narrow, wooded valley with a stream of water running through it; a rivulet; a
    beck. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 63
    GIMMER gim-ur n. A mistress. "My gimmer always wore those blue and white checked aprons." (1817) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 63
    GIN gin (not jin) vb. Given. "I cou'd a gin de man a smack." - Dick and Sal, st 86. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 63
    GIVE giv vb. To give way; to yield; to thaw. "It gives now," i.e. it is thawing. So, too, the phrase, "It's
    all on the give," means, that a thaw has set in. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 64
    GIVE OVER give oa-vur vb. To leave off; to cease; to stop. "Give over! will ye! I wun't have no more an't." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 64
    GIVEY giv-i adj. The ground is said to be givey when the frost breaks up and the roads become soft and
    rotten. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    GLEAN
    n. A handful of corn tied together by a gleaner. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    GLED
    Glad. Use of 'e' for 'a'. Old Frisian bend=band; stef=staff; sterk=stark; weter= water. The 'Ayenbite of Inwyt', 1340, contains this word.
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 14
    GLIMIGRIM
    n. Punch. "Tom Julmot, a rapscallion souldier, and Mary Leekin, married by license, January 4th, 1748-9. Caspian bowls of well acidulated glimigrim." - Extract from Parish Register of Sea Salter, near Whitstable.
    A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    GLINCE glins adj. Slippery. "The ice is terr'ble glincey." A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    GLINCEY glins-i adj. Slippery. "The ice is terr'ble glincey." A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    GLOOM
    n. (2) An anvil - Steer 'Essex Inventories'. Notes on 'A Dictionary of Kentish Dialect & Provincialisms' (c1977)
    GLOOM
    n. (1) An oven; a grate; a grate back. 416 pounds of gloom - Baldwin Duppa inventory for Hollingbourne Hall, 1789.
    Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977) Page 64
    GLY
    n. Glee. Exactly corresponding to Old Frisian. It is probable, from the forms bry-est, dy-epe, etc, that these words were dissyllabic
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 17
    GO goa
    vb. To get about and do one's work. "He's troubled to go." i.e., he has great difficulty in getting about and doing his work. "He's gone in great misery for some time," i.e., he has gone about his work in great pain and suffering.
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    GOANNA
    n. Guano. - R Cooke. Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977)
    GOD'S GOOD Godz good n. Yeast; barm. It was a pious custom in former days to invoke a benediction, by making
    the sign of the cross over the yeast. (see also Barm, Siesin, Sizzing) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    GOFF gof n. The commonest kind of apple. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    GOGS
    n.pl.Berries - L..E.A.G. (see also Goosegogs, Snottygogs) Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977)
    GOING goa-in n. The departure. "I didn't see the going of him." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    GOING TO'T goa-in tuot Going to do it; as "do this or that;" the answer is "I am going to-t." The frequency with
    which it is used in some parts of Kent renders the phrase a striking one. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    GOL gol n. A young gosling. (see also Gull) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    GOLDING goa-lding n. A lady-bird, so called from the golden hue of its back. (see also Bug (2), Fly-golding,
    Lady-Bug, Lady Cow, Marygold, Merrigo) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 65
    GOLLOP gol-up vb. (1) To swallow greedily; to gulp. "You golloped that down as if you liked it." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 65
    GOLLOP
    vb. (2) To bolt or eat food; or to drink greedily. "Now don't you gollop your food like a pig!" "If it was beer, instead o' medicine the doctor had given ye, ye'd a-golloped that down soon enough."
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 42
    GOO goo interj (1) An exclamation, in constant use, expressive of doubt; surprise; astonishment. (see
    also Gau, Geu) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    GOO
    vb. (2) To go. "I'll goo on the errand grandma." TheDialectofKent(c1950)
    GOODING guod-ing n. The custom of going about asking for gifts on St Thomas' Day, December 21. Still kept
    up in many parts of Kent. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 65
    GOODMAN
    n. An old title of address to the master of a house. 1671 - "To Goodman Davis in his sicknes . . . 6p" - Overseers' Accounts, Holy Cross, Canterbury. ". . . If the goodman of the house had known in what watch the theif would come, he would have watched." - St. Matthew, Ch 24 v 43.
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 65
    GOODY guod-i n. The title of an elderly widow, contracted from goodwife. "Old Goody Knowler lives agin
    de stile." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 65
    GOOED
    vb. Went. "He be gooed down Alvey Lane, to see old Muss Austin over at Honey Farm, sir." TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 42
    GOOING
    vb. Going. "Ire (I am) a-gooing into the packtures (pictures, cinema) at Ashford to see "Blood and Sand", sartnoon."
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 41
    GOOSEBRING
    vb. Goose-berrying. To gather or to pick gooseberries. Goose + B and R of berry + ing = goosebring
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 41
    GOOSEGOGS
    n.pl. Gooseberries. - West Kent. L.E.A.G.1920's. (see also Dabberries, Guozgogs)
    Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977)
    GO-TO goa too vb. To set. "The sun goes to." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    GOULE goul n. Sweet willow. Myrica gale. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    GOYSTER goi-stur vb. To laugh noisily and in a vulgar manner. A goystering wench is a Tom-boy. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 65
    GRABBY grab-i adj. Grimy; filthy. ( see also Grubby) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 65
    GRACIOUS-HEART-ALIV
    interj. A Kentish exclamation of utter surprise. Possibly this is of Roman Catholic origin with the Gracious Heart part of this exclamation. No doubt its earliest beginning was due to someone crying out the religious call of "Gracious Heart - Alive!", over some supposed dead person having been heard about, or turned up after a long period of exile, or presumed missing, in a living state. (see also Hearts Alive!)
    TheDialectofKent(c1950)
    GRAN NIGH gran nei adv. Very nearly. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    GRANABLE granai-bl adv. Very. "De clover was granable wet, So when we crast de medder, We both upan de
    hardle set, An den begun concedir." - Dick and Sal, st 22. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    GRANADA gran-aada n. A golden pippin, ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    GRANDLY grand-li adv. Greatly: as, "I want it grandly." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    GRANDMOTHER'S NIGH
    n. The flower called monk's hood or aconite. Aconitum napellus. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    GRAPE-VINE graip-vein
    n. The vine which bears grapes. In other counties, when they say vine, they mean a grape- vine, as a matter of course; so, when they use the word orchard, they mean an apple-orchard; but in Kent, it is necessary to use distinquishing terms, because we have apple-orchards, and cherry-orchards, hop-vines and grape-vines.
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 66
    GRAT
    adj. Great. Dissyllabic pronounciation contained in the 'Ayenbite of Inwyt, 1340. 'This practice not only agrees with the present custom of the Frisians, but was, no doubt, that of the Anglo-Saxons.' (see also Great)
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 18
    GRATTAN grat-un n. Stubble; a stubble field, otherwise called ersh, or eddish, grotten, podder-gratten. (see
    also Ersh, Gratten, Gratton (1) & (2), Podder-gratten, Rowens) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 66
    GRATTEN grat-un n. (1) Stubble; a stubble field, otherwise called ersh, or eddish, grotten, podder-gratten. (see
    also Ersh, Grattan (1) & (2), Grotton, Podde-gratten, Rowens) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 66
    GRATTEN grat-un vb. (2) To feed on a gratten, or stubble field. To turn pigs out grattening, is to turn them out
    to find their own food. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 66
    GRATTON grat-un n. (1) Stubble; a stubble field, otherwise called ersh, or eddish, grotten, podder-gratten. (see
    also Ersh, Grattan, Gratten, Gratton (2), Podder-gratten, Rowens) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 66
    GRATTON
    n. (2) Stubble. Nicky Newbury uses Gratton for Stubble, and says it is a Kentish word - L.R.A.G. 1978. (see also Ersh, Grattan, Gratten, Podder-gratten, Rowens)
    Notes on 'A Dictionary of Kentish Dialect & Provincialisms' (c1977)
    GRAUM grau-m vb. To grime; dirty; blacken. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    GREAT
    adj. Great. Dissyllabic pronounciation contained in the 'Ayenbite of Inwyt, 1340. 'This practice not only agrees with the present custom of the Frisians, but was, no doubt, that of the Anglo-Saxons.' (see also Grat)
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863)
    GREAT grait n. (2) "To work by the great" is to work by the piece. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    GREAT gurt adv. (1) Very; as "great much," very much. Commonly pronounced gurt. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    GREAT CHURCH grait church n. The Cathedral at Canterbury is always so called at Eastry. "That fil belongs to the Great
    Church," i.e. is part of the possessions of the Dean and Chapter of Canterbury. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888) Page 66
    GREATEN grai-tn vb. To enlarge. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888) Page 66
    GREEDS greedz n.pl. Straw thrown on to the dung-hill. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888) Page 66
    GREEDYGUTS
    n.pl. A glutton. - Plumstead, West Kent. L.R.A.G. Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977) Page 66
    GREEN-BAG
    n. The bag in which hops are brought from the garden to the oast. (see also Poke, Pook).
    A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    GREYBIRD grai-burd n. A thrush. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    GRIDGIRON grij-erin n. Gridiron. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    GRID-IRON
    n. An old bicycle. Also Grit-iron, old grid and old grit. Sometimes referred to as a rattle- trap. No doubt likening an old rickety cycle to a griddle-iron, used in cooking over open fire. meaning that one might get along riding on a griddle-iron just as well and as comfortably. (see also Grit-iron)
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 42
    GRINNYGOG
    n. Perhaps someone with a grinning, stupid face. "You stand there just like a grinnygog." - Plumstead, West Kent. L.R.A.G.
    Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977)
    GRINSTONE grin-stun n. A grindstone. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    GRIP grip
    n. A dry ditch; but about Sittingbourne it is applied to natural channels of a few feet in width, in the saltings on the Kentish coasts. "I crawled along the grip with my gun in my hand until I got within a few rods of 'em."
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 67
    GRIPES, To give the
    phr. You exasperate me. "You give me the gripes." - Plumstead, West Kent. L.R.A.G. (see also Willies)
    Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977) Page 67
    Page 134 of 378
    GRIPING grei-pin vb. The name given in North Kent to the operation of groping at arms' length in the soft mud
    of the tidal streams for dabs and flounders. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    GRIST greist n. Anything that is ground - meal, flour. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    GRISTING grei-sting n. The flour which is got from the lease-wheat. ( see also Grysting) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    GRIT grit vb. To set the teeth on edge; to grate. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    GRIT-IRON
    n. An old bicycle. Also Grid-iron, old grid and old grit. Sometimes referred to as a rattle- trap. No doubt likening an old rickety cycle to a griddle-iron, used in cooking over open fire. meaning that one might get along riding on a griddle-iron just as well and as comfortably. "Clattering old thing! You might as well chuck that old grit-iron you ride into the pond and buy a decent bicycle for once."
    TheDialectofKent(c1950)
    GRIZZLE griz-l vb. To fret; complain; grumble. "She's such a grizzling woman." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    GRIZZLEGUTS
    n. A constantly crying or fretful child. From 'to grizzle'. - Plumstead, West Kent. L.R.A.G. Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977) Page 67
    GROSS groas adj. Gruff, deep-sounding. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 67
    GROVETT groa-vit n. A small grove or wood. "Just by it is a grovette of oaks, the only one in the whole
    island." - Lewis, p.115 ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 67
    GRUBBY grub-i adj. Dirty. "You are grubby, and no mistake." (see also Grabby) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 67
    GRUPPER grup-ur n. That part of a harness of a cart-horse which is called elsewhere the quoilers; the
    breeching. - East Kent. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 67
    GRUPPER-TREE grup-ur-tree n. That part of the harness of a cart-horse which is made of wood, padded next to the horse's
    back, and which carries the redger. - East Kent. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888) Page 67
    GRY
    n. Grey. Exactly corresponding to Old Frisian. It is probable, from the forms bry-est, dy- epe, etc, that these words were dissyllabic
    The Dialect of Kent in the 14th Century. (1863)
    GRYSTING grei-sting n. The flour which is got from the lease-wheat. (see also Gristing) A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    GUESS-COW ges-kou n. A dry or barren cow. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    GUESTING gest-ing vb. Gossipping. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    GUESTLING ges-lin n. (1) An ancient water-course at Sandwich, in which it was formerly the custom to drown
    prisoners. (see Dunes) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 68
    GUESTLING gest-ling
    n. (2) The ancient court of the Cinque Ports, held at Shepway, near Hythe, and other places. "In July, 1688, the Common Council of Faversham commissioned their Deputy-Mayor, two Jurats, the Town Clerk, and a Commoner ' to go to a guestling, which was summoned from the ancient town of Winchelsea, to be holden at the town and port of New Romney, on Tuesday, July 21st;' and 'there to act on the town's behalf, as they should find convenient.' They were absent at the guestling five days." - Archaeologia Cantiana, 14. p 271.
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 68
    GUILE-SHARES gei-l-shairz
    n.pl.Cheating shares; division of spoils; or shares of "wreckage." "Under the pretence of assisting the distressed masters (of stranded vessels) and saving theirs and the merchant's goods, they convert them to their own use by making what they call guile-shares." - Lewis, 34.
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 68
    GULL
    n. A young gosling. (see also Gol) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 65
    GULLIDGE gul-ij n. The sides of a barn boarded off from the middle; where the caving is generally stored.' ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 68
    GUMBLE gumb-l vb. To fit very badly, and be too large, as clothes. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 68
    GUNNER gun-ur n. A man who makes his living by shooting wild fowl, is so called on the north coast of Kent
    and about Sheppey. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 68
    GUO
    vb. Go 'The only examples of this kind (of pronounciation) that are to be found in the 'Ayenbite of Inwyt', 1340, are buone = bone, guo = go, guode =good, guos =goose.'
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 19
    GUODE
    adj. Good. 'The only examples of this kind (of pronounciation) that are to be found in the 'Ayenbite of Inwyt', 1340, are buone = bone, guo = go, guode =good, guos =goose.'
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 19
    GUOS
    n. Goose 'The only examples of this kind (of pronounciation) that are to be found in the 'Ayenbite of Inwyt', 1340, are buone = bone, guo = go, guode =good, guos =goose.'
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863)
    GUOZGOGS
    n.pl Gooseberries. (see also Dabberries, Goosegogs) Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977)
    GURT gurt adj. Great. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    GUTTER GRUB gut-ur-grub n. One who delights in doing dirty work and getting himself into a mess; a low person. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 68
    GUTTERMUD gut-urmud n. The black mud of the gutter, hence any dirt or filth. "As black as guttermud.";
    A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    GUT-WEED
    n. Sonchus arvensis. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    HA
    pro. He. The Dialect of Kent in the 14th Century. (1863)
    HAAZES haa-ziz n.pl. Haws. Fruit of Crataegus oxyacantha. (See also Aazes, Harves, Haulms and Figs) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 69
    HADN'T OUGHT hadn't aut phr. Ought not. "He hadn't ought to go swishing along as that, no-how." (see also No ought) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 69
    Page 138 of 378
    HAGGED hagid adj. Thin; lean; shrivelled; haggard. "They did look so old and hagged; " spoken of some
    maiden ladies living in another parish, who had not been seen for some time by the speaker.
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    HAGISTER hag-ister n. A magpie. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    HAIR hair n. The cloth on the oast above the fires where the hops are dried. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    HALF MOON
    n. 5 bushel basket measures, especially for hops. - East Kent. Nicky Newbury. (see also Moon)
    Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977)
    HALF-AMON haaf-ai-mun n. A half-amon, is a hop, step and jump. (see also Amon) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    HALF-BAPTIZED
    Privately baptised. "Can such things be!" exclaimed the astonished Mr. Pickwick. "Lord bless your heart, sir," said Sam, "why, where was you half-baptised? - that's nothin', that a'nt." - Pickwick Papers, Ch 13.
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 69
    HALM haam n. Stubble gathered after the corn is carried, especially pease and beans' straw; applied, also,
    to the stalks or stems of potatoes and other vegetables. (see also Hame, Haulm, Helm) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 69
    HALMOT hal-mut n. The hall mote; court leet or manor court; from the Saxon heal-mot, a little council. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 69
    HALZEN
    n.pl. Saints. Noun forming plural in 'en'. TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 20
    HAME haim n. Pease straw. (see Halm, Haulm, Helm) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    HAMPER hamp-ur vb. To injure, or throw anything out of gear. "The door is hampered.". ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    HAMPERY ham-pur'i adj. Shaky; crazy; ricketty; weak; feeble; sickly. (see also Ampery) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    HAND-COLD
    adj. Cold enough to chill the hands. "There was a frost down in the bottoms, for I was right- down hand-cold as I come up to the great house." (see also Finger-cold)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 70
    HANDFAST
    adj. Able to hold tight. "Old George is middlin' handfast to-day" (said of a good catch at cricket.)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 70
    HANDFUL
    n. An anxiety; to have a handful is to have as much as a person can do and bear. "Mrs S. says she has a sad handful with her mother."
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 70
    HAND-HOLD
    n. A holding for the hands. "'Tis a plaguey queer job to climb up there, there an't no hand- hold."
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    HANDSTAFF hand-staaf n. The handle of a flail. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    HANGER hang'r n. A hanging wood on the side of a hill. It occurs in the names of several places in Kent -
    Betteshanger, Westenhanger, etc. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 70
    HANK hangk n. A skein of silk or thread. So we say a man has a hank on another; or, he has him
    entangled in a skein or string. (see also Hink) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    HAPPY-HO
    adj. Apropos. "My father was drownded and so was my brother; meaning that it was a curious coincidence.
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    now that's very happy-ho!" Page 70
    HAPS haps n. (1) A hasp or fastening of a gate. - P. 1631 - "For charnells and hapses for the two
    chests in our hall." - MS. Accounts, St John's Hospital, Canterbury. (see also Hasp, Hapse) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 70
    HAPS haps vb. (2) Happens. "Now haps you doänt know." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 71
    HAPSE haps
    vb To fasten with a hasp; to fasten. In the Weald of Kent hapse is used for the verb, and hasp for the noun, e.g. "Hapse the gate after you!" "I can't, the hasp is gone." (see also Haps (1), Hasp)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 71
    HARBOUR
    vb. To entice away. "'Tis the big one what harbours the little one away from home." - R Cooke.
    Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977)
    HARCELET haa-slit n. The heart, liver and light of a hog. (see also Harslet, Haslet) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    HARD-FRUIT
    n. Stone-fruit, plums etc. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    HARDHEWER haa-dheur n. A stonemason. The word occurs in the articles for building Wye Bridge, 1637. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 71
    HARKEE
    vb. (1) Hark; Hark ye; Listen. "Harkee, Bob! That old dog-fox be a-calling down in Frite Wood."
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 45
    HARKEE
    vb. (2) To listen and keep quiet, "Now, harkee! There's a something moving in that old ditch running out of Thorne Pond."
    TheDialectofKent(c1950)
    HARKY haa-ki interj. Hark! (see also Harkee (1) & (2)) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    HARSLEM haa-zlum n. Asylum. "When he got to settin' on de hob and pokin' de fire wid's fingers, dey thought
    'twas purty nigh time dey had him put away to de harslem." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    HARSLET haa-zlet n. The heart, liver and light of a hog. ( see also Harcelet, Haslet ) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    HARVES haa-vz n.pl. Haws. (see also Aazes, Haazes, Haulms and Figs) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    HARVEST haa-vist vb. To gather in the corn; to work in the harvest-field, e.g. "Where's Harry?"
    harvesting 'long with his father." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    HARVESTER haa-vistur n. A stranger who comes into the parish to assist in the harvest. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    HASLET haz-lit n. (1) The heart, liver and light of a hog. ( see also Harcelet, Harslet ) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    "Oh! he's Page 71
    HASLET
    n. (2) Cf the Northern English word, Haslet, a kind of preserved meat, possibly containing offal.
    Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977) Page 71
    HASP haasp n. A hasp or fastening of a gate. - P. 1631 - "For charnells and hapses for the two chests
    in our hall." - MS. Accounts, St John's Hospital, Canterbury. (see also Haps (1), Hapse)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    HASSOCK
    n. (2) Immature ragstone. - J.H.Bridge. 1949. Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977)
    HASSOCK has-ok n. (1) A large pond. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    HASSOCKS
    n.pl. (2) A corruption of Tussocks: rough, tough clumps of grasses in isolated positions in fields or in the grass verges of roadsides.
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 45
    HASSOCKS
    n.pl. (1) Stone chippings used instead of gravel for making up paths and private minor roads. TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 45
    HASTY hai-sti adj. Heavy; violent. Often used of rain. "It did come down hasty, an' no mistake." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 71
    HATCH hach n. A gate in the roads; a half-hatch is where a horse may pass, but not a cart. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 71
    HATCH-UP hach up vb. To prepare for. "I think it's hatching up for snow." "She's hatching up a cold." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 71
    HATY
    vb. To hate. Anglo-Saxon conjugation. TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863)
    HAUL hau-l vb. To halloo; to shout. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    HAULM haum n. Stubble gathered after the corn is carried, especially pease and beans' straw; applied, also,
    to the stalks or stems of potatoes and other vegetables. (see also Halm, Hame, Helm) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 69
    HAULMS AND FIGS hau-mz und figz n.pl. Hips and haws, the fruit of the hawthorn (Crataegus oxyacantha) (see also
    Aazes,Haazes, Harves) and the dog-rose (Rosa canina) (see also Wind-bibber, Canker-berry) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 72
    HA VE hav vb. To take; lead; as, "Have the horse to the field." "Have her forth of the ranges and
    whoso followeth her let him be slain with the sword." - 2 Chronicles, Ch 23 v 14. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 72
    HAW hau n. A small yard or inclosure. Chaucer has it for a churchyard. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 72
    HA WK hauk vb. To make a noise when clearing the throat of phlegm. An imitative word. "He was
    hawking and spetting for near an hour after he first got up." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    HA WMELL
    n. A small close or paddock. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    HAYNET
    n. A long net, often an old fish net, used in cover shooting to keep the birds and flick from running out of the beat.
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 72
    Page 144 of 378
    HAY-SHOVE
    n. A hay-shove is a pitchfork for loading hay on a wagon. - Example given to Maidstone Museum, March 1953. L.R.A.G. (see also Shove)
    Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977)
    HEADLANDS
    n.pl. The ends of a field where the horses turn in ploughing etc.- R Cooke. Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977)
    HEAF heef n. The gaff-hook used by fishermen at Folkestone. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    HEAL heel vb. To hide; to cover anything up; to roof-in. "All right! I'll work 'im; I've only just got
    this 'ere row o' taturs to heal in." (see also Hele) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 72
    HEALDE
    vb. Hold. Dissyllabic pronounciation contained in the 'Ayenbite of Inwyt, 1340. 'This practice not only agrees with the present custom of the Frisians, but was, no doubt, that of the Anglo-Saxons.' (see also Hiealde, Hyealde)
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 18
    HEAP
    n. Heap. Dissyllabic pronounciation contained in the 'Ayenbite of Inwyt, 1340. 'This practice not only agrees with the present custom of the Frisians, but was, no doubt, that of the Anglo-Saxons.' (see also Hieap, Hyeap)
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 18
    HEARNSHAW
    n. Heron. (see Shakespeare) (see also Hern, Hernshaw, Kitty Hearn, Kitty Hearnshrow) Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977) Page 74
    HEART haat n. Condition; spoken of ground. "My garden's in better heart than common this year." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 72
    HEARTENING
    adj. Strengthening. "Home-made bread is more heartening than baker's bread." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 72
    Page 145 of 378
    HEART-GRIEF
    n. Severe grief. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888) Page 72
    HEARTH hee-rth n. Hearing; hearing-distance. "I called out as loud's ever I could, but he warn't no wheres
    widin hearth." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 73
    HEARTS ALIVE! haats ulei-v interj. An expression of astonishment at some strange or startling intelligence. "Heart's alive!
    what ever upon ëarth be ya got at?" (see also Gracious-heart-alive!) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 73
    HEA VE heev vb. To throw; to heave a card; to play it; it being, as it were, lifted up or heav'd, before it is
    laid down upon the table.' ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    HEA VEDEN
    n.pl. Heads. Noun forming plural in 'en'. TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863)
    HEAVE-GATE heev-gait n. A gate that does not work on hinges, but which has to be lifted (heaved) out of the sockets
    or mortises, which otherwise keep it in place, and make it look like a part of the fence. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 73
    HEA VENSHARD hevnz-haa-d adv. Heavily; said of rain. "It rains heavenshard." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 73
    HEA VER hee-vur
    n. A crab - Folkestone. "Lord, sir, it's hard times; I've not catched a pung or a heaver in my stalkers this week; the man-suckers and slutters gets into them, and the congers knocks them all to pieces." (see also Ponger, Pung, Punger)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 73
    Page 146 of 378
    HEA W
    vb. Hew. Dissyllabic pronounciation contained in the 'Ayenbite of Inwyt, 1340. 'This practice not only agrees with the present custom of the Frisians, but was, no doubt, that of the Anglo-Saxons.'
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 18
    HEBBE
    vb. Have. Use of 'e' for 'a'. Old Frisian bend=band; stef=staff; sterk=stark; weter= water. The' Ayenbite of Inwyt', 1340, contains this word.
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 14
    HEDDE
    vb. Had. Use of 'e' for 'a'. Old Frisian bend=band; stef=staff; sterk=stark; weter= water. The' Ayenbite of Inwyt', 1340, contains this word.
    The Dialect of Kent in the 14th Century. (1863)
    HEED heed n. Head. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    HEEVE heev vb. (2) To hive bees. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    HEEVE heev n. (1) A hive; a bee-hive. "I doän’t make no account of dese here new-fangled boxes and
    set-outs; you may 'pend upon it de old heeves is best after all." A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888) Page 73
    HEFT hef-t n. The weight of a thing, as ascertained by heaving or lifting it. "This here heeve'll stand
    very well for the winter, just feel the heft of it." A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888) Page 73
    HEG
    n. A hag; a witch; a fairy. "Old coins found in Kent were called hegs pence by the country people."
    A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    HEIST
    vb. Word used by a carter to make a horse lift its foot. - R Cooke. Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977)
    HELE heel vb. To cover. (see also Heal) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 74
    HELER hee-ler n. Anything which is laid over another; as, for instance, the cover of a thurrick or wooden
    drain. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 74
    HELLE
    n. Hill. Old Kentish 'e' replaces Northern ' i' and Southern 'u'. Helle (K) = Hulle (S) = Hill (N)
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 15
    HELL-WEED
    n. A peculiar tangled weed, without any perceptible root, which appears in clover, sanfoin or lucerne, and spreads very rapidly, entirely destroying the plant. Curiously enough, it appears in the second cut of clover, but does not come in the first. Cuscuta epithymum. (See Devil's Thread.)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 74
    HELM helm n. Stubble gathered after the corn is carried, especially pease and beans' straw; applied,
    also, to the stalks or stems of potatoes and other vegetables. (see also Halm, Hame, Haulm) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 69
    HELVING helv-in partc. Gossiping, or "hung up by the tongue." - Tenterden. "Where have you been helving?"
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    HEM
    adv. An intensive adverb - very, exceedingly. "Hem queer old chap, he is!" ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    HEM-A-BIT
    Not a bit. "I aint hem-a-bit left, old mate!" TheDialectofKent(c1950)
    HEMITORY
    n. Fumitory, the plant. - R Cooke Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977)
    HEM-OF-A-WAY
    phr. A long way; A very hem-of-a- way = a very long way. "It's a hem-of-a-way round by the road: but if you cuts caterwise (across) through the fields, it will save you nearly two miles." (see also Limb-of-a-way)
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 46
    HEMWOODS hem-wuodz n.pl. Part of a cart-horses' harness which goes round the collar, and to which the tees are
    fixed; called aimes (hames) in West Kent. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 74
    HEN AND CHICKENS
    n. The ivy-leaved toad-flax, otherwise called Mother of Thousands; and sometimes Roving Sailor. Linaria vulgaris. (see Weasel-snout)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    HENG
    vb. Hang. Use of 'e' for 'a'. Present dialect form i.e. 1863. TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863)
    HENNEN
    n.pl. Hens. Noun forming plural in 'en'. TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863)
    HERE AND THERE A ONE
    adj.phr. Very few and scattered. "There wasn't nobody in church today, only here and there a one."
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 74
    HERN
    n. Heron. "My o my! Look at that hern! They sure have got mighty big wings" (see also Hearnshaw, Hernshaw, Kitty Hearn, Kitty Hearnshrow)
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 45
    HERNRY
    n. Heronry. A heronry may consist, like a rookery, of a great number of nests, situated in almost inaccessable positions in tall trees. "I knowed of a hernry in some oak trees, just off the railway line about a mile beyent Pluckley station on the way to Ashford. But that was a good many years agoo now, and they may and they beeant (may-be-not) there now,"
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 45
    Page 149 of 378
    HERNSHAW hurn-shau n. A heron. (see also Hern, Hearnshaw, Kitty Hearn, Kitty Hearn Shrow) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    HERRING-FARE her-r'ing-fair n. The season for catching herrings, which begins about the end of harvest. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    HERRING-HANG
    n. A lofty square brick room, made perfectly smoke-tight, in which the herrings are hung to dry.
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 74
    HERRING-SPEAR
    n. The noise of the flight and cries of the red-wings; whose migration takes place about the herring fishing time. "I like's to hear it," says an old Folkestone fisherman, "I always catches more fish when it's about."
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    HERTEN
    n.pl. Hearts. Noun forming plural in 'en'. TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863)
    HEST
    vb. Hast. Use of 'e' for 'a'. Old Frisian bend=band; stef=staff; sterk=stark; weter= water. The' Ayenbite of Inwyt', 1340, contains this word.
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863)
    HESTEN
    n.pl. Behests. Noun forming plural in 'en'. TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863)
    HETCH
    vb. To move. "Hetch a bit there and let me pass." Variations of Hetch, Hitch, Hotch mean the same in most instances. Sometimes several of these words will be used in a speech - "Oi went hotching (walking) a-down the hill, and hetch-up (pulled up) at the bottom, for the storm water was a-rushing over the rord-way. So I hitched meself over the bank and the old fence and cut through the beech wood. Oi must have hitched (pulled) me innards a bit when oi hitched-up (climbed or moved up) they bank, for my old guts were sore; but the doctor ,who oi seed smarning (this morning) said it wor nothing to worrit about." (see also Hitch, Hotch)
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 47
    HETCH-UP
    vb. (1) To move up. "Now then, Harry, hetch-up, and make room for your poor old mum!" "Wait till I've a-hetched me trousers a bit: the blinkin' braces must have stretched a tidy bit" (also Hitch-up, Hotch-up)
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 47
    HETCH-UP
    vb. (2) To lift up. "Gie us a hetch-up with this sack o' corn Pete." (also Hitch-up; Hotch-up) TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 47
    HETHER hedh-ur adv. Hither. "Come hether, my son." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 75
    HEYCOURT hai-koart n. The High Court , or principal Court of the Abbot's Convent of St. Augustine's, Canterbury. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 75
    HICKET hik-it vb. To hiccup, or hiccough. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 75
    HIDE
    n. A place in which smugglers used to conceal their goods. There were formerly many such places in the neighbourhood of Romney-marsh and Folkestone.
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 75
    HIDE AND FOX heid und foks n. Hide and seek; a children's game. "Hide fox, and after all." - Hamlet, Act 4 Sc 2, means,
    let the fox hide and the others all go to seek him. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 75
    HIEALDE
    vb. Hold Dissyllabic pronounciation contained in the 'Ayenbite of Inwyt, 1340. 'This practice not only agrees with the present custom of the Frisians, but was, no doubt, that of the Anglo-Saxons.' (see also healde, hyealde)
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 18
    HIEAP
    n. Heap. Dissyllabic pronounciation contained in the 'Ayenbite of Inwyt, 1340. 'This practice not only agrees with the present custom of the Frisians, but was, no doubt, that of the Anglo-Saxons.' (see also Heap, Hyeap)
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 18
    HIGGLER hig-lur n. (1) A middleman who goes round the country and buys up eggs, poultry, etc , to sell
    again. So called, because he higgles or haggles over his bargains. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 75
    HIGGLER
    n. (2) Phippen's Directory for Maidstone, 1845, p 49. Under Miscellaneous Tradesmen:- Fearn, J. Higgler, Marsham Street.
    Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977) Page 75
    HIGH-LOW
    vb. (1) To seek all over the place; to search high and low. "We searched high-low for they young ducks but couldn't find they. Seems to me that a fox like as not worked they away into the wood and driv them off and killed them some quiet place."
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 46
    HIGH-LOW
    n. (2) High-heeled ladies shoes. The shoes are low at the front in comparison with them being high at the back. "Look at that besom! Wearing they break-your-neck high-lows. They be no good for honest country gals; though I did see them French gals wear them in Paris when I was out there in t'army in '14-18, mairt."
    The Dialect of Kent (c1950)
    HIJIMMY KNACKER
    n. The horse game. - West Kent. L.R.A.G.1920's. Notes on 'A Dictionary of Kentish Dialect & Provincialisms' (c1977)
    HIKE heik vb. (1) To turn out. "He hiked 'im out purty quick." A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    HIKE
    vb. (2) To walk, carrying a load. - J H Bridge. Notes on 'A Dictionary of Kentish Dialect & Provincialisms' (c1977)
    HILL hil n. The small mound on which hops are planted; a heap of potatoes or mangold wurzel. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 75
    HINE
    pro. Him. Preserved in the modern provincialism en or un, as "I see en" - "I see him." TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 21
    HINK hingk n. (2) A hook at the end of a stick, used for drawing and lifting back the peas, whilst they
    were being cut with the pea-hook. The pea-hook and hink always went together. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 75
    HINK hingk n. (1) A skein of silk or thread. So we say a man has a hank on another; or, he has him
    entangled in a skein or string. (see also Hank) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    HIS
    pro. Them. (Hise) In the 'Ayenbite of Inwyt', 1340' TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863)
    HISE
    pro. Her. The accusative of Hi, she. In the 'Ayenbite of Inwyt', 1340. TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863)
    HIS-SELF
    pro. Himself. "Ah! when he's been married two or three weeks he won't scarcely know his- self. He'll find the difference, I lay !."
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 75
    HIST
    vb. A call; a signal. "Just give me a hyste, mate, when 'tis time to goo." (see also Hoist, Hyste)
    Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977) Page 75
    HITCH
    vb. (2) To move or walk. "My old grand-dad goes a-hitching along the rord more like a young-un than an old-un." (also Hetch; Hotch)
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 47
    HITCH
    vb. (4) To pull or draw up. "Hitch us a bucket o' water from the well, John, then I'll water they hens and lock 'em up for t'night." (also Hetch; Hotch)
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 46
    HITCH
    vb. (3) To hold. " Don't keep hitching on to me skirts Bessie! Walk along side o' me like a lady instead of a country gawp." (also Hetch; Hotch)
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 46
    HITCH
    vb. (1) To move. "Oi wish these people waiting for the bus would hitch along a bit." (also Hetch, Hotch)
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 47
    HITCH-OVER
    vb. To move over; to push over. "Give oi a hitch-over this wall. (also Hetch-over; Hotch- over)
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 48
    HITCH-UP
    vb. (2) To get married. "Our Bill and young Liz be getting hitched-up end o' June." (also Hetch-up; Hotch-up)
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 48
    HITCH-UP
    vb. (1) To push up; to move up, "Give me a hitch-up this tree." "My boss give me a hitch-up (promotion) at my job this week." (also Hetch-up; Hotch-up)
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 48
    HOATH hoa-th n. Heath; a word which is found in many place-names, as Hothfield, Oxenhoth, Kingshoth.
    (see also Hoth) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    HOBBL'D hobl-d pp. Puzzled; baffled; put to a difficulty. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    HOBBLE hob-l n. An entanglement; difficulty; puzzle; scrape. "I'm in a regular hobble." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    HOB-LAMB
    n. A lamb that had been brought up on the bottle, when the parent sheep may have died, or had more lambs born than possible to cope with regarding their feeding.. "Say, my Janie! Look at they hob-lamb o' farmers, how he do follow the maid all over the place, like a pet dog! For Mary there she surelye did a-feed that poor little motherless lambkin from the hour that it was born." (see also Cade-lamb, Sock-lamb)
    The Dialect of Kent (c1950)
    HOCKATTY KICK hok-utikik- n. A lame person. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    HOCKER-HEADED hok-ur-hed-id adj. Fretful; passionate. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    HODENING hod-ning partc. A custom formerly prevelant in Kent on Christmas Eve; it is now discontinued, but the
    singing of carols at that season is still called hodening. (see Hoodening) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 76
    HOG-BACKED hog-bakt adj. Round backed; applied to a vessel when, from weakness, the stem and stern fall lower
    than the midddle of the ship. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 76
    HOG-HEADED
    adj. Obstinate. "He's such a hog-headed old mortal, 'taint no use saying nothing to him."
    A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    HOG-PAT
    n. A trough made of boards. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    HOILE hoi-l n. The beard or stalk of barley or other corn. (see also Iles) A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    HOIST
    vb. A call; a signal. "Just give me a hyste, mate, when 'tis time to goo." (see also Hist, Hyste)
    Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977) Page 75 Page 155 of 378
    HOLL hol vb. To throw; to hurl. "Ha! there, leave off hulling o' stones." (see also Hull (2) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 76
    HOLLY-BOYS AND IVY-G
    n.pl. It was the custom on Shrove Tuesday in West Kent to have two figures in the form of a boy and girl, made one of holly, the other of ivy. A group of girls engaged themselves in one part of the village in burning the holly-boy, which they had stolen from the boys, while the boys were to be found in another part of the village burning the ivy-girl, which they had stolen from the girls, the ceremony being, in both cases, accompanied by loud huzzas.
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 76
    HOLP hoalp
    vb. Helped; gave; delivered. "Assur also joined with them, and have holpen the children of Lot." Psalm 83 v 8. "What did you do with that letter I gave you to the wheelwright?" "I holp it to his wife."
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 77
    HOLP-UP
    vb. Over-worked. "I dunno as I shaänt purty soon look out another plááce, I be purty nigh holp-up here, I think."
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    HOLT hoal-t n. A wood. Much used in names of places, as Bircholt, Knockholt, etc. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    HOME-PEASIES
    n.pl. Home or Local pea-pickers. "The home-peasies are the best to employ because they don't grumble so much about their work or the payments." - Maidstone and Aylesford area.
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 50
    HOME-PICKERS
    n.pl. Local pickers for hop or friut picking. - Weald , Mid-Kent and Ashford Valley areas . TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 50
    HOMESTALL hoa-mstaul n. The place of a mansion-house; the inclosure of ground immediately connected with the
    mansion-house. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 77
    Page 156 of 378
    HOMMUCKS hom-uks n.pl. Great, awkward feet. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 77
    HOND
    n. Hand. The use of 'o' for 'a'. The Old Frisian, which has been quoted in support of these forms has brond, hond, lond, for brand, hand, and land.
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863)
    HONDEN
    n.pl. Hands. Noun forming plural in 'en'. TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863)
    HONGE
    vb. Hang. The use of 'o' for 'a'. The Old Frisian, which has been quoted in support of these forms has brond, hond, lond, for brand, hand, and land.
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 13
    HOODENING huod-ning
    n. The name formerly given to a mumming or masquerade. Carol singing, on Christmas Eve, is still so called at Monkton, in East Kent. The late Rev. H. Bennett Smith, Vicar of St. Nicholas-at-Wade, the adjoining parish to Monkton. wrote as follows in 1876, - "I made enquiry of an old retired farmer in my parish, as to the custom called Hoodning. He tells me that formerly the farmer used to send annually round the neighbourhood the best horse under the charge of the wagoner, and that afterwards instead, a man used to represent the horse, being supplied with a tail, and with a wooden (pronounced ooden or hooden) figure of a horse's head, and plenty of horse-hair for a mane. The horse's head was fitted with hob-nails for teeth; the mouth being made to open by means of a string, and in closing made a loud crack. The custom has long since ceased."
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 77
    HOOGOO hoo-goo
    n. A bad smell; a horrible stench.; evidently a corruption of the French haut gout. "A Kentish gamekeeper, noticing a horrible stench, exclaimed: "Well, this is a pretty hoogoo, I think!" (see also Fargo, Fogo, Hum (2), Hussle, Ponk, Wiff)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 77
    HOOK huok n. An agricultural tool for cutting, of which there are several kinds, viz., the bagging-hook,
    the ripping-hook, etc. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 78
    HOP
    n. (2) Wood fit for hop- poles. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    HOP hop vb. (1) To pick hops. "Mother's gone out hopping." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    HOP DOLLEY
    n. A cart with wooden sides and 3 iron wheels, used for trundling through the hop alleys. - Term used in Faversham district. L.R.A.G. (see also Dung dolley etc)
    Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977)
    HOP-BIND hop-beind n. The stem of the hop, whether dead or alive. (see also Bine) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    HOP-DOG hop-dog n. (1) A beautiful green caterpillar which infests the hop-bine, and feeds on the leaves. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 78
    HOP-DOG hop-dog n. (2) An iron instrument for drawing the hop-poles out of the ground, before carrying them
    to the hop-pickers. (see Dog (1) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    HOPE hoap n. A place of anchorage for ships. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    HOPKIN hop-kin
    n. A supper for the work-people, after the hop-picking is over. Not often given in East Kent now-a-days, though the name survives in a kind of small cake called huffkin, formerly made for such entertainments. (see also Huffkin, Hufkin,Wheatkin)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    HOPPER hop-ur n. A hop-picker. "I seed the poor hoppers coming home all drenched." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    HOP-PERIWINKLE
    n. A horse game, played by Maistone boys. "Buck, buck, how many fingers have I up." In West Kent and South East London the game is called Woptiddywopwop. - L.R.A.G. 1930's & 1940's.
    Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977) Page 78
    HOPPING hop-ing n. The season of hop-picking. "A fine harvest, a wet hopping." - Eastry Proverb.. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 78
    HOP-PITCHER hop-pichur n. The pointed iron bar used to make holes for setting the hop-poles, otherwise called a dog, a
    hop-dog, or a fold-pitcher. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    HOP-SPUD
    n. A three-pronged fork, with which the hop grounds are dug. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    HORN haun n. A corner. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    HORN-FAIR
    n. (1) An annual fair held at Charlton, in Kent, on St. Luke's Day, the 18th of October. It consists of a riotous mob, who, after a printed summons, disperse through the adjacent towns, meet at Cuckold's Point, near Deptford, and march from thence, in procession through that town and Greenwich to Charlton, with the horns of different kinds upon their heads; and, at the fair, there are sold ram's horns, and every sort of toy made of horn; even the ginger-bread figures have horns. It was formerly the fashion for men to go to Horn-fair in women's clothes.,
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 78
    HORN-FAIR
    n. (2) My grandfather, Christopher Allen, went to the Horn Fair when a young man. - see R.H.Goodsall, A Third Kentish Patchwork. p 104.
    Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977)
    HORNICLE
    n. (2) A dragonfly. - J H Bridge. Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977)
    HORNICLE horn-ikl n. (1) The hornet. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    HORNY-BUG
    n. A cockchafer. - Plumstead, West Kent. L.R.A.G. 1920's. Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977)
    HORSE hors n. (1) The arrangement of hop-poles, tied across from hill to hill, upon which the pole-pullers
    rest the poles, for the pickers to gather the hops into bins or baskets. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    HORSE hors vb. (2) To tie the upper branches of the hop-plant to the pole. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    HORSE EMMETS hor-z em-utz n.pl. Large ants. (see also Emmet) A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    HORSE PEPPERMINT hors pep-r-mint n. The common mint. Mentha sylvestris. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    HORSEBUCKLE hor-sbuk-l n. A cowslip. Primula veris. (see also Cove-keys, Culver Keys, Paigle, Pegle) A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888) Page 79
    HORSE-KNOT
    n. The knap-weed; sometimes also called hard-weed. Centaurea nigra. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 79
    HORSE-LOCK hors-lok n. A padlock. AD 1528 - "Paid for a hors lock . . . 6d." - Accounts of St. John's Hospital,
    Canterbury. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 79
    Page 160 of 378
    HORSENAILS hors-nailz n.pl.Tadpoles. Probably so called because, in shape, they somewhat resemble large nails. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 79
    HORSE-ROAD hors-road
    n. In Kent, a road is not divided as elsewhere, into the carriage-road and the foot-path; but into the horse-road and the foot-road. This name carries us back to the olden times when journeys were mostly made on horseback.
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 79
    HORSES
    n.pl.To set horses together, is to agree. "Muster Nidgett and his old 'ooman can't set their horses together at all, I understand'."
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 79
    HORT hort vb. Hurt. "Fell off de roof o' de house, he did; fell on's head, he did; hort 'im purty much, I
    can tell ye." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 80
    HOTCH hotsh
    vb. (1) To move awkwardly or with difficulty in an irregular and scrambling way. French, hocher, to shake, jog, etc. "He hotched along on the floor to the top of the stairs." "I hustled though the crowd and she hotched after me." So, when a man walking with a boy keeps him on the run, he is described as keeping him hotching."
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    HOTCH
    vb. (2) To move. (also Hetch, Hitch). TheDialectofKent(c1950)
    HOTCH-UP
    vb. (2) To be worried; to be at a loss; to be unable to cope. "Our poor old squire be all hotched-up with money difficulties they do say over the new taxes, and tis said he be a'gooing to sell the estate!"
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 49
    HOTCH-UP
    vb (3) To be cornered; to be trapped; to be penned in. "The sheep dog got the old sheep hotched-up in a corner of the field."
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 49
    Page 161 of 378
    HOTCH-UP
    vb. (1) To move up. (also Hetch-up, Hitch-up) TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 48
    HOTH hoth n. Heath; a word which is found in many place-names, as Hothfield, Oxenhoth, Kingshoth.
    (see also Haoth) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 76
    HOUGHED huff-id vb. past p. from hough, to hamstring, but often used as a mere expletive. "Snuff boxes,
    shows and whirligigs, An houghed sight of folks." - Dick and Sal, st 9. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    HOUSE houz vb. To get corn in from the fields into the barn. "We've housed all our corn." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    HOUSEL hous-l
    n. Household stuff and furniture. "I doän’t think these here new-comers be up to much; leastways, they didn't want a terr'ble big cart to fetch their housel along; they had most of it home in a wheelbar'."
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 80
    HOVEL hov-l
    n. (2) A piece of good luck; a good haul; a good turn or times of hovelling. In some families, the children are taught to say on their prayers, "God bless father and mother, and send them a good hovel to-night."
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    HOVEL hov-l vb. (1) To carry on the business of a hoveler. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    HOVELER hov-iler
    n. A hoveler's vessel. A Deal boat-man who goes out to the assistance of ships in distress. The hovelers also carry out provisions, and recover lost anchors, chains and gear. They are first-rate seamen, and their vessels are well built and well manned.
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 80
    Page 162 of 378
    HOVER hov-r adj. (1) Light; puffy; raised; shivery; hunched-up. Hence, poorly, unwell. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 80
    HOVER
    adj. (3) The ground or soil is huver when it is friable or loosely bound together. - Nicky Newbury and Billy Buck. 1973. (see also huver)
    Notes on 'A Dictionary of Kentish Dialect & Provincialisms' (c1977) Page
    HOVER hov'r
    vb. (2) To throw together lightly. There is a special used of this word with regard to hops. In East Kent it is the custom to pick, not in bins, but in baskets holding five or six bushels. The pickers gather the hops into a number of small baskets or boxes ( I have often seen an umbrella stand used), until they have got enough to fill the great basket; they then call the tallyman, who comes with two men with the greenbag; one of the pickers (generally a woman) then comes to hover the hops; this is done by putting both hands down to the bottom of the great basket, into which the hops out of the smaller ones are emptied as quickly but gently as possible, the woman all the while raising the hops with her hands; as soon as they reach the top, they are quickly shot out into the green bag before they have time to sag or sink. Thus, very inadequate measure is obtained, as, probably, a bushel is lost in every tally; indeed, hovering is nothing more than a recognized system of fraud, but he would be a brave man who attempted to forbid it.
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 81
    HOVVER
    vb. To be cold, shivery, cramped with the cold. "They poor old chickens are all of a hovver this morning with the cold." (see also Hover (1), Huvver, Kivver (2)
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 50
    HOVVERED-UP
    (2) A mess, a tangle, all lumped together. "This ball of binding twine be all hovvered-up, farmer." "Your garden be hovvered-up with weeds, Chawse."
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 51
    HOVVERED-UP
    vb. (1) Pinched with the cold. "Look at poor old Muss Steves all hovvered-up now the weather be turned right wintery."
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 51
    HOVVERY
    adj. Cold, cramped up and shivering. "I feel mighty hovvery today with all this snow about and the biting old wind." (see also Huvvery)
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 50
    Page 163 of 378
    HOWSOMEDEVER hou-sumdev'r adv. Howsoever. "But howsomdever, doant ram it down tightm but hover it up a bit." (see
    also Howsomever) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 81
    HOWSOMEVER hou-sum-ev-r adv. Howsoever. "But howsomdever, doänt ram it down tight, but hover it up a bit." (see also
    Howsomedever) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 81
    HUCK huk n. (1) The husk, pod, or shell of peas, beans, but especially of hazel nuts and walnuts. (see
    also Hull (1), Shuck(1) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 81
    HUCK huk vb. (2) To shell peas; to get walnuts out of the pods. "Are the walnuts ready to pick?" "No,
    sir, I tried some and they won't huck." (see also Shuck (2) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 81
    HUCKING GLASS BRIDG
    phr. Does not exists. "Like Hucking Glass Bridge." - Maidstone. W.C.Clifford. L.R.A.G. 1949.
    Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977) Page 81
    HUCK-OUT
    vb. To pull anything out. "Huck-out they clothes from the linen cupboard, Janie! TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 51
    HUCKS
    n.pl. (2) The fruit cases of cultivated edible green peas. "Hurry up and shell these pea-hucks, Ethel, or we shant have dinner ready by time fayther comes home!" (see also Shucks)
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 51
    HUCKS
    n.pl. (1) A corruption of Hocks. According to the way the word Hucks is used it can mean either Ankles, Feet or Legs. "That girl sure has got a pair o' pretty hucks." "Shift your hucks you lazy varmint! Oi do'ant want good-for-nothing tramps a-sleeping their time away under my corn shocks."
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 51
    HUFFKIN huf-kin n. A kind of bun or light cake, which is cut open, buttered, and so eaten. (See also Hopkin,
    Hufkin, Wheatkin) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    HUFFLE huf-l n. A merry meeting; a feast. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    HUFKIN huf-kin n. A kind of bun or light cake, which is cut open, buttered, and so eaten. (See also Hopkin,
    Huffkin, Wheatkin) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 81
    HUGE heuj
    adv. Very. "I'm not huge well." Sometimes they make it a dissyllable, hugy. The saying hugy for huge is merely the sounding of the final e, as in the case of the name Anne, commonly pronounced An-ni. It is not Annie. (see also Hugy)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 81
    HUGY heuj-i
    adv. Very. "I'm not huge well." Sometimes they make it a dissyllable, hugy. The saying hugy for huge is merely the sounding of the final e, as in the case of the name Anne, commonly pronounced An-ni. It is not Annie. (see also Huge)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 81
    HULL hul vb. (2) To throw; to hurl. "He took and hulled a gurt libbet at me." (see also Holl) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 82
    HULL hul n. (1) The shell of a pea. "After we have sheel'd them we throw the hulls away." ()see also
    Huck (1), Shuck (1) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    HUM hum vb. (1) To whip a top. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    HUM
    vb,n.(2) To smell badly or to stink. - Plumstead, West Kent. L.R.A.G. (see also Fargo, Fogo, Hoogoo, Hussle, Ponk, Wiff)
    Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977) Page 82
    HUNG UP hung up vb. Hindered; foiled; prevented. "He is quite hung up," i.e., so circumstanced that he is
    hindered from doing what otherwise he would. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    HURR hur adj. Harsh; astringent; crude; tart. "These 'ere damsons be terr'ble hurr." A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    HURRUP
    vb. To walk swiftly with long strides. - S.B.Fletcher. Notes on 'A Dictionary of Kentish Dialect & Provincialisms' (c1977)
    HUSBAND huz-bund n. A pollard. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    HUSS hus n. Small spotted dog-fish. Scyttium canicula. (see also Robin-huss) A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    HUSSLE hus-l vb. (1) To wheeze; breathe roughly. "Jest listen to un how he hussles." A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    HUSSLE
    vb. (2) To smell strongly or badly. "It doesn't half hussle." Possibly used by Chatham naval ratings. -Plumstead, West Kent. L.R.A.G. (see also Farggo, Fogo, Hoogoo, Hum (2), Ponk, Wiff)
    Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977) Page 82
    HUSSLING hus-ling n. A wheezing; a sound of rough breathing. "He had such a hussling on his chest." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 82
    Page 166 of 378
    HUSSY hus-i vb. To chafe or rub the hands when they are cold. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 82
    HUTCH huch
    n. The upper part of a wagon which carries the load. A wagon consists of these three parts: 1) the hutch, or open box (sometimes enlarged by the addition of floats) which carries the corn or other load, and is supported by the wheels; 2) the tug, by which it is drawn; and 3) the wheels on which it runs.
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 82
    HUVER
    adj. The ground or soil is huver when it is friable or loosely bound together.- (Nicky Newbury and Billy Buck. 1973. (see also Hover (3)
    Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977) Page 82
    HUVVER
    vb. To be cold, shivery, cramped with the cold. "They poor old chickens are all of a hovver this morning with the cold." (see also Hover (1, Hovver, Kivver (2)
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 50
    HUVVERY
    adj. Cold, cramped up and shivering. "I feel mighty hovvery today with all this snow about and the biting old wind." (see also Hovvery)
    TheDialectofKent(c1950)
    HUXON huks-n n.pl. The hocks or hams. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    HYEALDE
    vb. Hold. Dissyllabic pronounciation contained in the 'Ayenbite of Inwyt, 1340. 'This practice not only agrees with the present custom of the Frisians, but was, no doubt, that of the Anglo-Saxons.' (see also Healde, Hiealde)
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 18
    HYEAP
    n. Heap. Dissyllabic pronounciation contained in the 'Ayenbite of Inwyt, 1340. 'This practice not only agrees with the present custom of the Frisians, but was, no doubt, that of the Anglo-Saxons.' (see also Heap, Heap)
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 18
    HYSTE heist n. A call; a signal. "Just give me a hyste, mate, when 'tis time to goo." (see also Hist, Hoist)
    A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    ICE eis vb. To freeze. "The pond iced over, one day last week." A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    ICH
    pro. I The Dialect of Kent in the 14th Century. (1863)
    ICILY ei-sili n. An icicle. (see also Aquabob, Cobble, Cock-bell, Cog-bell) A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    IDDEN
    vb. Is not; Isn't. "It idden in there!" The Dialect of Kent (c1950)
    IKEY ei-ki adj. Proud. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    ILES eilz n.pl. Ails, or beards of barley. (see also Hoile) A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    ILLCONVENIENT il-konveen-yunt adj. Inconvenient. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    IN 'OPES in-oaps
    phr. For 'in hopes'. It is very singular how common this phrase is, and how very rarely East Kent people will say I hope; it is almost always, "I'm in 'opes." If an enquiry is made how a sick person is, the answer will constantly be, "I'm in 'opes he's better;" if a girl goes to a new place, her mother will say, "I'm in 'opes she'll like herself and stay."
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 83
    Page 168 of 378
    IN SUNDERS in sun-durz adv. Asunder. "And brake their bands in sunder." - Psalm 107 v 14. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    INKSPEWER ink-speu-r n. Cuttlefish. (see also Man-sucker, Squib (2), Tortoise) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    INNARDLY in-urdli adj. Inwardly. "He's got hurt innardly som'ere." "He says his words innardly." i.e., he
    mumbles. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 83
    INNARDS in-urdz n. The entrails or intestines; an innings at cricket. "They bested 'em first innards." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 83
    INNOCENT in-oasent adj. Small and pretty; applied to flowers. "I do think they paigles looks so innocent-like." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 83
    INSIDE
    n. Workers in Woolwich Arsenal used to say they worked "inside"; probably a reference to the Arsenal walls.
    Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977) Page 83
    INTERFERE in-turfee-r vb. To cause annoyance or hindrance. "I was obliged to cut my harnd tother-day, that's what
    interferes with me." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 83
    INTERRUPT in-turrupt-
    vb. To annoy; to interfere with anyone by word or deed; to assault. A man whose companion, at cricket, kept running against him was heard to say; "It does interrupt me to think you can't run your right side; what a thick head you must have!"
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    IRE
    vb. I am. "Ire a-gooing now," "What d'ye think ire a-doing of?" TheDialectofKent(c1950)
    ISLAND ei-lund n. In East Kent the island means the Isle of Thanet. "He lives up in the island, som'er," i.e. ,
    he lives somewhere in Thanet. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    ITCH ich vb (2) To be very anxious. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    ITCH ich vb. (1) To creep. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    IVY GIRL ei-vi gurl
    n.pl. It was the custom on Shrove Tuesday in West Kent to have two figures in the form of a boy and girl, made one of holly, the other of ivy. A group of girls engaged themselves in one part of the village in burning the holly-boy, which they had stolen from the boys, while the boys were to be found in another part of the village burning the ivy-girl, which they had stolen from the girls, the ceremony being, in both cases, accompanied by loud huzzas.
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 84
    JACK
    n. A turnspit. "Imprimis one Jacke lyne and weight...15s." 1681 Will of John Bateman of Greenway Court, Hollingbourne. (KAO PRe 27/29/86).
    Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977)
    JACK IN THE BOX
    n. A reddish-purple, double polyanthus. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    JACK IN THE HEDGE
    n. A plant, white kilk. Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977)
    JACK-UP jak-up vb. To throw-up work; or give up any-thing from pride, impudence, or bad temper. "They
    kep' on one wik, and then they all jacked-up!" ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 84
    Page 170 of 378
    JAUL jau-l vb. To throw the earth about and get the grain out of the ground when it is sown, as birds
    do. "The bothering old rooks have jauled all de seeds out o' the groun'." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    JA WSY jau-zi adj. Talkative. From the jaws. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    Page 84
    Page 84 phr. "You give me the jim-jams" the same as "you give me the pip." - West Kent. L.R.A.G.
    JIM-JAMS
    Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977)
    JOCK jok vb. To jolt; (the hard form of jog). A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    JOCKEY jok-i adj. Rough; uneven. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    JOCLET jok-lit n. A small manor, or farm. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    JOIND-STOOL joi-nd-stool
    n. A stool framed with joints, instead of being roughly fashioned out of a single black. "Item, in the great parlor, one table, half-a-dowsin of high joind-stooles. . . " - Memorials of Eastry, p 225. (see also Joynd-stool)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    JOKESY joa-ksi adj. Full of jokes; amusing; full of fun. "He's a very jokesy man." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    JOLE joal
    n. The jowl, jaw or cheek; proverbial expression, "cheek by jole" = side by side. "He claa'd hold on her round de nick An' 'gun to suck har jole," (i.e. to kiss her.) - Dick and Sal, st 67.'
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 85
    JOLLY jol-i adj. (1) Fat; plump; sleek; in good condition, used to describe the condition of the body, not
    of the temperament. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 85
    JOLLY
    vb. (2) To be in good health. "Ire feeling jolly this marnin', but I was real peekd-up (queer), this toime, yistday." "She's a rare jolly-looking (very healthy looking) young woman, be Annie Hills."
    TheDialectofKent(c1950)
    JONNIE
    n. A fully grown wild rabbit. (see also Drummer) TheDialectofKent(c1950)
    JOSKIN
    n. A farm labourer (more especially a driver of horses, or carter's mate,) engaged to work the whole year round for one master.
    A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888) Page 85
    JOSS-BLOCK jos-blok n. A step used in mounting a horse. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888) Page 85
    JOUN jou-n vb. Joined. "He jouned in with a party o' runagate chaps, and 'twarn't long before he'd made
    away wid all he'd got." A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888) Page 85
    JOY jau-i n. The common English jay. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888) Page 85
    JOYND-STOOL joi-nd-stool
    n. A stool framed with joints, instead of being roughly fashioned out of a single black. "Item, in the great parlor, one table, half-a-dowsin of high joind-stooles. . . " - Memorials of Eastry, p 225. (see also Joind-stool)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    JUDGMATICAL
    adj. With sense of judgment. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    JULY-BUG jeu-lei-bug n. A brownish beetle, commonly called elsewhere a cockchafer, which appears in July. (see
    also May-bug) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 85
    JUNE-BUG jeu-n-bug n. A green beetle, smaller than the July-bug, which is generally to be found in June. (see
    also Bug) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 85
    JUST
    intensive adv. Very; extremely. "I just was mad with him." "Didn't it hurt me just?" ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 85
    JUSTLY just-li adv. Exactly; precisely; for certain. "I cannot justly say," i.e. I cannot say for certain. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 85
    JUST-SO just-soa adv. Very exactly and precisely; thoroughly; in one particular way. "He's not a bad master,
    but he will have everything done just-so; and you wunt please so, I can tell ye!"
    A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    JUT jut n. A pail with a long handle. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
  • K
    K
    KARFE kaa-f n. The cut made by a saw; the hole made by the first strokes
    wood; from the verb to carve. (see also Carf) A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    KEALS keelz n.pl. Ninepins. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    KECHENE
    n. Kitchen.Old Kentish 'e' replaces Northern ' i' and Southern TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863)
    him without everything is just- Page 85
    of an axe in felling or chopping Page 86
    'u'. Kechene (K) = Kitchen (N) Page 15
    Page 173 of 378
    KEEKLEGS kee-klegz n. An orchis. Orchis mascula. (see also Kites legs) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 86
    KEELER kee-lur
    n. (1) A cooler; being the special name given to a broad shallow vessel of wood, wherein milk is set to cream or wort to cool. In the Boteler Inventory, we find: "In the milke house one brinestock, two dozen of trugs, 9 bowles, three milk keelers, one charne and one table. - Memorials of Eastry, p 228. "Half a butter-tub makes as good a keeler as anything."
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 86
    KEELER
    n. (2) An oblong wooden tub in which country housewives did their washing. It was sometimes referred to as a shawl, but only when mounted upon trestles. (see also Shaul (2), Shaw (2), Shawl, Showle)
    TheDialectofKent(c1950)
    KEEN
    n. A weasel. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    KEEP-ALL-ON
    Page 55
    Page 86
    vb. To continue or persevere in doing something. "He kep-all-on actin' the silly." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 86
    KEG MEG
    n. (2) A contributor to Kent Messenger (1949) goes under this pen man. - L.R.A.G.
    Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977)
    KEG-MEG keg-meg n. (1) A newsmonger; a gossip; a term generally applied to women. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    KELL kel n. A kiln. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    KELTER
    vb. To be out of alignment. "Lookee yurr, young fellers! This hay-stack be all out-o-kelter, and I'm mighty annoyed 'bout it. So get some stout poles and prop 'un up, in case we get a southard gale and blow it over!"
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 55 Page 174 of 378
    KEMPEN
    n.pl. Warriors. Noun forming plural in 'en'. TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863)
    KEN
    n.pl. (3) Kine. Noun forming plural in 'en'. TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863)
    KEN
    n. (1) Kin. Old Kentish 'e' replaces Northern ' i' and Southern 'u'. Ken (K) = Kun (S) = Kin (N)
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 15
    KEN
    n. (2) Kine. (Cows) Old Kentish 'e' replaces Northern ' i' and Southern 'u'. Ken (K) = Kine (N)
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863)
    KEND
    adj. Kind. Old Kentish 'e' replaces Northern ' i' and Southern 'u'. Kind (N)
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863)
    KENTISH FIRE
    Ken (K) = Kund (S) = Page 15
    n. A form of applause: CLAP CLAP clap clap clap. (See "Kentish Express" 1.2.1952.) "I have been wondering if, by any chance, this form of applause could have been brought over to Kent by the Flemish weavers when they came about 1333. The first patients to our V.A.D. Hospital in Southborough in 1914 were all Belgiums. Most of them spoke French, but some only spoke Flemish. At our first entertainment for these soldiers, we were astonished that they all applauded together in rhythm. It is difficult to describe in writing how this clapping went, but the beats were like this:---- ---- - - - The effect was quite remarkable. They said they always applauded in this way. It would be most interesting if "Kentish Fire" could be traced to this Flemish applause, but as I never heard the Kentish variety I could not compare them." - Grace Clarke, Cranbrook. Kent & Sussex Journal vol 1 no 3 April-June 1952.
    Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977) Page 86
    KENTISH MAN
    n. A name given by the inhabitants of the Weald to persons who live in other parts of the county.
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 86
    KEPT GOING kep-goa-ing vb. Kept about (i.e., up and out of bed); continued to go to work. "He's not bin well for
    some time, but he's kep' going until last Saddaday he was forced to give up." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 86
    KERN kur-n vb. To corn; produce corn. "There's plenting of good kerning land in that parish."
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    KESS
    n. Kiss. Old Kentish 'e' replaces Northern ' i' and Southern 'u'. (N)
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863)
    KEST
    Kess (K) = Kuss(S) = Kiss Page 15
    Kast. Use of 'e' for 'a'. Old Frisian bend=band; stef=staff; sterk=stark; weter= water. The' Ayenbite of Inwyt', 1340, contains this word.
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863)
    KETE
    n. Kite. Old Kentish 'e' replaces Northern ' i' and Southern 'u'. TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863)
    KETH
    Kete (K) = Kite (N) Page 15
    (2) Kith. Old Kentish 'e' replaces Northern ' i' and Southern 'u'. Keth (K) = Kuth (S) = Known
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863)
    KETH
    (1) Cuth (Known, as in Uncouth and Kith) Southern 'u'. Keth (K) = Cuth (S) = Known
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863)
    Old Kentish 'e' replaces Northern ' i' and Page 15
    KETTLE-MAN ket-l-man n. Lophius piscatorius, or sea-devil. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    KEYS keez n.pl. Sycamore-seeds. "The sycamore is a quick-growing tree, but troublesome near a house,
    because the keys do get into the gutters so, and in between the stones in the stableyard." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 87
    KIBBERED
    adj. Very cold and shivery. "I'm right kivvered today, down here by the river in this hard East wind off the Medway." - North East Kent.
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 56
    KICK-UP-JENNY kik-up-jin-i
    n. A game played, formerly in every public-house, with ninepins (smaller than skittles) and a leaden ball which was fastened to a cord suspended from the ceiling, exactly over the centre pin; when skilfully handled the ball was swung from the extreme length of the cord, so as to bring down all the pins at once.
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    KIDDLE kid-l vb. To tickle. (see also Kittle (1) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    KIDELS
    n.pl. Fishing nets. - West Kent. Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977)
    KIDW ARE kid-wair n. Peas; beans, etc. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    KILK kilk n. Charlock. Sinapis arvensis, the wild mustard. (see also Cadlock, Kinkle (1) & (2) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 87
    KILLED-DEAD
    vb. Killed outright; killed instantaneously. - Weald and Ashford district. TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 55
    KILN-BRUSH kil-n-brush n. A large kind of fagot, bound with two wiffs or withs, used for heating kilns. (see also
    Baven, Bavin, Bobbin, Pimp, Wiff) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 87
    KINDLEY kei-ndli adj. Productive; used with reference to land which pays for cultivation. "Some on it is kindly
    land and som' on it ain't." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 87
    KING JOHN'S MEN, one of
    A term applied to a short man. "He's one of King John's men, six score to the hundred." Six score, 120, was the old hundred, or long hundred.
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    KINK kingk vb. (2)To hitch; twist; get into a tangle. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    KINK kingk n. (1) A tangle; a hitch or knot in a rope. "Take care, or you'll get it into a kink." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 87
    KINKLE kingk-l n. (3) A tangle; a hitch or knot in a rope. "Take care, or you'll get it into a kink." (see also
    Kink 1) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 87
    KINKLE kingk-l n. (1) Charlock. Sinapis arvensis, the wild mustard. (see also Cadlock, Kilk, Kinkle (2) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 87
    KINKLE
    n. (2) A brassica plant, charlock or kilk. ( see also Cadlock, Kilk, Kinkle (2) Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977) Page 87
    KINTLE kint-l n. A small piece; a little corner. So Bargrove MS. Diary, 1645. - "Cutt owt a kinkle." (see
    also Cantel) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 88
    KIPPERED kip-urd adj. Chapped; spoken of the hands and lips, when the outer skin is cracked in cold weather.
    "My hands are kippered." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 88
    KIPPER-TIME
    n. The close season for salmon. AD 1376 - "The Commons pray that no salmon be caught in the Thames between Gravesend and Henly Bridge in kipper-time, i.e. between the Feast of the Invention of the Cross (14 Sept) and the Epiphany (6 Jan), and that the wardens suffer no unlawful net to be used therein. " - Dunkin's History of Kent, p 46.
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 88
    KISSICK
    n. The spot that is most dry or sore in a Kissicky throat. TheDialectofKent(c1950)
    KISSICKY
    adj. A sore or dry throat. TheDialectofKent(c1950)
    KISSICKY-THROAT
    n. A sore throat. "My, I have a kissicky-throat today! There's a kissick right at the back which keeps making me cough, and me throat is getting more kissicky than ever!"
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 55
    KITES LEGS keets-legs n. Orchis Mascula. (see also Keeklegs) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 88
    KITTENS kit-nz n.pl. The baskets in which fish are packed on the beach at Folkestone to be sent by train to
    London and elsewhere. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 88
    KITTLE
    n. (3) Kettle. "Now Emmie! Put the kittle on the fire, while I cut the bread against the men coming home from work!"
    TheDialectofKent(c1950)
    KITTLE kit-l vb. (1) To tickle. (see also Kiddle) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    KITTLE kit-l adj. (2) Ticklish; uncertain; difficult to imagine. "Upon what kittle, tottering, and uncertain
    terms they held it." - Somner, of Gavelkind, p 129. (see also Kittlish) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 88
    KITTLISH kit-lish adj. Ticklish; uncertain; difficult to imagine. "Upon what kittle, tottering, and uncertain
    terms they held it." - Somner, of Gavelkind, p 129. (see also Kittle) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 88
    KITTY HEARN kit-i hurn n. The heron. (see also Hearnshaw, Hern, Hernshaw, Kitty Hearn Shrow) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 88
    KITTY HEARN SHROW kit-i hurn shroa n. The heron. - Chilham. (see also Hearnshaw, Hern, Hernshaw, Kitty Hearn) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 88
    KITTY-COME-DOWN-TH
    n. The cuckoo pint is so called in West Kent. Arum maculatum (see also Cuckoo-pint, Lady-lords, Lady-keys(1)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    KITTY-RUN-THE-STREET
    n. The flower, otherwise called the pansy or heartsease. Viola tricolor. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    KIVVER
    vb. (2) To shiver. "I be all of a kivver! Can't keep warm no-how. Think I'll stop indoors this afternoon instead of going up onto the Lines to watch the Marines play Chatham Town." - North East Kent - the Medway Towns district of Chatham, Rochester, Gillingham and Strood, also the Isle of Sheppey. (see also Hover (1), Hovver, Huvver)
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 56
    KIVVER
    vb. (1) To cover. "Kivver yourself up or you'll be a-catching of a rare cold now the weather has changed so suddenly." "If you kivver up they potatoes, Bill and I kivver up these, we shall have all the rows kivvered up by suppertime and dark!" - Wealden and Ashford District.
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 56
    KIVVERY
    adj. Shivery. "You look all kivvery, Bert. Better have a glass of hot ale with some ginger in it and turn into bed 'afo you develop a chill." - North East Kent.
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 56
    KNA W
    vb. Know. The Northumbrian dialect retained, as it still does, many pure Anglo-Saxon words containing the long sound of 'a', which the Southern dialect changed into 'o'. This word contained in the 'Ayenbite of Inwyt', 1340, resembles the Northumbrian form.
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 13
    KNET
    vb. Knit. Present dialect form i.e. 1863. Old Kentish 'e' replaces Northern ' i' and Southern 'u'.
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 16
    KNOLL noa-l n. A hill or bank; a knole of sand; a little round hill; used in place names - Knowle,
    Knowlton. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    KNOWED noa-d vb. Knew. "I've knowed 'im ever since he was a boy." A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    KNUCKER nuk-r vb. To neigh. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
  • L
    L
    LACE lais vb. To flog. The number of words used in Kent for chastising is somewhat remarkable. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 89
    LADY COW
    n. Ladybird. (see also Bug (2) ,Fly-golding, Lady-bug, Golding, Marygold, Merigo) Notes on 'A Dictionary of Kentish Dialect & Provincialisms' (c1977) Page
    LADY-BUG lai-di-bug
    n. A lady-bird. This little insect is highly esteemed. In Kent (as elsewhere) it is considered unlucky to kill one, and its name has reference to our Lady, the blessed Virgin Mary, as is seen by its other name, Mary-gold. (see also Bug (2), Fly-golding, Golding, Lady Cow, Marygold, Merigo)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 89
    LADY-KEYS lai-dikee'z n.pl. (1) Lords and ladies; the name given by children to the wild arum. Arum maculatum.
    (see also Cuckoo-pint, Kitty-come-down-the-land-jump-up-and-kiss-me, Lady-Lords) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 89
    LADY-KEYS
    n. (2) Cowslip flowers. - J. H Bridge. (see also Cove-keys, Culver-keys, Horsebuckle, Paigle, Pegle)
    Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977) Page 89 Page 181 of 378
    LADY-LORDS lai-di-lordz n.pl. Lords and ladies; the name given by children to the wild arum. Arum maculatum. (see
    also Cuckoo-pint, Kitty-come-down-the-lane-jump-up-and-kiss-me, Lady-keys (1)) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 89
    LAID IN lai-d in vb. (1) A meadow is said to be laid in for hay, when stock are kept out to allow the grass to
    grow. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 89
    LAID-IN
    vb. (2) This means that a field or fields have been either raked over with a harrow or a type of ancient harrow made from brush-wood and weighed down with heavy baulks of timber or large rocks lashed into position upon the top of the brush-wood harrow. The metal-harrow and the brush-wood harrow both serve the same purpose, which is to break up any droppings of manure; the soft tops of mole and ant-hills; the castes of worms, and to brush up and scratch the ground generally, and so help to clear the surface and aerate it. The brush-wood harrow, a home or farm affair, is generally supposed to be a more effective harrow than the metal type, and of course, not so damaging. Any type of grassland, worked over in this manner, be it meadow, pasture, lawn or grass poultry run, or harvested land to be left to become grass-land is said to be 'laid-in' if harrowed in this way.
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 59
    LAIN lain n. A thin coat (laying) of snow on the ground. "There's quite a lain of snow." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 89
    LAMBREN
    n.pl. Lambs. Noun forming plural in 'en'. TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 20
    LANG
    adj. Long. The Northumbrian dialect retained, as it still does, many pure Anglo-Saxon words containing the long sound of 'a', which the Southern dialect changed into 'o'. This word contained in the 'Ayenbite of Inwyt', 1340, resembles the Northumbrian form.
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863)
    LANT-FLOUR lau-nt-flou-r n. Fine flour. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    LASH OUT lash out vb. To be extravagant with money etc; to be in a passion. "Ye see, he's old uncle he left
    'im ten pound. Ah! fancy, he jus' did lash out upon that; treated every-body he did." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 89
    LASHHORSE losh-us n. The third horse from the plough or wagon, or horse before a pinhorse in the team. - East
    Kent. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 89
    LAST laast n. (1) Ten thousand herrings, with a hundred given in for broken fish, make a last. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 90
    LAST laas-t n. (2) An ancient court in Romney Marsh, held for levying rates for the preservation of the
    marshes. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 90
    LATCHETTY
    adv. Loose or falling to pieces. "Heard but occasionally at the present time is the word 'latchetty', meaning loose or falling to pieces. Examples of its use are:- 'The bolts on the barn- door are getting mighty latchetty (loose).'; 'The old picture frame is latchetty (falling to pieces.'. " Kent(ish?) Express. 1.2.1952
    Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977) Page 90
    LATH ? laidh, lath
    n. The name of an annual court held at Dymchurch. One was held 15th June 1876, which was reported in the Sussex Express of 17th June, 1876. (see also Lathe (1) & (2), Lath days, Lay days)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 90
    LATH DAYS
    n.pl. "Laghedays", Hundred Courts. - Hammond, 'The Story of an Outpost Parish' p 156. (see also Lath, Lathe (1) & (2), Lay days)
    Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977)
    LATHE laidh n. (2) To meet. (see also Lath, Lath days, Lathe (1), Lay days) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    LATHE laidh
    n. (1) A division of the county of Kent, in which there are five lathes, viz., Sutton-at-Hone, Aylesford, Scray, St Augustine's. amd Shepway. Anglo-Saxon, laeth. (see also Lath, Lathe (2), Lath days, Lay days)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 90
    LATHER ladh-ur
    n. Ladder. "They went up the lather to the stage." - MS. Diary of Mr John Bargrave, Fellow of Peterhouse, Cambridge, 1645. Mr Bargarve was nephew of the Dean of Canterbury of that name, and a Kentish man. The family were long resident at Eastry Court, in East Kent. This pronounciation is still common.
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    LA V AST lav-ust n. Unenclosed stubble. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    LAWYER laa-yur n. A long thorny bramble, from which it is not easy to disentangle oneself. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    LAY
    n. (2) The term Ley is a general agricultural term not confined to Kent, but the corruption from Ley to Lay is mostly Kentish in origin. The lay system is divided into two groups: short term and long term. Short-term lays is land land laid down for either pasture or meadow then after two or three year good cropping for fodder or silage, the grass is ploughed in and corn or root crops planted. Long-term lays is land laid down for an indefinate number of years as pasture or meadow land. Short term lays were used extensively during the war years 1939-45. The Old Ley at Pluckley near Ashford was used as a demonstration unit during the war. This pasturage was laid-down before the 1914-1918 war as a permanent lay but served as a short- term lay during the 1939-45 war.
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 59
    LAY lai n. (1) Land untilled. We find this in place-names, as Leysdown in Sheppey. (see also Ley) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 90
    LAY DAYS
    n.pl. Possibly the same as Lath days or Laghedays. "Laghedays", Hundred Courts. - Hammond, 'The Story of an Outpost Parish' p 156. (see also Lath, Lathe (1) & (2), Lath days)
    Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977) Page 90
    Page 184 of 378
    LAYING-IN
    n. The process of raking fields with a harrow. (see Laid-in) TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 59
    LAY-INTO
    vb. To give a beating. "It's no use making friends with such beasts as them (bulls), the best way it to take a stick and lay into them."
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    LAYLOCK
    n. Lilac. - R Cooke. (see also French May, Lielock) Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977)
    LAYSTOLE lai-stoal
    n. A rubbish heap. "Scarce could he footing find in that fowle way, a great lay-stall Of murdered men, which therein strowed lay Without remorse or decent funerall." - The Faerie Queene, 1 v 53.
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    LEACON lee-kun n. A wet swampy common; as, Wye Leacon, Westwell Leacon. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    LEAD leed n. (1) The hempen rein of a plough-horse, fixed to the halter by a chain, with which it is
    driven. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    LEAD leed n. (2) Way; manner. "Do it in this lead," i.e., in this way. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    LEAF
    n. Leaf. Dissyllabic pronounciation contained in the 'Ayenbite of Inwyt, 1340. 'This practice not only agrees with the present custom of the Frisians, but was, no doubt, that of the Anglo-Saxons.' (see also Lyaf, Lyeaf)
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 18
    LEARN lurn vb. To teach. "O learn me true understanding and knowledge." - Psalm 119 v 66 (Prayer
    Book version). ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 91
    LEAS
    vb. Lost. Dissyllabic pronounciation contained in the 'Ayenbite of Inwyt, 1340. 'This practice not only agrees with the present custom of the Frisians, but was, no doubt, that of the Anglo-Saxons.' (see also Lyeas)
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863)
    LEASE leez vb. To glean; gather up the stray ears of corn left in the fields. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    LEASE-WHEAT lee-zweet n. The ears picked up by the gleaners. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    LEASING lee-zing partc. Gleaning. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    LEASTWISE lee-stweiz adv. At least; at all events; anyhow; that is to say. "Tom's gone up int' island, leastwise, he
    told me as how he was to go a wik come Monday." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 91
    LEATHER
    vb. To beat. "Catched 'im among de cherries, he did: and leathered 'im middlin', he did." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 91
    LEAVENER lev-unur, lev-nur n. A snack taken at eleven o'clock; hence, any light, intermediate meal. (see Bever,
    Elevenses, Progger, Scran) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 91
    LEA WDE
    vb. Lewd. (i.e. Lay - Ecclesiastical). Dissyllabic pronounciation contained in the 'Ayenbite of Inwyt, 1340. 'This practice not only agrees with the present custom of the Frisians, but was, no doubt, that of the Anglo-Saxons.'
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 18
    LEDDRE
    n. Ladder. Use of 'e' for 'a'. Old Frisian bend=band; stef=staff; sterk=stark; weter= water. The' Ayenbite of Inwyt', 1340, contains this word.
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 14
    LEER leer
    n. Leather; tape. "I meane so to mortifie myselfe, that in steede of silks I wil weare sackcloth; for owches and braceletes, leere and caddys; for the lute vse the distaffe." - Lilly's Euphues, ed. Arber, p 79.
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    LEES leez n. (2) A row of trees planted to shelter a hop-garden. (see also Lew) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    LEES leez n. (1) A common, or open space of pasture ground. The Leas (leez) is the name given at
    Folkestone to the fine open space of common at the top of the cliffs. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 92
    LEE-SILVER
    n. A composition paid in money by the tenants in the wealds of Kent, to their lord, for leave to plough and sow in time of pannage.
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 92
    LEETY lee-ti adj. Slow; begin-hand; slovenly. Thus they say: "Purty leety sort of a farmer, I calls 'im." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 92
    LEG-TIRED
    adj. "Are ye tired, maäte?" "No, not so terr'bly, only a little leg-tired." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 92
    LEME
    n. Limb. Old Kentish 'e' replaces Northern ' i' and Southern 'u'. Leme (K) = Lime (N) = Limb
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863)
    LENDEN
    n.pl. Loins. Noun forming plural in 'en'. TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863)
    LERRY ler-r'i n. The "part" which has to be learnt by a mummer who goes round championing. -
    Sittingbourne. (see also Lorry, Lurry) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 92
    LESTE
    Last Use of 'e' for 'a'. Old Frisian bend=band; stef=staff; sterk=stark; weter= water. The 'Ayenbite of Inwyt', 1340, contains this word.
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863)
    LET
    vb. To leak; to drip. "That tap lets the water." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    Page 92 n. A vessel, wherein they put ashes, and then run water through, in making lye.
    LETCH let-ch ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    LEW loo n. (1) A shelter. Anglo-Saxon hléow, a covering; a shelter. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    LEW loo adj. (3) Sheltered. "That house lies lew there down in the hollow." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    LEW loo n. (2) A thatched hurdle, supported by sticks, and set up in a field to screen lambs, etc, from
    the wind. "The lambs 'ud 'ave been froze if so be I hadn't made a few lews." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 92
    LEW loo
    vb. (4) To shelter, especially to screen and protect from the wind. "Those trees will lew the house when they're up-grown," i.e., those trees will shelter the house and keep off the wind when they are grown up.
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 92
    LEY lai n. Land untilled. We find this in place-names, as Leysdown in Sheppey. (see also Lay) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 90
    LIB
    vb. To get walnuts of the trees with libbats. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 93
    LIBBAT
    n. A billet of wood; a stick. 1592 - "With that he took a libbat up and beateth out his brains." - Warner. Albion's England. (see also Libbet)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 93
    LIBBET
    n. In the first volume of "Kentish (Wealden) Dialect" (1935), mention is made of Libbet as pertaining to a piece of wood, generally nine to twelve inches long, and mostle used by children to knock down nuts and fruit from trees. (see also Libbat)
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 61
    LIBBET AND DADDY
    n. A childhood game. The 'Daddy' is a spronged stick, forming a three-sided pyramid-like structure. The 'Libbet' is the piece of wood placed under the three-pronged 'Daddy'. It is played (though rarely now) by boys; one throws a 'Libbet' at the 'Daddy' and tries to knock it over, then, should he do so, he and also the other players make a rush to get the 'Libbet' that the 'Daddy' protected. Whoever succeeds in getting the 'Libbet' becomnes the thrower, and so the game continues. The libbet as mentioned in the "Kentish (Wealden) Dialect (1935)" was also used at Kentish Fair coconut shies, in lieu of a ball, some 75 years ago.
    The Dialect of Kent (c1950) Page 61
    LID lid n. A coverlet. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888) Page 93
    LIEF leef adv. Soon; rather; fain; gladly. "I'd as lief come to-morrow." A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888) Page 93
    LIEF-COUP leef-koop n. An auction of household goods, (see also Litcop, Outroope) A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888) Page 93
    LIELOCK
    n. Lilac. - Plumstead, West Kent. L.R.A.G. (see also French May, Laylock) Notes on 'A Dictionary of Kentish Dialect & Provincialisms' (c1977) Page 91
    LIERN
    vb. Learn. Exactly corresponding to Old Frisian. It is probable, from the forms bry-est, dy- epe, etc, that these words were dissyllabic. (see also Lyern)
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 17
    LIESE
    vb. Loose. Exactly corresponding to Old Frisian. Usual Old English forms = Leose (lese). It is probable, from the forms bry-est, dy-epe, etc, that these words were dissyllabic (see also Lyese)
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 17
    LIEVE
    Dear. Exactly corresponding to Old Frisian. It is probable, from the forms bry-est, dy- epe, etc, that these words were dissyllabic (see also Lyeve)
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863)
    LIGHT leit n. (2) The droppings of sheep. (see also Sheep's treddles, Treddles) A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    LIGHT leit n. (1) The whole quantity of eggs the hen lays at one laying. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    LIGHT UPON leit upon vb. To meet; to fall in with any person or thing rather unexpectedly.
    goin' down de roäd." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    LIGHTLY lei-tli adv. Mostly. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    "He lit upon him Page 93
    LIKE leik (2) Adverbial suffix to other words, as pleasant-like, comfortable-like, home-like, etc.
    "It's too clammy-like." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 93
    LIKE leik vb. (1) To be pleased with; suited for; in phrase, to like one's self. "How do you like
    yourself?" i.e., how do you like your present position and its surrounding" ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 93
    LIMB
    n. A young rascal; a naughty child. "I don't known whatever that young limb will be up to next!"
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 60
    LIMB-OF-A-WAY
    adj. A long way; at a good distance. "How far be it to Chart Forstal, sir? Why it be a limb-of- a-way! Quite three or four mile from here, even the shortest way!" (see also Hem-of-a-way)
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 60
    LINCH lin-ch
    n. A little strip of land, to mark the boundary of the fields in open countries, called elsewhere landshire or landsherd, to distinquish a share of land. In Eastry the wooded ridge, which lies over against the church, is called by the name of the Lynch. (see also Lynch)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 93
    LINGER ling-ur vb. To long after a thing. "She lingers after it." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 93
    LINGERING ling-uring adj. Used with reference to a protracted sickness of a consumptive character. "He's in a poor
    lingering way." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    LINGY linj-i adj. Idle and loitering. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    LINK link vb. To entice; beguile; mislead. "They linked him in along with a passel o' good-for-nothin'
    runagates." A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    LIPPEN
    n.pl. Lips. Noun forming plural in 'en'. The Dialect of Kent in the 14th Century. (1863)
    LIRRY lir-r'i n. A blow to the ear. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    LISHY lish-i adj. Flexible; lissome. Spoken of corn, plants and shrubs running up apace, and so growing
    tall and weak. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 94
    LISS
    n. A bridle path or road. A word much in use 50 years ago, particular to Barham and district. "You'll get there qucker if you take the old liss road."
    TheDialectofKent(c1950)
    LISSOM lis-um adj. Pliant; supple. Contracted from lithesome. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    LIST
    adj. The condition of the atmosphere when sounds are heard easily. "Ir's a wonderful list morning."
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    LITCOP lit-kup n. An auction of household goods, (see also Lief-coup, Outroope) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    LITHER lidh-ur adj. Supple; limber; pliant; gentle. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    LIT-IN
    vb. Went in. "They lit-in all unexpected, and all we had in the house was bread and cheese." TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 60
    LIT-OUT
    vb. (1) Went out. This expression is widely used in the USA, especially in the old cow-hand districts, being another instance of Kentish dialect that old pioneers took with them on the covered-wagon trails, and where all along the routes to the Californian seaboard it became one of the most popular expressions of the 'new' language of the later settlers and cowboys. "He lit- out to Denver."
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 60
    LIT-OUT
    vb. (2) Went off. "Butcher Pile lit-out to Ashford early this morning with Muss Maylam's young bulls, an' I doubt ef (if) you'll catch him and his mate up 'fore they gets there."
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 60
    LIVERY livur-i adj. The hops which are at the bottom of the poles, and do not get enough sun to ripen them
    are called white livery hops. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    LOB lob n. To throw underhand. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    LOB-LOW
    vb. (2) To duck down; to lie low. "Look out Bob! Lob-low in this ditch. If the farmer catches us in his meadow now he's laid it in for hay, he won't arf whop us!"
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 62
    LOB-LOW
    vb. (1) To fly low, as rooks do in windy weather; flying just off the ground, or clearing the tops of hedges. "The old rooks aint half a lob-lowing today in this gale!"
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 62
    LODGE loj vb. (2) To lie fast without moving. "That libbat has lodged up there in the gutter, and you
    can't get it down, leastways not without a lather." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 94
    LODGE loj
    n. (1) An outbuilding; a shed, with an implied notion that it is more or less of a temporary character. The particular use to which the lodge is put is often stated, as a cart-lodge, a wagon- lodge. "The daughter of Zion is left as a cottage in a vineyard, as a lodge in a garden of cucumbers." - Isaiah, Ch 1 v 8. "As melancholy as a lodge in a warren." - Much Ado About Nothing, Act 2 Sc 1.
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 94
    LODGED loj-d
    adj. Laid flat; spoken of corn that has been beated down by the wind or rain. "We'll make foul weather with despised tears, Our sighs, and they shall lodge the summer corn." - Richard 2, Act 3 Sc 3. (also Macbeth, 4.1.55)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 95
    LOLLOP
    vb. To lounge about; to lollop about. There was a Wiltshire verb 'to lollop' which is equivalent to 'to lounge'. - Ralph Whitlock 'Wiltshire' p 198.
    Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977) Page 95
    Page 193 of 378
    LOMPEN
    n.pl. Lamps. Noun forming plural in 'en'. TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863)
    LOMPY lomp-i adj. Thick; clumsy; fat. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    LOND
    n. Land. The use of 'o' for 'a'. The Old Frisian, which has been quoted in support of these forms has brond, hond, lond, for brand, hand, and land.
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863)
    LONESOME loan-sum adj. Lonely. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    LONG-DOG
    n. (2) Wealden for any type of dog or hound long in the body; such as dachshunds, whippets, greyhounds and the gipsies' and dealers' mongrel lurcher-dogs.
    TheDialectofKent(c1950)
    LONG-DOG long-dog n. (1) The greyhound. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    'LONG-OF
    abbr. Along of. "Be you a'coming 'long-of us?" TheDialectofKent(c1950)
    LONGTAILS
    n.pl. (2) Pheasants. - J H Bridge. Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977)
    LONGTAILS long-tailz
    n.pl. (1) An old nickname for the natives of Kent. In the library at Dulwich College is a printed broadside entitled "Advice to the Kentish long-tails by the wise men of Gotham, in answer to their late sawcy petition to Parliament." - Fol. 1701.
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 95
    'LONG-WITH
    abbr. Along with. "Be you a-coming 'long-with us." TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 61
    LOOK UPON luok upun vb. To favour; to regard kindly. "He's bin an ole sarvent, and therefore I dessay they look
    upon 'im." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 95
    LOOK'EE
    vb. Look!; Look over there!; Look here! Also "Lookee-here" i.e. "Look you here!" "Look-ee who's coming down the road."
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 62
    LOOKER luok-ur n. (1) One who looks after sheep and cattle grazing in the marshes. His duties with sheep
    are rather different from those of a shepherd in the uplands. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888) Page 95
    LOOKER luok-ur vb. (2) To perform the work of a looker. "John? Oh! he's lookering." A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888) Page 95
    LOOKING-AT luok-ing-at n. In phrase, "It wants no looking-at," i.e., it's plain; clear; self-evident. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888) Page 95
    LOPE-WAY loap-wai n. A private footpath. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888) Page 95
    LORCUS-HEART lau-kus-hart interj. As, "O lorcus heart," which means "O Lord Christ's heart." A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888) Page 90
    LORRY lor-r'i n. Jingling rhyme; spoken by mummers and others. (see also Lerry, Lurry) A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888) Page 95
    Page 195 of 378
    LOSH-HORSE
    n. The third horse of a team. (see also Rod-horse) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    LOST
    vb. Lust. Use of 'o' for 'u'. Old Frisian; onder and op for under and up. TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863)
    LOVE luv; loov
    n. A widow. "John Stoleker's loove." - Burn's History of Parish Registers, p 115. 1492 - "Item rec. of Belser's loue the full of our kene. . . 16s 8d. Item rec. of Sarjanti's loue. . . 13s 5d. Item payde for the buryng of Ellerygge's loue and her monythis mynde. . . 4s" - Churchwardens' Accounts of St Dunstan's, Canterbury. 1505 - "Rec of Chadborny's loove for waste of 2 torchys (at his funeral). . . 8d. Rec. of Chadborny's widow for the bequest of her husband. . . 3s 4d." - Churchwardens' Accounts of St. Andrew's, Canterbury.
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    LOVY
    vb. To love. Anglo-Saxon conjugation. TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863)
    'LOW lou vb. To allow; to suppose, e.g. "I 'low not." for "I allow not." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    'LOW ANCE lou-ans n. An allowance; bread and cheese and ale given to the wagoners when they have brought
    home the load, hence any recompense for little jobs of work. (see also Allowance) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 96
    LOWEY loa-i
    n. The ancient liberty of the family of Clare at Tunbridge, extending three miles from the castle on every side. "The arrangements made by the King for the wardship of Richard of Clare and the custody of the castle appear to have given umbrage to the Archbishop. who (circa, A.D. 1230) made a formal complaint to the King that the Chief Justiciary had, on the death of the late Earl, seized the castle and lowey of Tunbridge, which he claimed as fief of the archbishopric." - Archaeologia Cantiana, 16, p 21
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    LOWS loaz n.pl. The hollows in marsh land where the water stagnates. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    LUBBER HOLE
    n. A place made in a haystack when it is three-parts built, where a man may stand to reach the hay from the men in the wagon, and pitch it up to those on the top of the stack.
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 96
    LUCKING-MILL
    n. A fulling-mill. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 97
    LUG, SIR PETER lug, Sir Peter n. The person that comes last to any meeting is called Sir Peter Lug; lug is probably a
    corruption of lag. (see Peter-Grievious) A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888) Page 97
    LUG-SAND lug'-sand n. The sand where the lugworm is found by fishermen searching for bait. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888) Page 97
    LURRY lur-r'i n. Jingling rhyme; spoken by mummers and others. (see also Lerry, Lorry) A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888) Page 95
    LUSHINGTON
    n. A man fond of drink. "He's a reg'lar lushington, 'most always drunk." A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888) Page 97
    LUSTY lust-i adj. Fat; flourishing; well grown; in good order. "You've growed quite lusty sin' we seed ye
    last." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 97
    LYAF
    n. Leaf. Dissyllabic pronounciation contained in the 'Ayenbite of Inwyt, 1340. 'This practice not only agrees with the present custom of the Frisians, but was, no doubt, that of the Anglo-Saxons.' (see also Leaf, Lyeaf)
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 18
    LYEAF
    n. Leaf. Dissyllabic pronounciation contained in the 'Ayenbite of Inwyt, 1340. 'This practice not only agrees with the present custom of the Frisians, but was, no doubt, that of the Anglo-Saxons.' (see also Leaf, Lyaf)
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 18
    LYEAS
    vb. Lost. Dissyllabic pronounciation contained in the 'Ayenbite of Inwyt, 1340. 'This practice not only agrees with the present custom of the Frisians, but was, no doubt, that of the Anglo-Saxons.' (see also Leas)
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 18
    LYERN
    vb. Learn. Exactly corresponding to Old Frisian. It is probable, from the forms bry-est, dy- epe, etc, that these words were dissyllabic. (see also Liern)
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 17
    LYESE
    vb. Loose. Exactly corresponding to Old Frisian. Usual Old English forms = Leose (lese). It is probable, from the forms bry-est, dy-epe, etc, that these words were dissyllabic. (see also Liese)
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 17
    LYEVE
    Dear. Exactly corresponding to Old Frisian. It is probable, from the forms bry-est, dy- epe, etc, that these words were dissyllabic (see also Lieve)
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 17
    LYNCH lin-ch
    n. A little strip of land, to mark the boundary of the fields in open countries, called elsewhere landshire or landsherd, to distinquish a share of land. In Eastry the wooded ridge, which lies over against the church, is called by the name of the Lynch. (see also Linch)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 93
    LYSTE-WAY list-wai
    n. A green way on the edge of a field. This word occurs in a M.S. dated 1356, which describes the bounds and limits of the parish of Eastry, "And froo the weye foreseyd called wenis, extende the boundes and lymmites of the pishe of Easterye by a wey called lyste towards the easte." - Memorials of Eastry, p 28. (see also Went)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
  • M-N
    M
    MABBLED mab-ld vb. Mixed; confused. "An books and such mabbled up." - Dick and Sal, st 70. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 97
    MAD mad adj. Enraged; furious. "Being exceedingly mad against them, I persecuted them." - Acts, Ch
    26 v 11 ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 97
    MADE-A-FOOLIN'-OF
    vb. To make a fuss of a child or animal. "I don't know what we shall do with ye when your Auntie has gone back. She's proper made-a-foolin'-of ye, since she came over to us on her holidays."
    TheDialectofKent(c1950)
    MAGGOTY mag-uti adj. Whimsical; restless; unreliable. "He's a maggoty kind o' chap, he is." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    Page 64
    Page 97 n. A little frame to stand before the fire to dry small articles. (see also Tamsin)
    MAID maid ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    MAKE EVEN
    vb. (see Even, to make) Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977)
    MAKE OFF
    vb. To make out; to understand.- R Cooke. Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977)
    MAMMICK
    vb. To eat untidily; in a pig-like way. "Drat ye, young Stevie! Doant mammick your food like that. There's more bread and jam on the floor than in your innards!"
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 64
    MAN OF KENT
    phr. A title claimed by the inhabitants of the Weald as their peculiar designation; all others they regard as Kentish men.
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 98
    MANKIE-PEAS
    n.pl The common wood-lice. They are also called peasie-bugs and pea-bugs, as they resemble, when rolled up into a ball, small black pea-like bodies. "Look at they mankie-peas, grandpa! Millions of 'em, in that old log Harry has just broken open!" (see also Cheese-bugs, Monkey-peas, Pea-bugs, Peasie-bugs)
    TheDialectofKent(c1950)
    MANNISH man-ish adj. Like a man; manly. "He's a very mannish little chap." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    MAN-SUCKER man-sukr n. The cuttle-fish - Folkestone. (see also Inkspewer, Squib (2), Tortoise) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    MARCH mar-ch n. Called in East Kent "March many weather." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    MARM maam n. A jelly. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    MARSH maa-sh
    n. In East Kent the Marsh means Romney Marsh, as the Island means the Isle of Thanet in East Kent, or Sheppy in North Kent. Romney Marsh is the fifth quarter of the world which consists of Europe, Asia, Africa, America and Romney Marsh. (see also Mash, Mesh, Mush)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 98
    MARY SPILT THE MILK
    n. Lungwort.- Alice Clarke. 1975. Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977) Page 98
    MARYGOLD mar-r'igold
    n. A lady bird. The first part of the name refers to the Blessed Virgin Mary, and the latter, gold, to the bright orange, or orange-red, colour of the insect. This little insect is highly esteemed in Kent, and is of great service in hop-gardens in eating up the fleas and other insects which attack the hops. (see also Bug (2), Fly-golding, Golding, Lady-bug, Lady Cow, Merrigo)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    MASH mash n. A marsh. (see also Marsh, Mesh, Mush) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    MATCH-A-RUNNING
    n. A game peculiar to Kent, and somewhat resembling prisoner's base. (see also Match- Running , Stroke-bias)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 98
    MATCH-ME-IF-YOU-CAN
    n. The appropriate name of the variegated ribbon-grass of our gardens, anciently called our lady's laces, and subsequently painted laces, ladies' laces, and gardener's garters. Phalaris arundinacea.
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 98
    MATCH-RUNNING
    n. A game peculiar to Kent, and somewhat resembling prisoner's base. (see also Match-a- Running , Stroke-bias)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 98
    MATE mait, mee-ut n. A companion; comrade; fellow-labourer; friend; used especially by husband or wife to
    one another. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    MAUDRING mau-dring vb. Mumbling. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    MAUN maun
    n. A large round, open, deep wicker basket, larger at the top than bottom, with a handle on each side near the top (some have two handles, others of more modern pattern have four); commonly used for carrying chaff, fodder, hops, etc, and for unloading coals. Shakespeare uses the word - "A thousand favours from a maund she drew, Of amber, crystal and of braided jet." - Lover's Complaint, st 6. (see also Maund (1), Moan)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 99
    MAUND maand, maund
    n. (1) A large round, open, deep wicker basket, larger at the top than bottom, with a handle on each side near the top (some have two handles, others of more modern pattern have four); commonly used for carrying chaff, fodder, hops, etc, and for unloading coals. Shakespeare uses the word - "A thousand favours from a maund she drew, Of amber, crystal and of braided jet." - Lover's Complaint, st 6. (see also Maun, Moan)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    MAUND
    n. (2) A hay-cock is called a maund of hay (? a mound of hay) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    MAUNDER mau-nder vb. (1) To scold; murmur; complain. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    MAUNDER mau-nder vb. (2) To walk with unsteady gait; to wander about with no fixed purpose. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 99
    MAW
    vb. Mow. The Northumbrian dialect retained, as it still does, many pure Anglo-Saxon words containing the long sound of 'a', which the Southern dialect changed into 'o'. This word contained in the 'Ayenbite of Inwyt', 1340, resembles the Northumbrian form.
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863)
    MAXHILL
    n. A dungheap. (see also Maxon (1) & (2), Maxul, Misken, Mixon) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    MAXON
    n. (1) A dungheap. (see also Maxhill, Maxon (2), Maxul, Misken, Mixon) A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    MAXON
    n. (2) A dung or manure Maxon is a specially built-up box-like oblong of stable, cow-shed or pig-sty manure: sometime separately, sometimes of all three. Some of these manure-heaps measure many yards in length and width, and sometimes are as much as six feet in height. (see also Maxhill, Maxon (1), Maxul, Misken, Mixen)
    TheDialectofKent(c1950)
    MAXUL maks-l n. A dungheap. (see also Maxhill, Maxon (1) & (2), Misken, Mixon) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    MAY HILL mai hil
    n. Used in the phrase, "I don't think he'll ever get up May hill," i.e., I don't think he will live through the month of May. March, April and May especially, owing to the fluctuations of temperature, are very trying months in East Kent. So, again, the uncertain, trying nature of this month, owing to the cold east or out winds, is further alluded to in the saying - "Ne'er cast a clout Till May is out."
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    MAY-BUG mai-bug n. A cockchafer, otherwise called a July-bug. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    MAYER
    n. Mayor, a civic dignitary. TheDialectofKent(c1950)
    MAY-WEED
    n. Anthemis cotula. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    MAZZARD maz-urd n. Prunus avium. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    MEACH mee-ch vb. To creep about softly. (see also Meecher) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    MEAKERS
    n.pl. Mice; the common house-mice or field mice. "Ye shall soon have to shift that old foggot- stack. Too many o' they meakers be a-nesting in there, and too many of 'em a-finding their way into the cottages as well." (see also Meece, Mickie)
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 65
    MEAL
    n. Ground wheat or any other grain before it is bolted. In bolting, the bran is divided into two qualities, the coarser retains the name of bran, and the finer is called pollard.
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 99
    MEASURE-FOR-A-NEW-J
    vb. To flog; to beat. "Now, you be off, or I'll measure you for a new jacket." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 10
    MEASURING-BUG
    n. The caterpillar. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 10
    MEECE mees n.pl. (1) Mice. "Jus' fancy de meece have terrified my peas." (see also Meakers, Mickie) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 10
    Page 203 of 378
    MEECE
    n.pl. (2) Mice Present dialect form i.e. 1863. Old Kentish 'e' replaces Northern ' i' and Southern 'u'.
    The Dialect of Kent in the 14th Century. (1863)
    MEECHER
    vb. To creep about softly. (see also Meach) A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    MEEN
    vb. To shiver slightly. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    MEENING meen-ing n. An imperfect fit of the ague. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    MEGPY meg-pi n. The common magpie. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    MELK
    n. (2) Milk. Present dialect form i.e. 1863. Old Kentish 'e' Southern 'u'.
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863)
    MELK
    n. (1) Milk.Old Kentish 'e' replaces Northern ' i' and Southern 'u'. TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863)
    MELLE
    Melk (K) = Milk (N) Page 15
    n. Mill. Old Kentish 'e' replaces Northern ' i' and Southern 'u'. Mele (K) = Mill (N) TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 15
    MELT melt n. A measure of two bushels of coals. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 10
    replaces Northern ' i' and Page 16
    MENAGERIE menaaj-uri n. Management; a surprising and clever contrivance. "That is a menagerie!" ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 10
    MEND
    Mind. Old Kentish 'e' replaces Northern ' i' and Southern 'u'. Mend (K) = Mund (S) = Mind (N)
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863)
    MENDMENT
    n. (1) Manure. (see also Amendment) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    MENDMENTS
    n.pl. (2) Manure; the droppings of any bird or animal; animal excretions. TheDialectofKent(c1950)
    MENNYS men-is
    n. A wide tract of ground, partly copse and partly moor; a high common; a waste piece of rising ground. There are many such in East Kent, as Swingfield Minnis, Ewell Minnis, etc. (see also Minnis)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 10
    MENTLE
    n. Mantle Use of 'e' for 'a'. Old Frisian bend=band; stef=staff; sterk=stark; weter= water. The' Ayenbite of Inwyt', 1340, contains this word.
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863) Page 14
    MERCIFUL mer-siful adj. Used as an intensive expletive, much in the same way as "blessed" or "mortal" are used
    elsewhere. "They took every merciful thing they could find." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 10
    MERRIGO mer-r'goa n. A ladybird. (see also Marygold, of which Merrigo is a corruption ) (see also Bug (2),
    Fly-golding, Golding, Lady-bug, Lady Cow, Marygold) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    MERSC
    n. Marsh Use of 'e' for 'a'. Present dialect form i.e. 1863. TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863)
    MERSS
    n. Marsh. Use of 'e' for 'a'. Old Frisian bend=band; stef=staff; sterk=stark; weter= water. The 'Ayenbite of Inwyt', 1340, contains this word.
    TheDialectofKentinthe14thCentury.(1863)
    MESH mesh, maish n. A marsh. (see also Marsh, Mash, Mush) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    MESS-ABOUT
    vb. To waste time. "Don't keep all-on messing-about like that, but come here directly- minute."
    A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    MESSEN
    n.pl. Masses. (Ecclesiastical) Noun forming plural in 'en'. The Dialect of Kent in the 14th Century. (1863)
    MESS-OF-FOOD
    n. A good substantial mess, or basin or platefull of hot food, the quantity and quality of which will fully satisfy even the hungriest of farm-workers.
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 65
    METT met n. A measure containing a bushel. Anglo-Saxon metan, to measure. 1539 - "Paid for a
    mett of salt 11d" - MS Accounts, St John's Hospital, Canterbury. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 10
    MEWSE meuz n. An opening through the bottom of a hedge, forming a run for game. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 10
    MICKIE
    n. The house or field mouse. Mickie has become a generally accepted slang term outside of the Kentish Weald, where it originated, for the common mouse. "Our pantry cupboard is full of little mickies!" "He's as quiet as a mickie." (see also Meakers, Meece)
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 65
    Page 206 of 378
    MICKIE, TO TAKE THE
    phr. To make a fool of a person, in a quiet and often round about way. This universal term "To take the mike (or the mickie) out of me" is really of Weald origin. This came about through the actions of a certain rustic at Pluckley, near Ashford, trying to catch a mouse that had jumped up another farm-hand's sleeve. The helper, who soon has an enthusiastic audience, kept fooling about, not trying to catch the mouse at all, but simply to get it to move from one part of his friend's anatomy to another, until at last the exasperated rustic shouted to his 'helper': "Are you trying to take the mickie out of me?" thereby implying that he did not think his chum was trying to dislodge the mouse, but simply making him look a fool in front of the other farm hands. The farm-hand who coined this phrase was "Plushy" Austin of Honey Farm, Pluckley.
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 66
    MIDDLEBUN mid-lbun n. The leathern thong which connects the hand-staff of a flail with the swingel. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 10
    MIDDLEMAS mid-lmus n. Michaelmas. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 10
    MIDDLING mid-ling
    adj. A word of several shades of meaning, from very much or very good, to very little or very bad. The particular sense in which the word is to be taken for the time is determined by the tone of the speaker's voice alone.
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 10
    MIDDLINGS
    n. An instalment of shoe-money, sometimes given to the pickers in the middle of the hopping time.
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 10
    MILCH-HEARTED milch-haat-id adj. Timid; mild; tender-hearted; nervous. "Jack won't hurt him, he's ever so much too
    milch-hearted." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    MILL mil vb. To melt. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    MILLER'S EYE mil-urz ei
    n. To put the miller's eye out is when a person, in mixing mortar or dough, pours too much water into the hole made to receive it; then they say, "I reckon you've put the miller's eye out now!" - Eastry.
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 10
    MILLER'S THUMB mil-urz-thum n. A fish which is otherwise known as bull-head. Cottus gobio. (see also Corbeau) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 10
    MILLER'S-EYES mil-urz-eiz n.pl. Jelly-fish. - Dover (see also Blue Slutters, Galls, Sea-nettles, Sea Starch, Sluthers,
    Slutters,Stingesr, Water-galls) A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888) Page 10
    MIND meind n. (1) To be a mind to a thing; to intend; purpose; design it. The complete phrase runs
    thus, "I'm a mind to it." A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    MIND meind vb. (2) To remember. "Do you mind what happen'd that time up in Island?" A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    MINE mein n. Any kind of mineral, especially iron-stone. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    MINNIS min-is
    n. A wide tract of ground, partly copse and partly moor; a high common; a waste piece of rising ground. There are many such in East Kent, as Swingfield Minnis, Ewell Minnis, etc. (see also Mennys)
    A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    MINT mint n. The spleen. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    MINTY mint-i adj. Full of mites, used of meal, or cheese. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    MINUTE min-it n. (2) Directly-minute, immediately. (see also Dreckly-minute) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 10
    MINUTE min-it
    n. (1) A Kentish man would say, "a little minute," where another would say, "a minute." So, "a little moment," in Isaiah ch 24, v 20, "Hide thyself as it were for a little moment, until the indignation by overpast."
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    MISCHEEVIOUS
    adj. Mischievous. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    MISERY mis-ur'i n. Acute bodily pain; not sorrow or distress of mind, as commonly. "He's gone in great
    misery for some time." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    MISHEROON
    n. Mushroom. (see also Musheroon, Rooms) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    MISKEN mis-kin n. A dunghill. (see also Maxhill, Maxon (1) & (2), Maxul, Mixon) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    MISS
    n. Abbreviation of mistress. Always used for Mrs., as the title of a married woman. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 10
    MIST mist impers. vb. "It mists," i.e., rains very fine rain. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 10
    MISTUS mis-tus
    n. Mistress; the title of a married woman. "My mistus and me's done very well and comfortable together for 'bove fifty year; not but what we've had a misword otherwhile, for she can be middlin' contrairy when she likes, I can tell ye."
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 10
    MISWORD mis-wurd n. A cross, angry, or abusive word. "He's never given me one misword." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    MITHERWAY
    interj. phr. Come hither away. A call by a wagoner to his horses. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    MITTENS mit-nz n.pl. Large, thick, leathern gloves without separate fingers, used by hedgers to protect their
    hands from thorns. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 10
    MIXON miks-un
    n. A dung-heap; dung-hill. Properly one which is made of earth and dung; or, as in Thanet, of seeweed, lime and dung. Anglo-Saxon, mix, dung; mixen, a dung-hill. (see also Maxhill, Maxon (1) & (2), Maxul in Eastry, Misken)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 10
    MIZMAZE
    n. Confusion; a puzzle. "Time I fell off de stack, soonsever I begun to look about a little, things seemed all of a mizmaze." 1678 - "But how to pleasure such worthy flesh and blood, and not the direct way of nature, is such a mizmaze to manhood." - Howard, Man of Newmarket.
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 10
    MIZZLE
    n. A mist-like rain falling very lightly. "Twouldn't be so bad if it was just a mizzle, but we can't go all that way without our coats now it be mizzling real hard."
    TheDialectofKent(c1950)
    MIZZLING
    vb. A mist-like rain falling heavily. TheDialectofKent(c1950)
    MOAN
    n. A basket, used for carrying chaff or roots for food; and for unloading coals. (see also Maun, Maund)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 10
    MODREN
    n.pl.Mothers. Noun forming plural in 'en'. The Dialect of Kent in the 14th Century. (1863)
    MOKE moak n. A mesh of a net. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    MOLLIE mol-i n. A hedge sparrow; otherwise called Dicky-hedge-poker. A Dictionary of the Kentish Dialect and Provincialisms (1888)
    MONEY mun-i n. The phrase, "good money," means good pay, high wages.
    reckon." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    MONEY-IN-BOTH-POCKE
    "He's getting good money, I Page 10
    n. Lunaria biennis. The plant otherwise known as honesty, or white satin-flower, as it is sometimes called from the silvery lustre of its large circular-shaped saliques, which, when dried, were used to dress up fire-places in summer and decorate the chimney-mantels of cottages and village inns. The curious seed-vessels, which grow in pairs, and are semi- transparent, show the flat disc-shaped seeds like little coins within them, an appearance which no doubt originated the name, Money-in-both-pockets.
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 10
    MONEY-PURSE mun-i-pus n. A purse. "He brought our Jack a leather cap An' Sal a money-puss" - Dick and Sal, st 16. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 10
    MONEY-SPINNER
    n. A small spider supposed to bring good luck. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 10
    MONKEY-PEAS mun-kipees
    n. Wood-louse; also the ligea oceanica, which resembles the wood-louse, and lives in the holes made in the stone by the pholades. (see also Cheese bug, Mankie-peas, Pea-bugs, Peasie-bugs)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 10
    MONT munt n. Month. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 10
    MOOCH
    vb. (2) To slouch; to move about in a lazy, slovenly or flat-footed manner. "There you go again! Mooching along, with your head on the ground. Wearing out they hard-earned boots and likely you'll run yourself into a telegraph-pole or a moty-car!"
    TheDialectofKent(c1950)
    MOOCH mooch vb. (1) Dawdle. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    MOON
    n. 10 bushel basket measures, especially for hops.- East Kent. Nicky Newbury. (see also Half -moon)
    Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977)
    MOOR moor n. Swampy and wet piece of ground. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    MOORNEN moo-rneen n. A moor hen. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    MOOT moo-t n. The root or stump of a tree, which when felled, is divided into three parts; 1st, the moot;
    2nd, the stem; 3rd, the branches. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    MORE moa-r adv. Used of size or dimensions; as "as big more," i.e., as big again. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    MORT mor-t n. Abundance; a large quantity; a multitude. A mort of money, apples, birds, men, etc.
    (see also Mot) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 10
    Page 212 of 378
    MOSES moa-ziz n. A young frog. - East Kent. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 10
    MOSTEST moa-stist adv. Farthest; greatest distance. "The mostest that he's bin from home is 'bout eighteen
    miles." East Kent people seldom travel far from home. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    MOST-TIMES moa-st-teimz adv. Generally; usually. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    MOT mot n. Abundance; a large quantity; a multitude. A mort of money, apples, birds, men, etc.
    (see also Mort) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    MOTHER OF THOUSAND mudh-ur uv thou-zundz n. Linaria cymbularia. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    MOTHERY mudh-ur'i adj. Out of condition; muddy; thick; with a scum or mould on it. "The beer's got pretty
    mothery, seeminly." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    MOVE
    n. An action or plan. "Well, that's a middlin' silly move, let be how 'twill." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    MOWL moul n. Mould. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    MUCH much vb. (1) To fondle; caress; pet. "However did you manage to tame those wild sheep?"
    "Well, I mutched 'em, ye see." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 10
    MUCH much adj. (2) Used with regard to the state of the health. "How are ye to-day?" "Not much, thank
    ye." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    MUCH OF A MUCHNESS
    advl. phrase. Very much alike; as like as two peas. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    MUCH AS EVER much az ev-r adj. Hardly; scarcely; only just; with difficulty. "Shall ye get done (i.e. finish your job) to-
    day?" "Much as ever." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    MUCK muk vb. (1) To dirty; to work over-hard. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    MUCK muk n. (2) A busy person. "De squire was quite head muck over this here Jubilee job." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 10
    MUCK ABOUT muk ubou-t vb. (1) To work hard. "He's most times mucking about somewhere's or another." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 10
    MUCK ABOUT
    vb. (2) To fool about. Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977) Page 10
    MUCK-ABOUT
    vb. (2) To fool about; to fool around. "Go on! muck-about my boy! But if you'r still a- mucking about, times I'm ready to take you out, I'll give 'ee such a bannicking ye'll not know whether you be on yer head or yer heels!" - Ashford and Wealden.
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 66
    MUCKED UP muk-t-up adv. All in confusion and disorder. "I lay you never see such a place as what master's study
    is; 'tis quite entirely mucked-up with books." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page `05
    MUCK-UP
    vb. To lift up. "Hey mister! Gie us a muck-up into the cart with this here bale o' hay, will ye?" - Ashford and District.
    TheDialectofKent(c1950)
    MUDDLE ABOUT mud-l ubou-t vb. To do a little work. "As long as I can just muddle about I don't mind." ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    MULLOCK mul-uk vb. To damp the heat of an oven. A diminutive of Old English mull, which is merely a
    variant of mould. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    MUNTON munt-n n. The mullion of a window. This is nearer to the medieval form munnion. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    MUSH mush n. A marsh. (see also Marsh, Mash, Mesh) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    MUSHEROON mush-iroon n. A mushroom. French, moucheron. (see also Misheroon, Rooms) ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    MUSTER must-r
    n. Mister (Mr.), the title given to an employer, and often contracted into muss. The labourer's title is master, contracted into mass. "Where be you goin'. Mass Tompsett?" "Well, I be goin' 'cross to Muss Chickses."
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    NABBLER nab-lur n. An argumentative, captious person; a gossip; a mischief-maker. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888)
    NACKERS
    n.pl. Testes - Plumstead, West Kent. L.E.A.G. 1920's). Noteson'ADictionaryofKentishDialect&Provincialisms'(c1977)
    NAIL nai-l n. A weight of eight pounds. ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 10
    NAILBOURN nai-lburn, nai-lboarn
    n. An intermittent stream. Harris, in his History of Kent, p 240, writes, "There is a famous eylebourn which rises in this parish (Petham) and sometimes runs but a little way before it falls into the ground;" and again at p 179, Harris writes, "Kilburn saith that AD 1472, here (at Lewisham) newly broke out of the earth a great spring;" by which he probably meant an eylebourn or nailbourn. " Why! the nailbourn's begun to run a' ready." (see also Eylesbourne)
    ADictionaryoftheKentishDialectandProvincialisms(1888) Page 10
    NARL
    n. (2) Nail. "You go ask the shipwright for some four inch narls." "Those narls aint no good for them timbers, try these!" - Medway district.
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page 69
    NARL
    n. (1) A knot of wood. These words - Narl, Narlie and Narlie-wood - are almost extinct. I know of only one old man in the whole of the Medway Towns (Chatham, Rochester, Gillingham and Strood) - at least to my knowledge- who uses the above expressions in regards to wood-knots and knotted timber. - North-East Kent and Medway district.
    TheDialectofKent(c1950) Page